9 December, 2017

"Trade turnover between Ukraine and Lithuania increases by 45% in 2017 - Poroshenko"

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"Norway contributes EUR 950,000 to CoE Action Plan for Ukraine in 2018-2021"

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8 December, 2017

"Polish funds invest EUR 400,000 in Ukrainian fintech-startup"

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"Foreign medicines to be registered in Ukraine under simplified procedure"

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7 December, 2017
AISHA DOWN Editor at The Ukraine Business Journal UGTI on Facebook Ukraine’s IT Industry Could Near $10 Billion by 2025 KYIV -- Ukraine’s dynamic IT outsourcing sector could more than double in the next decade, reaching $8.4 billion in 2025, according to Stanislav Sheliakin, a senior consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, speaking the Ukrainian Software Development Forum. That’s only if the government comes through with vital reforms to protect intellectual property rights and breathe life into outdated labor laws, he added on Friday. Sheliakin’s projection, derived from PwC’s industry studies, suggests a more moderate pace of growth for Ukraine’s IT sector than the past decade, which saw 10-fold industry growth, according to Chirag Rawat, deputy director of Avasant, an international consulting firm. Rawat and Sheliakin were among 50 speakers at the Forum, which brought together hundreds of participants—among them government officials and corporate leaders—to discuss the outlook of Ukraine’s IT. Like Sheliakin, most were optimistic about Ukraine’s potential. Mr. Rawat, who spoke on the global perception of Ukraine as an IT outsourcing destination, cited Ukraine’s talented tech grads as an edge. “Now in Ukraine there are more than 100 research centers of large international companies,” he said, adding that Ukraine had a competitive advantage in niches like blockchain technology and game development. However, the war, perceptions of corruption, and fears about data security still made foreign businesses leery about opening shop here, said Rawat, a native of India. Speaking after the forum, Sheliakin said outdated regulations were a far more significant obstacle than corruption—or even the war.   Independent contractors and IT intellectual property protection “Most Ukrainian IT professionals would like to work as independent contractors,” he said. Independent contractors avoid a mandatory 18 percent payroll tax. Instead, they pay the 5 percent independent contractors’ tax, which is permitted by the government. The problem? While the U.S. and E.U. nations have a body of familiar regulations in place to govern intellectual property rights between independent contractors and their clients, Ukraine’s are far more patchy in the area of transfer of intellectual property rights. “There are a lot of ways for companies to lose money here,” said Mr. Sheliakin. Intellectual property rights are especially important in service industries like IT. Without legislation, an IT contractor could create a spin-off company after closing a deal with a client -- even if they’d been paid to develop an exclusive product. At present, said Sheliakin, some companies, like Ciklum, find ways—usually after extensive consultation—to frame contracts and navigate Ukraine’s legislation. For now, Ciklum’s might be the best approach, he said—besides moving company headquarters abroad. “I don’t see [this legislation] as being ready in a year or two,” Sheliakin said.     Sourse: http://www.theubj.com/news/view/ukraines-it-industry-could-near-10-billion-by-2025

"Finnish NEFCO company to develop green projects in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine boosts sugar exports by almost 60%"

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6 December, 2017

"United States helps Ukraine discover more than $3 bln stolen public funds"

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"Ukraine, China sign program of investment cooperation in agricultural sector"

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5 December, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook A Ukrainian House in New York's East Village I met last week in NYC with my friends and colleagues Mariya Soroka, Ivan Chaika and Alex Gorbachov to discuss a “Ukrainian House” community / co-working space concept for New York’s East Village. The East Village – where I was born and raised - has since the 19 Century been a neighborhood of immigrants (German, Jewish, Polish and Ukrainian). For a fascinating history of the neighborhood and a neighborhood Landmark I encourage you to read an article in 6sqft is published by CityRealty titled “Jewish gangsters, jazz legends, and Joy Division: The evolution of the Ukrainian National Home.” https://www.6sqft.com/jewish-gangsters-jazz-legends-and-joy-division-the-evolution-of-the-ukrainian-national-home/ Another recent article in the New York Times titled “With Closing of East Village Shop, Little Ukraine Grows Smaller” tells an important story about the history of the neighborhood as well as its character today. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/06/nyregion/with-closing-of-east-village-shop-little-ukraine-grows-smaller.html As the title suggests, the East Village is looking less and less like “Little Ukraine” with each passing year. That said, a new generation of young Ukrainian-Americans and Ukrainian-American organizations like Razom for Ukraine and stepping into the neighborhood and revitalizing the community and building on the legacy that my mother, grandparents and their respective generations built on New York’s East side. “Ukrainian House” (a working name) is envisioned as both an institution firmly rooted in New York but also as a bridge to contemporary Ukraine and Ukrainians, in particular to the thriving civic and startup communities bubbling with activity in Ukraine among Ukrainians that are – for the most part - under 40. Although “Ukrainian House” is not formally a UGTI project, as a native son of the East Village and Ukrainian-American committed to building a better future for Ukraine and Ukrainians I will lend my time and energy to helping ensure that this project becomes both a reality and a success. Stay tuned for updates!

"Ukraine, China implementing some joint projects for $7 bln"

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"Parliament ratifies investment agreement between Ukraine and OPEC Fund"

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4 December, 2017

"Ukraine intends to extend govt securities, raise domestic borrowings"

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"The Ukrainian Central Bank Is Expanding Its Blockchain Team"

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2 December, 2017

"Ukraine harmonizing legal framework in export control with EU norms"

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"It’s quite possible to achieve 5% GDP growth next year - PM Groysman"

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1 December, 2017

"China can invest $8-12 bln in Ukraine within five years - MP"

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"Renewable energy generation capacity of 300 MW to be installed in 2017"

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30 November, 2017
BORYS HUMENIUK Ambassador of Ukraine to the Republic of Cyprus UGTI on Facebook Priorities for Ukraine: European Union integration IN 2017, Ukraine has continued to implement structural reforms, generating positive trends in the economic and social sphere despite internal and external challenges. The illegal annexation of Crimea and Sevastopol by the Russian Federation and the conflict in the east of the country provoked by Russia’s destabilising actions have continued to pose significant challenges to Ukraine’s reform process from a political and economic perspective, in addition to causing significant human suffering. Ukraine has continued actively to seek peaceful legal and political solutions in this area. Considerable legislative reforms have taken place in the fight against corruption and new specialised anti-corruption institutions have been set up in Ukraine. Work on implementation of anti-corruption efforts continued over the past year, while further substantial work is still outstanding. Some of the new Ukrainian agencies already participate actively in the fight against corruption, while others remain to be fully operationalised. Ensuring sustainable and tangible changes in the governance system to eliminate corruption opportunities and ensure proper prosecution and punishment for corruption-related crimes remains one of the key challenges Ukraine faces in its reform process hindering the improvement of the business and investment climate. With full entry into force of the Association Agreement and introduction of visa-free travel, Ukraine and the European Union had reached qualitatively new ambitious level. A new political and contractual reality establishes proper conditions for elaboration of a new forward-looking strategic agenda, which will foster further transformations in Ukraine towards the best European standards and practices. The President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko put forward five new strategic long-term goals on the road of Ukraine’s European integration: association of Ukraine with the Schengen Area; integration into EU Customs Union; integration into EU Energy Union; integration into EU Single Digital Market; and entry into EU Common Aviation Area. Implementation of these initiatives is in the interest of both Ukraine and the European Union. The Bulgarian presidency of the EU Council as an EU Member State from the Central-Eastern Europe and the Black Sea region has a unique opportunity and advantage to bring new impetus to the developments in the region. With a view towards the Bulgarian presidency being a success story, Ukraine has elaborated short-term priorities of its relations with the EU. We rely on Bulgarian leadership in the EU Council and EU member-states, including the Republic of Cyprus, to facilitate their effective implementation. Particularly, we urgently need further international support for Ukraine in the context of ongoing Russian aggression. This kind of support could be provided by upholding EU’s personal and economic sanctions against Russia until full restoration of sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine, regularly updating the sanctions list of persons and entities responsible for the violation of territorial integrity and sovereignty of Ukraine over Crimea, preventing bypassing of the restrictive measures by the EU economic operators, as well as illegal visits to the occupied territories of Crimea and Sevastopol by EU citizens, organisations and companies, blocking any attempts of Russia to legitimize the occupation of Crimea and city of Sevastopol in the framework of international agreements and launching the UN peacekeeping operation in the occupied territories in the Donbas in accordance with the UN peacekeeping principles in coordination and by agreement with Ukraine, and pressing Russia to release immediately Ukrainian political prisoners and hostages while establishing an international Group of Friends of Ukraine for de-occupation of Crimea and at the same time intensifying efforts to counter Russian propaganda. In the field of trade and economy Ukraine needs much support in implementation of DCFTA commitments between Ukraine and the EU, establishment of new financial instruments to enhance AA/DCFTA implementation and to boost domestic and foreign investments to Ukraine, continuation of EU-Ukraine High Level Industrial Dialogue in order to accelerate approximation of EU rules for industrial technical regulations and standards, with the view to forge closer links between European and Ukrainian industrial sectors, promoting Ukraine’s participation in the EU Digital Single Market, establishment of export promotion agency, Support Ukraine-EU dialogue on accelerated liberalisation of trade in services in the DCFTA framework, focusing on a several priority sectors. We need further financial assistance as well, particularly by ensuring due level of Ukraine’s participation in the EU’s initiative on the External Investment Plan aimed at providing assistance to the EU Neighbourhood, revising the EIB External Lending Mandate for Ukraine including for rehabilitation of Donbas and with regard to lending to sub-sovereign borrowers, ensuring EU’s financial and humanitarian assistance to the population in the Donbas, and supporting establishment of a European Investment Plan for Ukraine based on the best practices of multi-donor instruments. The investors/donors’ international conference for Ukraine in Brussels in 2018 will be a great support to this end. Despite the continuing conflict in its East, Ukraine has demonstrated unprecedented levels of resilience and persistence in achieving societal change, asserting its European orientation. Expectations regarding the EU remain high. Civil society continues to play a pivotal role in the country’s reform progress, counterbalancing strong vested interests still represented in parliament and among institutions and authorities. With the entry into force of the AA/DCFTA and visa liberalisation, EU-Ukraine relations have never been so intense. In order to attract the investment necessary for sustainable economic development and for an improvement in standards of living across the country, including for the most vulnerable segments of the population, the authorities are being urged by civil society and international partners to redouble their efforts in the pursuit of meaningful reform, intensifying in particular the fight against corruption at all levels. The EU is consolidating its political, technical and financial support, with clear conditionality. In 2018, Ukraine will continue to undertake political and economic reforms in numerous key sectors, in the context of its political association and economic integration with the EU. It will also continue to address significant macroeconomic imbalances. Through policy dialogue and financial assistance the EU, during the Bulgarian presidency of the EU Council, in collaboration with international partners, has to proceed with supporting measures aiming at improved governance, the fight against corruption, judiciary reform, public administration reform and decentralisation. And without any doubt, continuous emphasis has to be placed on support for the implementation of the Association Agreement.     Sourse: http://cyprus-mail.com/2017/11/25/priorities-ukraine-european-union-integration/

"Finland’s foreign ministry, NEFCO setting up fund for financing renewable energy in Ukraine by EUR 6 mln"

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"British parliamentarians start visit to Ukraine"

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29 November, 2017

"Electric car sales in Ukraine increase 3.2-fold in Jan-Oct"

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"II Ukrainian Renewable Energy Forum to kick off in Kyiv tomorrow"

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28 November, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine & the world needs blockchain technology I am sure by now everyone heard all the hype about Bitcoin. Yesterday it reached $10,000. But not everyone aware the Bitcoin is based on the blockchain technology. It is my view, as important as crypto currencies might become, the long term play is an opportunity blockchain technology provides. For countries like Ukraine and many other developing economies, if operations of the government and business is conducted on blockchain it creates transparency and drastically reduces corruption at all levels. It improves investor’s trust and confidence to put their hard earned money to work. Further, properly structured, SMART tokens give inventors and business owners an opportunity to reduce risks, reduce operating expenses and at the same time provide liquidity for both. The future of the earth, civilization and all its assets belong to an individual human. The humanity was given a key in the form of Blockchain technology to change the way we live today and to harmonize human relationships around the world. We believe Suntri ( full disclosure: I recently become CEO of the United States based company) is a solution and the way to create decentralized globalization platform with decision power at individual level anywhere in the world. Blockchain will give power back to an individual in a truly democratized way to empower an individual. It is a new global operating system based on principals of decentralized operations at all levels of governance and management. The new global democracy will be based on collective decisions of parties interested in a subject. Suntri is created to facilitate the transformation process. • Blockchain technology will transform all sectors of the global economy; • Blockchain technology will move governments and corporations from the centralized system to the decentralized system of governance; • Blockchain technology will make corruption a thing of the past; • Blockchain technology will eliminate need of a “middle man” in most industries reducing the cost of all operations; • Blockchain technology will give an access of low cost capital to every corner of the world and to any individual; • Blockchain technology will allow freedom to invest Ukraine is already one of the global leaders in blockchain. It can give country an opportunity to export it’s know how and solutions, but it also will facilitate in attracting Foreign Direct Investment in the country. Our team is working on several very exciting projects for Ukraine in this space. Stay tuned.

"Japan simplifies visa regime for Ukrainians from 2018 – pm Abe"

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"Ukraine, China approve updated bilateral program of space cooperation until 2020"

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27 November, 2017

"Capital investments in Ukraine grew 20.7% in January-September 2017"

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"Australian Ukrainians welcome Australia’s foreign policy White Paper"

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25 November, 2017

"Cyber attacks, hybrid war biggest threats for EaP countries"

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"About EUR 750 mln invested in development of renewable energy sources in Ukraine over past three years"

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24 November, 2017

"Ukrainian IT company among 500 world's largest software manufacturers"

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"Ukraine’s National Police, Microsoft sign cybersecurity agreement"

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23 November, 2017
DONALD N. JENSEN Senior Adjunct Fellow at the Center for European Policy Analysis UGTI on Facebook ARE UKRAINE’S REFORMS REVERSIBLE? Many people — especially in Russia — have long accepted a narrative about Ukrainian history and society that is largely false, distorted or simplified: that Ukraine was merely an offshoot of Russia, that Russia is the principal successor of the great East Slavic state of medieval Kyivan Rus, and that Ukraine was a backward, unsophisticated province of the great Russian (and Soviet) empires without a true language or culture of its own. Indeed, Russian President Vladimir Putin has stated several times that he believed Ukraine was not even a real country. Since the 2014 Maidan Revolution, moreover, the Kremlin has concocted a propaganda mishmash to rationalize its shock that Ukraine — though closely related to Russia in some ways — is a state that wants to shape its own future independent of Moscow. Russian officials and the Kremlin propaganda machine thus have claimed that the Kyiv government is dominated by fascists, that anti-Semitism is rampant, and that ethnic Russians in eastern Ukraine are victims of discrimination. Little of this is true. In fact, Moscow’s efforts — especially its bloody military invasion — to hold Ukraine close against its will have backfired and driven Ukraine more quickly toward the West. “The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people,” John Adams wrote to a friend in 1818 of the American war for independence. The United States and Ukraine are vastly different, but a comparable transformation of popular attitudes appears to have taken place among Ukrainians since the Maidan. More than 90 percent of Ukraine’s inhabitants now consider themselves ethnic Ukrainians, and only 5.5 percent Russians, found a recent poll conducted by the Gorshenin Institute. In addition, 84.6 percent of those living in eastern Ukraine consider themselves Ukrainian. Since the Maidan, Ukraine’s national identity has come to include a strong anti-Russian animus. In an April 2017 public opinion survey by Rating Group Ukraine, 57 percent of Ukrainians expressed a very cold or cold attitude toward Russia, while only 17 percent expressed a very warm or warm attitude. As anti-Russian sentiment has grown, so has the West’s appeal. The European Union, with its allure of economic prosperity and functioning democracy, has long attracted the interest of a sizeable portion of the Ukrainian population. The last three years have also witnessed growing Ukrainian public support for joining NATO. While the EU offers proximity, the Ukrainian government and many Ukrainians see the United States as Kyiv’s primary security partner. What do these changes in attitude mean for Ukrainian reform? An outstanding report by the distinguished Chatham House think tank takes note of Ukraine’s fight for survival as an independent and viable state. It finds that much of what Ukraine has achieved is susceptible to reversal, and that underlying political conditions are “far from healthy.” Ukraine’s “core security objectives,” the report argues, depend on national cohesion, wise allocation of resources, and a long-term commitment by state and society alike. The more pluralistic, Western-oriented values of much of society — but by no means all of it — will likely ensure that there will be no literal reversion to the past. Ukraine is unlikely to move back into Moscow’s orbit. But the problems outlined by the Chatham House report remain, and mean the struggle for reform will probably take new forms — in increased tensions between an active civil society and often corrupt political and economic elites, and in the fight against corruption. Rather than increase its military involvement in the Donbas, Moscow is likely to try to exploit strains in Ukrainian society by stepping up its meddling in Ukrainian politics. In recent months, Ukraine’s intelligence service has identified a center in Kharkiv — an internet storefront — that plans and finances Russian activities. Russian-sponsored gangs vandalize Polish or Hungarian monuments so that Ukrainians are blamed or they, alternatively, vandalize Ukrainian monuments so that Poles are blamed. They also damage synagogues and pit groups against one another. They recently defaced a poster of Pope John Paul II with “anti-Polish slogans.” Vandals who are arrested have often been directly linked to parties or companies still controlled by Ukraine’s deposed dictator, Viktor Yanukovych. Such methods are less brutal than large-scale military intervention, but reflect no less accurately the Kremlin’s continued commitment to denying Ukraine the future favored by most of its citizens.     Sourse: http://infowar.cepa.org/EN/Are-Ukraines-reforms-reversible

"President of Ukraine signs judicial reform"

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"Ukraine agrees with UAE on joint aircraft production"

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22 November, 2017

"Projected growth of production in Aerospace industry in Ukraine estimated at 30% in 2017 – SSAU"

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"Ukraine saves over 7 bln cu m of gas thanks to alternative sources"

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21 November, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Co-founder Update UGTI has developed a clear opportunity pipeline and is focused on closing a number of strategically critical projects during the first half of 2018. During the holiday lull, my personal focus will be on raising awareness in the United States of the critical importance to Ukraine and to the national strategic interests of the United States of the proper implementation of an independent anti-corruption court in Ukraine. Together with colleagues in New York and Ukraine we made interesting progress on this front today and look forward to providing a substantive update on this effort soon. Слава Україні!

"Ukraine raises export of electricity by almost 1.4 times in ten months"

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"Ukraine up from 84th to 43rd position in Taxation rating over year "

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20 November, 2017

"Space industries of Ukraine and Canada have potential for cooperation"

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"U.S. National Security Council approves $47 mln grant on weapons for Ukraine - ABC"

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18 November, 2017

"Stoltenberg: NATO doors opened for Ukraine"

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"Cybersecurity: Barely perceptible threat has potential to derail Canada's economy"

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17 November, 2017

"U.S. Senate approves defense budget with lethal weapons for Ukraine"

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"Ambassador Du Wei: Silk Road to strengthen Ukraine-China relations"

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16 November, 2017
BERMET TALANT Journalist at the Kyiv Post UGTI on Facebook Ukraine loses wealth as rich, powerful set up offshore schemes The world’s rich and powerful people continue to surprise the rest of the world with how secretly and unfairly their wealth is being secured. The Paradise Papers, a leak of 13.4 million offshore documents published on Nov. 5 mostly came from two offshore services firms, Bermuda-based Appleby and Singapore-based Asiaciti Trust, as well as from 19 corporate registries maintained by governments in secret offshore jurisdictions. Among those exposed were U. S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, pop star Madonna, tech giant Apple, Queen Elizabeth and at least 11 Ukrainian business and political heavyweights, including President Petro Poroshenko. Weeks before the Paradise Papers became public on Nov. 5, Appleby announced that it had been hacked and that their documents were leaked to journalists of Suddeutsche Zeitung and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.   Billions gone It’s hard to say how much developing countries like Ukraine are losing due to offshores. But the figure is in the billions. Kostiantyn Likarchuk, senior partner at Kinstellar, says that Ukraine’s state budget is deprived of at least tens of billions of dollars due to offshore tax evasion. The Economist suggests a similar number, estimating roughly 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product, standing at $93 billion in 2016, has been lost this way during the 1990s and 2000s. The Tax Justice Network, a non-profit advocacy group, suggests that globally, annual tax losses are at $500 billion or more. This represents over 20 percent of corporate tax revenues which have not been paid. Global estimates of wealth hidden by individuals via offshores are astounding, ranging anywhere between 7.6 trillion to $32 trillion.   Why offshore? Offshores can be used for various purposes such as securing patents and intellectual property, but for many the principal attraction of these tax havens is secrecy and the low-tax or no-tax business environment. Although setting up an offshore company isn’t necessarily unlawful, it is considered unethical by many. “No one would go to the trouble of setting up an offshore company if they could do this at home or onshore,” George Turner, a researcher at Tax Justice Network, told the Kyiv Post. “In this way, offshores allow them to do things they can’t do otherwise.” Offshore companies, often dummies, are used not only to avoid paying taxes but also hide cash flow and ill-gotten property. Moving activities offshore isn’t cheap. One of the firms operating in Bermuda, Healy Consultants Group PLC, advertises some of its services online for $16,980. This would include offering registration of an exempt company that would not have to pay taxes or act according to the usual regulations of its home country. One can register their offshore in three weeks with a minimum capital deposit of $1. No physical office is required and no corporation tax is applied. Bermuda is a famous tax haven, but some European countries also offer tax relief and little regulation. Transparency International found 766 companies registered in the United Kingdom that had been directly involved in laundering over $100 billion out of at least 13 countries, including Ukraine. This widespread use of offshore jurisdictions also distorts the statistics of foreign investment flow. Ukraine’s top foreign direct investors come from Cyprus, British Virgin Islands, Netherlands as well as Belize, Panama, Seychelles, Luxembourg, and Switzerland, according to the State Statistics Service.   Non-tax reasons Kinstellar’s Likarchuk says that there are many purposes of an offshore. One reason is to secure a business under British law since it is more “convenient and flexible” when resolving a dispute.   “Most people, even very powerful and influential want to bring their disputes out of Ukraine and have them resolved somewhere abroad in London, Stockholm or elsewhere,” Likarchuk said. This assures a higher level of security and stability as well as provides companies with more access to foreign banks that often will not accept Ukrainian law-governed documents. Another reason would be to secure business operational activity such as protecting patents and intellectual property. “From an operational perspective, you would establish structures outside of Ukraine,” Likarchuk said. “It’s quite normal.” It becomes more controversial when one structures a mergers and acquisitions transaction. “That’s when people try to avoid taxes,” Likarchuk said. This way one can transfer large amounts of money immediately avoiding the need to pay taxes. “That’s when these kind of British Virgin Islands and Cyprus holdings kick in.” Another aspect is confidentiality and the option to hide behind trust declarations such as if an owner of an expensive yacht or car would want to avoid declaring the expensive asset.   Avoidance vs evasion The distinction between tax avoidance and tax evasion is clear. Tax avoidance means taking advantage of loopholes in legislation, while tax evasion is an absolutely illegal action where an entity does not declare income, property, or commits fraud in order not to pay taxes. But both are the same in a sense that someone deliberately sets out to not pay taxes. “It is important to remember that both start with the same intention and in the end have the same result — societies lose money. Both practices are abusive and governments need to challenge them,” Turner said.   Fighting the system The Tax Justice Network suggests several ways to combat tax dodging via offshore jurisdictions. One way is to set up an automatic exchange of banking information. If a Ukrainian citizen sets a bank account on the British Virgin Islands, the offshore bank would have to pass on the information to the Ukrainian authorities. Full disclosure of beneficiaries is another step. Today, most company registries list owners and directors, who may not be the ultimate beneficiaries of the company. In 2017, Ukraine integrated its national registry of beneficiary ownership to integrate with the global Open Ownership Register. The website combines data from company registers around the world where anyone can search for information on specific companies. Finally, multinational corporations must publish financial reports on revenues, sales, staff, taxes paid, losses based on every country. This way, it will be easy to see the discrepancy between operations and profits of a company in the particular country in which it operates.   Sourse: https://www.kyivpost.com/ukraine-politics/ukraine-loses-wealth-rich-powerful-set-offshore-schemes.html

"Hahn says EU ready to continue helping Ukraine implement reforms"

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"Ukraine, China may cooperate in production of electric vehicles"

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15 November, 2017

"World Bank impressed with reform process in Ukraine"

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"HarvEast seeks to double investment in 2018"

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14 November, 2017
DAR'YA ANASTASʹYEVA Chief Editor at AgroReview UGTI on Facebook Blockchain - Chinese wall of information security Within the framework of the 2nd Annual AgroIT Conference, we had a conversation with SuntriBlockChain Operation System’s founders, Henry Shterenberg and Roman Nazarov, then we tried to figure out how much Ukraine is willing to change its approach to information policy and why farmers need blockchain. Blockchain is a distributed database. Any technology has a server, and if there is one server, even with a few keys, the access is available to several people. They can change the data if they want to, or if they aree forced to. Also, there are hacking attacks directed straight to the server, causing damage to companies. Blockchain, which brings together a huge number of servers, displays the changes made on all servers at once, while changing any number or letter in one of the databases. Consequently, it is impossible to spoil the data or enter them incorrectly unnoticed. Blockchain eliminates corruption at all levels. Hacker attacks are played on a specific server, there are hundreds of them in blockchain, so the data that it contains are saved. Cybersecurity is one of the most important tasks facing the whole world and Ukraine in particular. Today our country, considering the war with Russia, is becoming one of the main players in the field of cybersecurity, but unfortunately, work in this area is not serious enough. Our company is actively working in this direction; we are in the process of creating "Ukrainian Dream" Cybersecurity Center for Ukraine in the Silicon Valley. The main project, which is currently being developed by SuntriBlockChain Operation System is the land platform. There is a lot of hype around Blockchain technology because of Cryptocurrencies (most of which, by the way, will soon cease to exist at all, and the rest will be used completely differently). The most important progress of the economy and business in the global context will be the monetization of land without its sale. Investors from all over the world will be able to enter our cooperative model and buy land. Due to to the creation of a corporate model today, the cost per hectare of land has decreased. Blockchain enables each farmer (no matter, he has 10,000 or 2 hectares) to monetize what he has. Investors are buying tokens in a cooperative for every hectare of land without buying land physically. Thus, as a result, they increase the price of a token by raising the value of land and dividends from the products that the land provides. What a farmer receives in this case are: less amount of expenses, better technology, regardless of the culture of cultivation and as a result - increased productivity. And when the productivity increases - the price of land increases. The cooperative attracts the best technologies - from organic fertilizers that clean the earth, to the satellite images that allow to keep track of the land and harvest from above and see the entire picture. Ukraine is one of the leaders in blockchain technologies. Our project "Ukrainian Dream" has united in cooperation the Academy of Sciences, state and business of Ukraine for the first time during the years of independence. In addition, the Prime Minister Mr.Groysman announced the transition of the State Land Cadastre to the blockchain technology. According to Henry Shterenberg, this technology is capable of changing the world, as it will eliminate the existence of a credit system, banks, notarial services, etc. The main difficulties encountered by the blockchain lobbyists are the lack of specialists and the unwillingness of businesses to actively adopt and implement something new.     Sourse: https://agroreview.com/news/blokchejn---kytajska-stina-informacijnoyi-bezpeky

"Disinformation in social networks influenced elections in 18 countries - Freedom House"

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"Kuwait interested in AN-178 aircraft - National Security and Defense Council"

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13 November, 2017

"U.S. successfully launches Antares rocket designed by Ukraine"

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"World Bank Group President starts visit to Ukraine"

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11 November, 2017

"Ukrainian-made An-132D transport aircraft showcased at Dubai Air Show "

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"S&P affirms 'B-/B' ratings on Ukraine with stable outlook"

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10 November, 2017

"World Bank Group President to visit Ukraine"

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"Ukraine, Japan have good prospects for developing relations - Poroshenko"

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9 November, 2017

"U.S. Congress approves defense budget of $350 mln for Ukraine"

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"Canada eases visa requirements for Ukrainians"

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8 November, 2017

"EBRD confirms stable growth of Ukraine's GDP"

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"IMF expert group to visit Kyiv for technical discussion of draft budget 2018"

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7 November, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Anti-corruption Court As a Ukrainian-American committed to help build a better future for Ukraine and Ukrainians and working to promote investment in and trade with Ukraine, I believe without reservation that the struggle against corruption and the entrenched status quo struggle presents no less formidable an obstacle to delivering on the promise of Maidan than Ukraine's war with Russia. Countries Ukraine might emulate to guide reforms are anchored by a common understanding of social and business norms enforced by the rule of law. Equally significant, multinational Western corporations and investment houses dominate the internal economy of each Western “first world” country and control the largest proportion of trade among them. Ukraine cannot join the West as an exception to this rule, because the desired outcome necessarily springs from a sharing in Western norms and the legal framework for enforcing them. With the patience of its citizens running thin and with Western resolve less steadfast than the Kremlin’s, a necessary condition for current leadership in Ukraine to deliver on the demands of Maidan, deter Russia, and protect Ukraine against future aggression is for Western and Ukrainian governments (and business interests) to work in a concerted, coordinated manner to drastically and expediently increase the presence of Western multinationals and investment houses in Ukraine to break its dependence on local oligarchs and thereby speed the “Westernization” of its economy. In this context, implementing a transparent and independent anti-corruption court is the most important issue in Ukraine today. Ukrainians, both at home and abroad, as well as western partners of Ukraine must campaign against endemic corruption and other lingering hallmarks of the economic and political status quo in Ukraine in the same breath and with equal vigor as their armed forces fight in the Donbas.

"US Assistant Secretary of State to visit Kyiv in a week"

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"Turkey interested in development of alternative energy in Ukraine"

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6 November, 2017

"Ukraine delegates meet with South Korea official to discuss IT, telecoms"

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"Marshall Plan for Ukraine to be presented in Vilnius"

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4 November, 2017

"Ukroboronprom soon to announce tender to attract strategic consultant for financial audit"

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"Foreign investors are more interested in assets in Ukraine - Deloitte Ukraine partner"

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3 November, 2017

"Ukraine shows new transport An-178 in Kuwait - media"

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"IMF estimates Ukraine's corruption-related losses"

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2 November, 2017
ROSTYSLAV AVERCHUK Guest editor VoxUkraine UGTI on Facebook Ukraine: Reforming a Country in War is Difficult, but There Is No Other Way The recent opinion article on EUobserver, “West Needs to Get Real on Ukraine”, calls upon the West and supporters of reforms in Ukraine to realize how difficult it is to implement changes while fighting off Russia’s aggression and suggests that they should decrease the pressure on the Ukrainian government. The authors argue that it is necessary to put off major reforms because they divert valuable resources, generate instability and undermine national unity. At first glance, some of the arguments may seem to be convincing. Yet the reasoning behind the key arguments is not persuasive. The article “West needs to get real on Ukraine” by Roman Sohn and Ariana Gic considers the expectations about reforms in Ukraine in the context of Russia’s aggression. The authors rightly note that the demand that Ukraine carries out reforms does not free the West from the necessity to resolutely oppose Russia. They are also right to argue that the Government bears the full burden of political responsibility; hence one should recognize its achievements and be objective when criticizing it. Other points, however, are much more controversial. The authors argue that Ukraine needs to mobilize all of its resources to win the war and should thus put resource-intensive and destabilizing reforms on hold. The article calls upon the West to abandon unrealistic expectations about the progress of reforms in Ukraine, recognize the priority of its right to defend itself, and let Ukrainian society determine the balance and pace of the reforms. The lobbyists of reforms should focus on promoting the demand for change among the population.   Mobilise all resources to win the war before turning attention to reforms?   As the authors write, Ukraine confronts a much stronger opponent. Russia has an interest and ability to wage a hybrid war for quite some time. Even if Ukraine does mobilize all of its resources, will it be able to end this conflict – and if so, when and at what cost will this happen? Ukraine lacks the resources to win a decisive victory whereas a gradual build-up of armaments at the country’s own expense will not be enough to stop the simmering conflict. One should thus not expect the conflict to end soon. Therefore, all the ways to enhance the country’s ability to withstand Russia’s pressure over a long period constitute an effective use of resources. It is right though that a balance must be found between maintaining defence capabilities in the short run and the accumulation of resources in the medium run. Besides, putting the economy on a war footing would provoke a socio-economic instability at least equal to one that, the authors fear, is created by reforms. The authors also emphasize that significant changes should be clearly validated by the people. Yet to what extent is the society willing to support the full mobilization of resources for military purposes? Recent reports about the embezzlement by high-ranking officials at the Defense Ministry do not help here. As long as the level of perception of corruption remains high, doubts as to the real use of funds will linger. Apart from corruption, the weakness of the Ukrainian state, and hence of the army, arguably results from the low efficiency of the use of available resources. Reforms, which are long overdue, could improve the situation. The authors believe that liberal Western institutions are equally unable to fend off Russia’s attacks. In their opinion, this shows that pro-Western reforms will not enhance Ukraine’s ability to resist Russia’s aggression. However, this comparison is hardly convincing. Western institutions were not created to withstand Russia, yet there is no doubt that they can be more effective than their unreformed analogues. Moreover, it remains unclear what the actual impact of Russia’s interference in the internal affairs of Western countries is, especially compared with its interference in Ukraine.   Reforms scatter the country’s resources?   Reforms do not necessarily consume valuable internal resources. Some reforms are already being financed by the West. For example, the EU is committed to providing €100 mln to fund the public administration reform. Other reforms, such as the reform of inefficient state enterprises, are not prohibitively expensive yet can play a crucial role in balancing public finances, reducing corruption risks, attracting foreign investment etc. Any difficulties here are mostly of political nature. Moreover, the state has also been carrying out a number of reforms without any pressure from the West, even though they require considerable expenses, e.g. the education reform. Therefore, if reforms are high on the priority list, resources can be found.   The expectations of the West are utopian and its pressure excessive?   Western governments and organizations provide a balanced assessment of the progress of reforms in Ukraine. Francis Malige, EBRD’s Managing Director, says that Ukraine’s reform successes have exceeded his expectations. David Lipton, First Deputy Managing Director of the IMF, also emphasizes Ukraine’s achievements in macroeconomic stabilization, banking sector reform, innovative decisions in public procurement, etc. One can thus hardly say that the West has utopian expectations or that it underestimates Ukraine’s achievements. It may be rather tempting instead to accuse Ukraine’s government of encouraging utopian expectations. For instance, a number of extremely optimistic goals in President Poroshenko’s Strategy 2020 were not imposed by any Western government, international organization, or Ukrainian NGO. On the other hand, it reflects the aspiration of the Ukrainian people for change. The West does exert pressure on Ukraine’s government. Still, according to the publicly available information, the interaction between Ukraine and e.g., the IMF, hardly resembles blackmail. The negotiations are ongoing and the IMF is well aware of the difficulties and political nuances that major reforms entail. Deadlines are often postponed. For example, the IMF understands that the opposition to lifting the ban on land sales in Ukraine is currently too strong. In the words of David Lipton, “What was agreed is that more time is needed to get the right decision on this important topic.” The authors rightly point out that the West needs to deal more resolutely with Russia’s aggression. They are not alone in thinking so. Chatham House’s experts argue that the West can and should do more to dissuade Russia from continuing its hostilities against Ukraine. However, they also believe that one of the ways to do this is to ensure the continuity and depth of reforms in Ukraine: to that end, it is necessary both to give more support to Ukraine and to make sure that it undertakes real, not cosmetic, reforms. It is also worth remembering that the West is not a monolithic entity. Facing the pressure from populists in a still complicated economic settings, governments in the EU countries have to to convince voters that their support for Ukraine is important. If reforms in Ukraine are successful, the population of other European countries will more readily agree to assisting Ukraine, which will make a favorable resolution of the conflict with Russia more likely.   Lead and innovate instead of repeating and copying?   As the authors remark, Ukraine’s resources, including human ones, are limited. Given the pressure from Russia and criticism from the populists, this does not leave much room for experiments. Hence the safest bet for Ukraine is to employ the recipes that other countries (not necessarily EU members) have successfully tested. Besides, innovation is always possible as the required changes are so massive while the settings are inevitably unique. Moreover, the IMF does not insist on implementing any specific model of reform. Its main message to Ukraine is not to postpone changes. For example, Mr Lipton says the following about the land reform, “The reform can be done in different ways, and there are different models and examples from different countries. What’s important is that there is land reform rather than no land reform.” Ukraine can thus offer various ways to reform itself to Western donors.   The balance of reforms should be determined by the people rather than by non-accountable NGOs or the West?   The Ukrainian people hardly exert effective and systematic influence on public policy. While hoping for a change for the better, the majority of the population remains politically passive. Most media outlets are dependent. Main political parties are based on personalities and interpersonal arrangements rather than on ideas and specific programs. It will take years for the status quo to change even if relevant political reforms are implemented. In these settings, NGOs is a channel through which the society can influence politicians – by means of pooling the country’s intellectual resources, creating alternatives for public policy, and controlling the authorities. Yet the authors clearly exaggerate this influence when they warn that no reformist NGO should have a monopoly over the reform agenda. At the same time, some of the authors’ comments are fair. NGOs have to ensure their transparency and work more actively with the population. However, politicians do not merely translate the public opinion into political decisions. Voters sometimes provide general guidelines, transferring the right to make decisions to politicians and expecting that the latter will improve public welfare. Linking each and every issue to the public opinion is tantamount to escaping from responsibility. If politicians always take the public opinion as an excuse, a good moment for change may never arrive. Influencing the public opinion through discussion and informing sometimes becomes part of a reform. It is complicated yet feasible. And here the state is much more powerful than reformist NGOs, which, the authors think, should focus on building public support for the reforms. In Mr Lipton’s words, “Ukraine must and can find a way for a public debate and consensus to get past rejection, shelving and blocking the reform. Again, it’s important to act rather than not act.” The authors caution Ukraine against turning into a client state of the West. Yet in the absence of reforms Ukraine will inevitably have to seek outside support over and over again. In Ukraine’s history, reforms have been much slower and less decisive than necessary. There is a risk that some of the much-needed reforms will be shelved again, as it happened after the Orange Revolution. When the society does not have sufficient influence on political decision-making, external stimuli can be decisive. For instance, it was the prospect of the visa-free regime with the EU that motivated Ukraine’s parliament to pass important anti-corruption measures. The reliance on Western aid can actually serve as a lever that frees the reformist politicians from the pressure of special interest groups.   The changes should be carefully crafted and implemented, so as to maintain government stability and national unity?   Sometimes, politicians should have the courage to take the steps that may seem unpopular. This would not necessarily lead to losing power. The failure to act may have even worse consequences. After all, no relation has been foundbetween reform and government instability. Economic performance is much more important. In fact, it is passivity and lack of reforms that eventually leads to economic downturn and to socio-economic instability. Besides, in Ukraine, opposition parties are likely to find many reasons for criticising the government anyway, given the strain that the conflict has put on the country’s economy and other long-standing problems. All the mentions of the “window of opportunities” is not just empty talk. Reforms, especially so massive, are more likely to succeed when implemented quickly. If one keeps insisting on a gradual approach, reform may not happen at all. Even necessary changes add to the public fatigue, prompt the opponents to organize, and threaten the unity within the government.   Conclusion   Russia’s aggression aims to weaken Ukraine, prevent it from succeeding, keep it isolated and under Russian control. This war is unlikely to be won exclusively by military means and will probably continue for quite some time in one form or another. Ukraine needs reforms to become stronger. The pressure of the West can help to circumvent the opposition of special interest groups, yet leaves much room for initiative and dialogue in Ukraine. Shelving the reforms because of the military conflict would ultimately play into the hands of Russia.     Sourse: https://voxukraine.org/2017/10/27/ukraine-reforming-a-country-in-war-is-difficult-but-there-is-no-other-way/

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NOLAN PETERSON The Daily Signal’s foreign correspondent based in Ukraine UGTI on Facebook Russia Field-Tested Hybrid Warfare in Ukraine. Why That Cyberthreat Matters for US KYIV, Ukraine—Since 2014 Russia has used Ukraine as a testing ground for its hybrid warfare doctrine, underscoring what some security experts say is a case study for the new kinds of security threats the U.S. and its Western allies can anticipate from Moscow. “The threats Ukraine faces are harbingers of things to come for the U.S. and its other allies,” said Junaid Islam, chief technology officer and president of Vidder, a California-based cybersecurity firm that does work in Ukraine. “It is in the national strategic interests of both the United States and Ukraine to cooperate deeply in cybersecurity because Ukraine is a canary in the cyberspace coal mine,” Islam told The Daily Signal. A top Ukrainian security official recently disclosed a cyberwarfare tactic honed by Russia in Ukraine, which could be a bellwether for Russia’s next act of political warfare against the U.S. The Ukrainian government recently has been attacked by “undetectable” computer viruses that target “particular individuals, in particular departments, and they’re constructed based on the social understanding of social media by particular people,” Dmytro Shymkiv, deputy head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine on Administrative, Social and Economic Reform, explained this month during the Future in Review conference in Park City, Utah. “Russia recruits psychiatrists, scientists, and neurologists, who construct these things to target particular individuals,” Shymkiv said. According to Ukrainian security officials, Russian agents build a psychological profile of their mark through his or her social media footprint. Then, using that information, the Russians can make personalized computer viruses, or run a social media influence operation specifically crafted with that one particular person in mind. “People say, ‘Well, that’s a science fiction.’ It’s not,” Shymkiv said. “When the annexation of Crimea took place, [Russia] shut down the internet to Ukraine, and they used social media to influence people’s behavior. And you can influence people’s behavior. You do it in a nice way, posting things to their friends, et cetera. There’s a whole factory in Russia doing this.” This is known in the cybersecurity world as “social engineering”—a form of cyberattack in which people are psychologically manipulated into performing actions or divulging confidential information. According to some security experts, the best defense against this kind of threat is education. “Man is the weakest link in the chain of information technology,” Mykhailo Vasyanovich, head of the Public Council for the Ministry of Information Policy of Ukraine, told The Daily Signal. “With such cyberattacks, which are now taking place in Ukraine, it is necessary to raise the level of information technology literacy of users by conducting educational work on cybersecurity among employees of private and state enterprises,” Vasyanovich said. Some experts worry this reliance on the security savvy of internet users to fend off Russian cyberattacks might be a vulnerability for the U.S. “What may especially worry the U.S. is that Russia targets influential individuals, such as journalists or political analysts, especially those of rather skeptical approach toward Moscow,” Daniel Szeligowski, senior research fellow on Ukraine for the Polish Institute of International Affairs, told The Daily Signal. “Unlike institutions or infrastructure, they don’t have state protection and are thus vulnerable to intimidation and blackmailing,” Szeligowski added. “And given the rising popularity of social media, such a threat is even more widespread.” Hybrid War Russia’s hybrid attacks against Ukraine have included, but are not limited to: • Using social media to shape public opinion among an adversary’s population. • Turning commercially available computer software into a tool for espionage and cyberwarfare. • Exploiting smartphones to spy on and wage psychological warfare against an adversary’s military forces. • Using cyberattacks to undermine an adversary’s electoral process. • Using pseudo-news reports to push a propaganda line that sows division within an adversary’s national culture. All of these tactics have also been used by Russia against the U.S. since Russo-American relations took a nosedive in the fallout over Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine in early 2014. “Ukraine is a perfect testing ground for hybrid warfare,” Szeligowski said. “Thus, it is no wonder that Russia has already seized the opportunity, and in Ukraine it has made a dry run of all sorts of its offensive techniques.” Russian hybrid warfare is not covert warfare. Rather, it’s the combined use of conventional military force with other means such as cyberattacks and propaganda to sow chaos and confusion—both on the battlefield and deep behind the front lines. Hybrid warfare is an evolving threat spanning every combat domain. Particularly, hybrid warfare weaponizes many pieces of everyday life, including smartphones, social media networks, commercially available computer software, and journalism. “Russia is testing in Ukraine both procedures and concepts, which later on are being applied in the West—such as during the U.S. and French elections,” a Polish security official told The Daily Signal on background, asking not to be named due to professional restrictions on speaking to the media. “In short, Ukraine remains for Russia a crucial hybrid warfare battleground and testbed,” the security official said. “The Russian hybrid warfare model is being further developed, perfected, and tested as we speak. Russia’s ability to escalate rapidly across the whole spectrum of conflict makes the West prone to the ‘surprise effect.’” Russia’s use of social media and cyberattacks as weapons of war might be innovative, but, at its core, it’s a modern revamp of a Cold War-era idea. Hybrid warfare is the Kremlin’s contemporary take on a Soviet military doctrine called “deep battle,” in which front-line combat operations are supported with operations to spread chaos and confusion deep within the enemy’s country. Hybrid warfare also draws on the Soviet Union’s well-documented history of “influence operations” against the U.S. and other Western allies. In effect, Russia’s overall strategy to undermine the West hasn’t changed all that much from the Soviet Union’s playbook. But the world in which those Soviet theories are now put into practice is a radically different one than during the Cold War. The advent of the internet, and social media in particular, has given the Kremlin direct access to the populations of its adversaries—bypassing the gatekeeper role America’s media institutions used to play. “Everything today is digitized, including phone and mail services, and everything runs on the same network,” Kenneth Geers, ambassador of NATO’s cybersecurity center and a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, told The Daily Signal. “There is only one internet, and one cyberspace, inhabited by all of the world’s citizens, soldiers, spies, and statesmen.” Meanwhile, Americans’ distrust in their media institutions has reached historic levels. Russia has stealthily taken advantage of Americans’ crisis of confidence in the media to permeate the U.S. news cycle with misinformation spread by propaganda mouthpieces cloaked as alternative news sources, such as RT and Sputnik. Lessons Learned Some commercial cybersecurity firms have stepped in both to harden Ukraine’s cyberdefenses and use lessons learned from Ukraine to craft better defenses for the U.S. to counter Russia. “With the world increasingly digital and connected, Ukraine is of strategic, vital interest to the West,” said Greg Ness, a cybersecurity specialist and vice president of marketing at Vidder. “What happens in Ukraine doesn’t stay in Ukraine.” California-based Vidder has put together a team of cybersecurity experts to comprise the core of a proposed U.S.-Ukraine cybersecurity center with offices in Kyiv, Washington, and Silicon Valley. “By ensuring that Ukraine adopts leading cybersecurity solutions and best practices, we will not only provide Ukraine with the best protection from cyberattacks, but it also helps U.S. experts develop new and more effective technologies and strategies in the future,” Islam, Vidder’s president, told The Daily Signal. “It will also help establish Ukraine as a secure, stable, prosperous, and reliable ally in Eastern Europe.” The war in Ukraine has shaped how NATO forces are training for the next military conflict. On Thursday, NATO and Ukraine launched a joint center to counter hybrid warfare. The center is part of the Comprehensive Assistance Package that NATO pledged to Ukraine during the alliance’s summit in Warsaw last year. According to NATO, the joint center will be “a platform for identifying lessons learned from hybrid war in Ukraine.” For its part, the U.S. military has reportedly been studying the war in Ukraine to shape its own military doctrine. Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, the Trump administration’s national security adviser, recently directed a study to analyze Russia’s hybrid warfare tactics in Ukraine in order to craft recommendations for the U.S. Army. Szeligowski added, however, that not all of Russia’s hybrid warfare tactics in Ukraine would be effective against the U.S. “There is a yawning gap between Ukrainian and American cyber capabilities, not to mention cultural and linguistic differences between Russians and Americans,” Szeligowski said. “But it goes beyond any doubt that, at least at some point, Russia already used hybrid warfare instruments against the U.S.—and did it effectively.” Hybrid Way of Life The effects of Russia’s proxy war against Ukraine are limited to a 250-mile-long static front line in southeastern Ukraine’s Donbas region. The war is moderated in intensity and is geographically frozen according to the rules of the February 2015 cease-fire deal, known as Minsk II. More than 10,100 Ukrainians have died so far in the war. The conflict has displaced about 1.7 million people. Yet, the physical consequences of the war are quarantined from most of the country. Outside the range of the artillery, mortars, rockets, and tank shots, you’d hardly know there was war going on. On a physical battlefield, a war extends as far as the range of the weapons used. In hybrid warfare, however, the battlefield knows no limit. Consequently, there’s hardly any part of Ukrainian life that hasn’t been affected by Russia’s ongoing hybrid war. Russian cyberattacks have hit Ukraine’s power grid, water supply systems, the country’s banking system (shutting down ATMs), its largest international airport, and the electoral process. In December 2016, a cyberattack, which Ukrainian officials attributed to Russia, took down one-fifth of Kyiv’s electrical grid. Since 2014, Ukrainian security services have thwarted numerous cyberattacks in which malware from abroad was used in attempts to steal classified information from Ukrainian government networks. In the eyes of Ukrainian security officials, the internet has become as much of a battlefield as the trenches in the Donbas region. The main goal of Russia’s information warfare, according to Ukrainian security officials, is to incite civil unrest throughout all of Ukraine and to undermine the government’s credibility. Since 2014, Ukraine has established a Situation Center for Cybersecurity, and Ukrainian officials have fostered closer ties to Western intelligence agencies to bolster their cyberdefenses. Security State Russia’s purchase of $100,000 worth of Facebook advertisements in the run-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election sparked a media frenzy in America and an outcry from lawmakers for social media sites to provide better transparency about the identity of those who purchase advertisements on their sites. In Ukraine, Russia has been exploiting social media as a weapon of war for years. In a sweeping ban announced in May, Ukrainian officials banned Russian internet search engines, including Yandex, as well as popular Russian social media sites such as VKontakte, which millions of Ukrainians used. The ban prompted some pushback from Ukrainians, who used these sites for many daily tasks and for social reasons. But Ukrainian officials insisted the sites posed a national security threat, which warranted the free speech trade-off. Also in May, Ukraine banned commercially available Russian software, including anti-virus software from Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab—the same company U.S. officials now say was used as a Trojan horse for Russian intelligence agencies to steal classified information from the U.S. government. “The risk that the Russian government, whether acting on its own or in collaboration with Kaspersky, could capitalize on access provided by Kaspersky products to compromise federal information and information systems directly implicates U.S. national security,” the Department of Homeland Security said in a Sept. 13 statement posted to its website. U.S. intelligence officials said Russian intelligence services had modified anti-virus software from Kaspersky Lab to clandestinely search computers around the world for classified U.S. government documents and top-secret information. “Possessing a worldwide deployment of sensors may be too great a temptation for any country’s intelligence service to ignore, and Kaspersky may have been forced into a quiet business partnership with the Russian government,” Geers, the NATO cybersecurity specialist, said. Similarly, news reports recently detailed how Russian military forces have been targeting the smartphones of NATO troops to gather intelligence. Ukrainian soldiers in the eastern war zone have long been advised by their leaders not to turn on their smartphones while in the war zone. Russian forces reportedly have used the cell signals emitting from Ukrainian soldiers’ phones to target its artillery. And for years Ukrainian soldiers have reported receiving death threats and demands for their surrender from their enemies over cellphone text messages. New Weapons Journalism has been one of Russia’s most lethal weapons against Ukraine. Ukrainian officials have banned a slew of Russian TV stations from broadcasting in Ukraine, and foreign journalists accused of spreading Russian propaganda have been booted out of the country. Anti-propaganda outlets in Ukraine such as StopFake.org also monitor media reports for Russian disinformation and are dedicated to setting the record straight. To counter Russian propaganda in the war zone, Ukraine’s government has rebuilt its TV and radio broadcast network in the east—which Russia and its separatist proxies destroyed in the opening days of the war. For years, Ukrainian citizens in eastern Ukraine could access only Russian TV channels for their news. Now, Ukraine has taken back control of the airwaves. While not as evident or as spectacular as the artillery bombardments and the tank battles, the battle for broadcast dominance in eastern Ukraine is a key piece of the overall war effort for Kyiv. After all, many Ukrainian citizens in eastern Ukraine can’t tell whether the artillery they are living under is fired from Ukrainian or Russian forces. And so long as they had access only to Russian television networks—which exclusively painted Ukrainian forces as the aggressor and, consequently, responsible for all civilian casualties—public opinion toward Ukraine’s central government was under an endless stress test as the war dragged on. Now, with Ukraine able to defend itself on the airwaves, Russia has lost a potent weapon to turn the citizens of eastern Ukraine against their own government. Similarly, U.S. lawmakers have debated how to defend the U.S. population against Kremlin-backed news outlets, including RT (formerly Russia Today) and Sputnik, which U.S. officials have called out as Russian propaganda mouthpieces. The FBI reportedly has turned to a U.S. law intended to prevent the spread of Nazi propaganda to determine whether the two Russian media outlets should register as foreign agents. In America, as has been the case in Ukraine, manipulation of the media by a foreign power increasingly is regarded as a hostile act warranting retaliation. “America has experienced a sustained attempt by a hostile power to feed and exploit our country’s division,” former President George W. Bush said in an Oct. 19 speech in New York. Russia “has made a project of turning Americans against each other,” Bush said, adding, “Foreign aggressions, including cyberattacks, disinformation, and financial influence, should never be downplayed or tolerated.”     Sourse: http://dailysignal.com/2017/10/27/russia-field-tested-hybrid-warfare-ukraine-cyberthreat-matters-us/

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JONATHAN LITTMAN Founder at SmartUp.life UGTI on Facebook How Ukraine’s Cyber Chief Can Help the US Beat Russia Welcome to the age of cyber warfare. “We are all easy to influence,” warned Dmytro Shymkiv, Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine and Secretary of Ukraine’s National Reforms Council, at the chilling start of a computer security panel at last week’s FiRe conference. “You can say we are not, that we know how to filter, but with three years of working on and facing this, anybody, including myself, is vulnerable to social influence on me, on my family, on my kids, on any of your friends.” The dangers are only going to increase, says Shymkiv, and companies or nations may not know what hit them until it’s too late. The latest threats, he says, are all but undetectable by traditional computer security methods. Our minds, elections and governments are being manipulated one keystroke at a time. And North Korea is considered to be a new looming threat. “Every day my team and I are responsible for cyber security in the [Ukrainian] Presidential Office, we see viruses that are not detectable,” said Shymkiv. “We’ve seen viruses which are targeting particular individuals, in particular departments, and they’re constructed based on the social understanding of social media by particular people.” These sorts of first-hand sci-fi glimpses of extraordinary developments right around the corner – some frightening, some hopeful, but all actionable – were what made the Future in Review (FiRe) conference in Park City, Utah a compelling event, a place where knowledge and access were intertwined, a world warp where you could not only meet influential international leaders like Shymkiv, but lunch or have a drink with a former top CIA technologist, renowned NASA scientist or elite computer geek. FiRe sparked conversations among people from vastly different disciplines. The intense, three-day symposium has a history of drawing big thinkers from diverse fields – deep science, medicine, computing, and finance – to share forecasts and critical insights on large scale issues. It’s a conference based on the premise that breakthroughs come when bright minds from all walks come together to make a difference. And perhaps no one was more forcefully driving the urgency of a needed dramatic change in global thinking and policy than Shymkiv. Ukraine: From the Front Line in the Cyberwars of the Future Shymkiv spoke of how in the last two years, Russia has been electronically spying on a wide swath of social media users comprising roughly half Ukraine’s population in a broad-based thought control program right out of Orwell’s 1984. “People say, ‘Well, that’s a science fiction.’ It’s not. When the annexation of Crimea took place, they [Russia] shut down the internet to Ukraine, and they used social media to influence people’s behavior. And you can influence people’s behavior. You do it in a nice way, posting things to their friends, et cetera. There’s a whole factory in Russia doing this.” Not only that, says Shymkiv, but a whole army of experts who are perfecting the engineering of a sophisticated underlying behavioral science that has magnified the potency of the assaults: “Russia recruits psychiatrists, scientists, and neurologists, who construct these things, to target particular individuals.” Shymkiv’s story could not have been more topical. Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg was in Washington, DC last week on a PR mission, attempting to deflect heat for the 3,000 Russia-linked Facebook ads her company recently turned over to congressional investigators. “We don’t want this kind of foreign interference,” Sandberg said. “These ads are divisive, and they are down, and the pages are down, because they are from fake accounts.” Facebook has faced mounting public criticism for failing to detect and prevent the election-influencing ads, which are expected to be released soon after a November 1 congressional hearing featuring Facebook, Twitter and Google. Facebook takes “enormous responsibility” for the Russian ad scandal, Sandberg said: “Things happened on our network during the election that should not have happened.” Sandberg might have learned a thing or two had she attended the FiRe conference and met Shymkiv and other experts. Bob Flores, who once held the title of Chief Technology Officer at the Central Intelligence Agency, and is now a co-founder and partner at Cognitio Corp., led the panel on Russia’s Infowar Machines and noted that Ukraine has been and will continue to be on the front lines in the cyberwars of the future “because these tactics have a way of evolving from the testing ground, into Western Europe and the United States.” The Petya Virus and the Campaign for a Global ID Exhibit A should give everyone pause: this summer’s Petya virus attack. Tax time in the US is often dreaded. But in Ukraine this June, said Shymkiv, summer tax software turned deadly. Hundreds of thousands of companies, and the computers of CFOs and chief accountants within the ministry of finance had been receiving tax software updates with a dastardly, hidden time bomb. “Within the code that’s been distributed to these computers, they’ve [Russia] been extracting financial information and digital signatures, and hell knows what,” said Shymkiv. “And then, in the classic Soviet style, when the Soviets robbed the villages in Ukraine, during hunger times, they burned the buildings, the villages. So, they decided to bring a virus that burned these PCs. It was constructed in a way so that it spreads through all the organization within an hour.” The supposed ransomware element was false. “If you didn’t switch off your computer within an hour, your computer became a brick.” Pulling the plug would have helped, said Shymkiv, but most victims were too dazed to move fast. “Within the first hours, the top major companies in Ukraine lost almost 90% of their infrastructure.” Petya wreaked havoc worldwide, striking hospitals, governments and companies hard (Fed-Ex alone recently tallied its losses at $300 million) and Shymkiv said it may be only the start. “Yesterday we talked about personalized medicine,” he said, referring to Leroy Hood’s keynote on how we could use technology to end disease and solve the healthcare crisis. “Now we’re seeing personalized viruses.” Firewalls or classical defense infrastructures won’t be sufficient” to protect us. Project StopFake Fights Russian Lies During a week when the hit animation show South Park brutally mocked Zuckerberg for profiting from fake news, and Sandberg was essentially lobbying Congress to avoid future regulation, Shymkiv was taking the long view. He pointed out that Ukraine was one of the first to create a team of journalists to spot and debunk fake news before it further threatens democracy. StopFake.org, an inspired group of Ukrainian digital journalism students on a mission to expose “untruthful information about events in Ukraine” rose to the challenge during Russian’s brutal Crimean annexation, and have so far identified more than 1,000 Russian-engineered fake news stories. Incredibly, StopFake was launched in the spring of 2014, two full years before Russia began manipulating the US presidential election process, tainting Facebook and Twitter with fake news. Surrounded by journalists after his FiRe talk, Shymkiv said far more can be done. “We’re still formulating, with fake news spreading, how it gets disseminated. It’s interesting to analyze the flows, to analyze through what critical points in the past fake news went, and who are the spreading points. And this analysis can be done. It’s basic tools. Can the social media companies do it? Yes, they can.” So far, Facebook, Twitter and other social media companies have dragged their feet, appearing to have chosen profit over transparency. By making it easy for nefarious entities to exploit anonymity or introduce bots, traffic has been falsely inflated, leading to an increase in earnings. It’s not in the social media giants’ commercial interest to deny access to bots or Russian operatives. “The main mistakes of social media have been not putting together basic rules for validation of identity,” said Shymkiv. Shymkiv is a proponent of a form of “Global ID” in which personal identity is protected. Opponents charge that stringent identification controls would contradict the “free internet” but Shymkiv points out that when lives are at risk we accept tradeoffs. For example, he doesn’t mind being searched getting onto an airplane, because that extra step is necessary to prevent terrorism. Shymkiv’s dedication is clear. He was the CEO of Microsoft Ukraine when his president called upon him to join his nation’s government after Russian’s annexation of Crimea. Drawing from his deep technology background and astute understanding of social media, he’s been working closely with the Ukrainian cyber police to improve security. “It’s a friendly conversation. They’re trying to follow the physical world, while in the cyber world things are much faster. And the challenge for law enforcement is exactly that, how to do things [and prevent crimes] and not violate individual freedoms. But it’s a joint consent. We’ll become more cautious with all the things that are happening around us. We need [the tragedy of] 9-11, we need the shooting in the Las Vegas, we need all these things happening in France and Germany, or Ukraine. We need all these things to finally realize that we need to start changing some policies.” “But countries will not be able to do it alone,” said Shymkiv. “It’s not the governments, but society that needs to start pulling it together. About the Conference The Future in Review (FiRe) conference has long influenced thought leaders from diverse disciplines. Now in its 15thyear, this four-day crash-course networking bonanza is not just another tech conference crammed with entrepreneurs seeking to attract venture capital. Rather, it’s a chance to meet, share ideas, and solve problems with some of today’s most important technologists and scientists shaping the future. The conference is masterminded by futurist Mark Anderson, Founder and CEO of Strategic News Service (SNS) and publisher of the weekly SNS Global Report on technology and the global economy (www.stratnews.com), read by Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and other major tech moguls. This year’s conference started on a hopeful note. Health was a central emphasis. Not just the health of our data and supercomputing network systems, but the health of our planet and bodies. In his insightful keynote on “The End of Disease: Solving the Healthcare Crisis,” Leroy Hood, President and Co-Founder, Institute for Systems Biology; and SVP and Chief Science Officer, Providence Health & Services, spoke of personalized medicine, and how through monitoring our wellness we can stave off or even prevent disease, thereby extending our biological youth. Critical needs in cybersecurity and IP protection were another central focus, from risk analysis to breach protection. Security experts such as Robert Loeb, Solution Architect of enterprise cyber security firm Micro Focus, discussed the implications of the upcoming GDPR compliance standard stipulating that by 2018, any company with EU-based customers needs to implement far more identity protection than currently practiced in the US. IP theft by China was another big theme, covered in depth by Evan Anderson and Richard Marshall. Berit Anderson, CEO and Editor-in-Chief of Scout.ai, detailed Cambridge Analytica’s insidious social media manipulations in the 2016 US presidential election, during her “Computational Propaganda” session with BBC World News Service podcaster Ed Butler. The FiReFilms program tapped attendees’ emotions with several captivating film trailers, and filmmaker interviews. A screening of “Chasing Coral” educated conference attendees on the devastation of the world’s coral ecosystem through global warming. (Just last year, for instance, a third of the coral in the Great Barrier Reef died.) Fighting disease, including heroin addiction, was another focus, covered in Jenny Mackenzie’s documentary “Dying in Vein”, and Katia Moritz’s film “Undiagnosed: Medical Refugees”, which addressed the plight of individuals who suffer from mysterious diseases. Pattern recognition and large-scale image and data processing, and computing power is another looming sea change in technology as we know it. Larry Smarr, the founding director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), a UC San Diego/UC Irvine partnership, led panels and workshops in “Century-Scale Breakthroughs: Biology Driving Pictorial Supercomputing” and the FiRe CTO Design Challenge, “Comparative Image Computing: Creating the First Pictorial Processing System.” During the last hours of the conference, a team of technologists worked through the night to prototype a new computer systems architecture to better anticipate and respond to everything from natural disasters to fake news. For more about next year’s conference, visit The Future in Review. Sourse: http://smartup.life/how-ukraines-cyber-chief-can-help-the-us-beat-russia/?utm_source=FIRE2018&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=FiRe+2018%3A+Early+Bird+Registration+Extended

"Ukraine starts eighth round of talks on FTA with Turkey"

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"Ukrainian, Canadian space agencies to sign bilateral document on cooperation"

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25 October, 2017

"Ukraine moves up to 76th position in Doing Business ranking"

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"Korean company interested in building grain complex in Chornomorsk port"

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24 October, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Cybersecurity Center Cybersecurity Center The relative lack of investment in technology and cybersecurity over the past decade in Ukraine means Ukrainian business and government largely skipped a generation of cybersecurity solutions, most of which have proven ineffective against emerging state-sponsored attacks. That is the bad news. The good news is Ukraine is ready to modernize and capable of mounting an effective defense with help from allies. Providing this help is in the national strategic interests of Ukraine as well as the United States because Ukraine is a canary in the cyber-space coal mine. The threats Ukraine faces are harbingers of things to come for the US and its allies. By ensuring that Ukraine adopts leading cybersecurity solutions and best practices we will not only provide Ukraine with the best protection from cyber-attacks, but it also helps US experts develop new and more effective technologies and strategies in the future. It will also help establish Ukraine as a secure, stable, prosperous and reliable ally in Eastern Europe. To achieve these objectives, we propose a US-Ukraine Cybersecurity Policy and Research Center (the “Center”) with offices in Kyiv, DC and Silicon Valley to both quickly and efficiently create a digital environment wherein communications are secure, critical infrastructure is protected and businesses and trade can thrive. We believe that a public-private partnership is the appropriate structure for the Center, which will draw participants from US and Ukrainian companies as well as government (including, perhaps, the State Service of Special Communication and Information Protection of Ukraine, the National Security Council of Ukraine, the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate). With these various stakeholders working together, the Center will: • Develop policy recommendations as well as engage in collaborative research and development projects to improve the level of cybersecurity in critical systems necessary to the security and stability of Ukraine. • Focus on helping the Ukrainian government, military and private sector to solve difficult cybersecurity problems while gaining agility and cutting costs. • Take an agnostic, best practices approach to ensuring that Ukrainian companies are provided the best possible solutions to resolve their cybersecurity needs. • Become largely self-sustaining. Several key stakeholders and experts in Ukraine as well as the United States (DC as well as Silicon Valley) have committed to support developing, establishing and operating the Center and we will provide updates they become available over the coming weeks.

"Kernel to increase EBITDA by 1.6 times by 2021 FY"

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"Poroshenko calls to accelerate process of formation of united territorial communities"

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23 October, 2017

"Ukraine, Poland sign memo of cooperation in building via carpatia highway "

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"Some 154 more Ukrainian goods are exported to Canada"

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21 October, 2017

"U.S. envoy Volker to visit Ukraine Oct 27 "

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"Stoltenberg announces dates for next NATO summit"

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20 October, 2017

"Economic Development Ministry: Ukraine’s exports to EU four times larger than exports to Russia"

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"Some 98% of customs declarations filed in electronic form"

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19 October, 2017
PAVLO IVASHCHENKO Director of "Institute of Geophysics and problems of Earth "Ltd UGTI on Facebook HOW TO QUICKLY IDENTIFY AND RELIABLY SURVEY DEPOSITS Hundreds of oil and gas companies in the world annually go into the red by drilling "empty" wells onshore and offshore. Many times bigger losses are in the lost profit, which could be given by discovered fields. The same, but more dramatic situation occurs with the development of underground fresh water, especially in arid regions. It's not just business in here, but also the health and life of people. What is the problem of exploration activity? The main problem is that the most of methods of geophysics conformto the patternof "interpretation of indirect physical parameters" that native to the target minerals. So there is no direct identification of a specific hydrocarbon or other mineral. As a result, the reliability of such tests leaves a lot to be desired. The Ukrainian company "Institute of Geophysics and Earth Problems", Ltd., has developed and successfully applies innovative resonant technology (IRT) of spectral-resonant (remote) and magnetic resonance (on-site) survey of territories. This technology refers to the "direct" methods of exploration activity and conform to the pattern of "direct identification of the chemical composition" of the minerals. The main idea of such a pattern is use of the phenomenon of resonance as the principle for the identification of minerals. More detailsabout the theoretical basis, problems and specifics of the technical feasibility of the ITR can be found inour article in the European scientific journal "Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI)" (Copernicus): https://www.geosci-instrum-method-data-syst.net/5/551/2016/gi-5-551-2016.pdf The technology is patented in Germany and Ukraine, tested in the USA and Russia, successfully applied on various continents for remote search of minerals. We suggest that you consider the possibility of applying IRT in various territories (land and shelf) for solving different problems of search and inspection of hydrocarbon deposits, underground fresh water and other minerals. Advantages of technology: - quick survey of both small and large territories on land and sea; - high reliability of hydrocarbon identification, more than 90%; - relatively low cost of work. The conducted works are completely safe for humans and the environment. We can: - promptly identify and determine deposits at the regional stage; - detailed survey of area and detected deposits, providing data on topography of deposits, number and thickness of horizons, presence of gas caps and pressure in them, the deep sections of deposits and the calculation of predicted resources; - test location designed for drilling. To keeping data current and determine the optimal drilling location, we can offer on-site measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance to depths of 5 km or more. The time required for testing and reporting is 1 to 2 months. Above we talked about customer interaction over services of IRT. However, other, much more effective business forms of mutual cooperation are possible. One of these directions is partner business project “Find, drill and sell a deposit”. The main idea of the project is reflected in its title: “Find, drill and sell a deposit”. In fact we offer to radically reduce time of detection and deposit survey, substantially decrease financial expense on ‘entry’ and preparation of detected deposits for sale, thus providing the super high profitability of the project. The survey area decreases successively, from stage to stage (Fig.3) by means of locating of deposit contours, which allows to substantially shorten the survey time and financial expenses on geophysics. The total time of project execution, including simultaneous carrying of basic works, is 1 year. The outcome of project implementation (profit) can be thousands of percent. We believe that application of the innovative technology can bring economic benefit to your company which can be achieved within the shortest period of time.   PAVLO IVASHCHENKO Autor PhD Professor in Technical Sciences, associate professor. Is an active member of Georgian National Academy   TATIANA TAVORSKAYA Author assistance in preparing the article.

"Kernel secures $200 mln credit line"

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"KSG Agro launches two biofuel BOILER houses in Dnipropetrovsk Region schools"

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18 October, 2017

"Ukraine may get IMF tranche by end of this year - NBU"

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"UAE, Kyiv to develop cooperation in tourism and advertising"

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17 October, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukrainian Dream - Economic Renaissance of Ukraine The sixth Festival of the Innovative Projects "Sikorsky Challenge 2017" started in Kyiv. Every year it is held by the National Technical University of Ukraine "Kyiv Polytechnic Institute named after Igor Sikorsky" - the leader of startup innovations in Ukraine (new promising projects in various scientific fields). Traditionally, within the framework of the festival, there is an all-Ukrainian Competition of Startups, where the developers and representatives of a large business investment meet. One of the features of the contest is that domestic and foreign businessmen sit on the jury. They vote for a particular project only if they are willing to invest their own money in it. The festival "Sikorsky Challange" is the most significant event in the field of innovative technologies. This year, people's deputies of Ukraine - Sergiy Taruta and Alexander Danchenko were its participants. The last one was a student of the capital "polytechnics", and now he is a member of the jury of the festival and the head of the Verkhovna Rada Committee on Informatization and Communications. - In 2012, when the competition of startups was held for the first time, only two projects received investments for total cost $22,000, - said Mikhail Zgurovsky, rector of the KPI named after Igor Sikorsky. - And already in 2015, $26 million was invested in 23 innovative projects. The sensation of the festival was the news about the creation of a whole system for the realization of Ukrainian inventors’ creative ideas. Thus, under the "KPI" a scientific park was opened, where the winners of the startup competition can realize their projects with the support of grant and venture funds. At the same time, the state does not stand aside, but begins to take the first steps to introduce the valuable ideas of the local “Kulibins” into life. "Now we face the task of creating an innovative ecosystem under the KPI," said Vladimir Stavnyuk, the Chairman of the Board of the State Finance Institution for Innovations (SFII) at the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade of Ukraine. - Why is it important? For example, there is a technology park (the same ecosystem) at Jagiellonski University in Krakow, that provides employment for 150,000 people. True, Poland invests 4 billion euros annually in its startups. Unfortunately, today Ukraine can not make big financial injections into innovative development. But we offer an alternative - a mechanism to support foreign investors. "If scientific ideas are supported by the state and large foreign investors, it can increase the GDP growth from today's 4% to 50%," Mikhail Zgurovsky said, the rector of the KPI named after Igor Sikorsky. - Therefore, together with our partner Henry Shterenberg, president of the American company UGTI Inc., we are developing a fundamentally new concept of cooperation with foreign companies. Henry Shterenberg takes the mission of an operator to attract foreign companies that will invest in Ukrainian startups and bring them to the international market. The help of UGTI is very important, because there is a mental gap between Western and Ukrainian business cultures. To overcome this gap UGTI will act as an intermediary, whose task is to explain to foreign investors how to work in Ukraine, and to prepare our startups for cooperation with foreign businessmen. - Among countries with emerging economies Ukraine is the most attractive for foreign investors, - the president of the American company UGTI explains, he is a Ukrainian by origin. - First of all it is because of its intellectual fund - "golden heads". However, I consider my task not only to attract foreign cash flows to Ukraine, but also to help the country where I was born and raised to make an economic breakthrough. That is why I begin the implementation of my global project "Ukrainian Dream" - this is the plan for the economic renaissance of the country on the basis of technological, engineering, and scientific resources. I am convinced that Ukraine can dominate in the world in 24 economic and scientific areas. It is only necessary to create conditions for the development and support of the intellect of Ukrainians. --- Author: Pavel Nek Source: http://vremya.eu/novosti/novosti-biznesa/genri-shterenberg-prezntoval-ukrainskuyu.html

"Association of Japanese Entrepreneurs in Ukraine mulling investing in Odesa region"

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"EBRD considers introduction of auctions to stimulate renewable energy sources for Ukraine to be promising"

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16 October, 2017

"Finance Minister Danyliuk: World Bank president to visit Ukraine next month"

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"Ukrainian Finance Minister says that progress has been made in negotiations with IMF on gas tariffs in Ukraine"

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14 October, 2017

"Association of Japanese Entrepreneurs in Ukraine mulling investing in Odesa region"

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"SBU warns of possible large-scale cyber attack"

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13 October, 2017

"Denmark interested in cooperation with Ukraine within Energy Efficiency Fund – Zubko"

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"Ukraine PM confident of receiving new IMF tranche -agency"

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12 October, 2017
MYROSLAVA HARTMOND Managing Director at Triptych: Global Arts Workshop (Ukraine) UGTI on Facebook The world has much to learn from Ukraine’s story, and we can use culture to package this message attractively for a global audience FALLEN: A research exhibition with a mission This year, as the world takes stock of the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917, I am co-curating ‘FALLEN. Revolution – Propaganda - Iconoclasm’, a research exhibit at a leading British university that looks at the rise and fall of Lenin’s cult of personality --- and Ukraine’s role in its unmaking. Iconic works by Alexander Rodchenko, Gustav Klutsis and Sergei Eisenstein centre around a 4 metre long 1:1 scale model of Lenin’s finger from the 100m high sculpture proposed for the Palace of the Soviets that serves to remind us of the absurdity of the Soviet Union’s ruling elite’s ambition. The exhibition also features original artworks, sculptures, and propaganda posters from the Soviet period, as well as contemporary photography by Niels Ackermann and Donald Weber. Empty plinths persist as stark reminders of the absence of totalitarian rule, becoming points of convergence for contending visions of national representation, posing the question: ‘What next?’ As photographer Weber reminds us, ‘History hates empty pedestals’. From the exhilaration of the early Soviet years, to the systematic imposition of a personality cult that was used to enforce the will of the Communist Party, FALLEN documents the inglorious fate of the Soviet Union’s deification of Lenin. Propaganda paintings, photography, posters and film investigate the glorification of Lenin, first by Stalin to consolidate his power and then by the Communist Party who recognised the potency of art as a political weapon. FALLEN is accompanied by a public programme that expand on ideas raised in the show, including talks by Dawn Ades, Owen Hatherley, my fantastic co-curator Jess Twyman and myself, and a film screening led by John Haynes, while University’s Arts Outreach team respond with a Family Day. --- VIDEO: FALLEN Exhibition Tour by Myroslava Hartmond (Art Exchange, UoE) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctt1wgZGcGw&lc=z23ii51zwmyhufoj504t1aokgofufq3qfjyla1ldwy1bbk0h00410   What can Ukraine’s ‘Leninfall’ teach the West? Ukraine’s decommunization process, which took many forms since the first Lenin was toppled in the wake of the Euromaidan protests in December 2013, has been both widely supported and harshly criticized. However, it has certainly not gone unnoticed, and Ukraine can capitalize on this heightened visibility to share its experience of rethinking the symbolic landscape of its public spaces. Today, not a single Lenin statue remains standing on its pedestal in Ukraine. Order No. 200, issued on 4th April 2016 by the Ministry of Culture, stripped 794 cultural objects in 13 Ukrainian regions of their ‘heritage’ status, including ‘monuments to V. Lenin, M. Frunze, F. Dzerzhynskiy, S. Kirov and other perpetrators of the totalitarian propaganda of the Soviet regime.’ Their various fates are the subject of ‘Looking for Lenin’, a book by Niels Ackermann and Sébastien Gobert, to which I contributed an introductory essay. Some have been stored away by the authorities, others removed from their original spot and laid out, some are broken, tampered with beyond recognition, while others – such as Oleksandr Milov’s Darth Vader – have been upcycled and have even featured in international news. Ukraine’s Leninfall has perhaps more in common with the Rhodes Must Fall campaign in South Africa and Oxford, UK, or the removal of Confederate monuments in the US earlier this year than it does with its own early waves of Soviet monument disposal, where the sentiment of banishing the symbols of Communism was the immediate concern of a newly-independent state (and not a symbolic war against a past that has since become history). While Western democracies have shied away from recreating the likenesses of their leaders in durable materials (at least on an industrial scale!), we have nonetheless seen in recent years a heightened awareness of the statuary and symbols that populate our public spaces. It is for this reason that we can garner much insight from the recent experience of a contemporary European state that has many layers of history beneath its surface. The empty plinths that litter the towns and villages of Ukraine today, much like the stumps of felled trees, ask the question: what next? Weber’s work exposes the ugliness of the ‘decommunized’ landscape, purged of Lenin and yet devoid of signs of development. Scrawled with slogans in one instance, damaged beyond repair in another, the empty plinths point to the drabness of their surroundings. No longer ‘colonized’ by Lenin, the vacant pedestal becomes an arena for contending visions of national representation. We hope that this exhibition will help to write Ukraine into the historic context of the Russian Revolution Centenary, and draw much-needed parallels between its contemporary challenges and the heritage debates that take place in the West today.     FALLEN Revolution – Propaganda - Iconoclasm 16 September – 4 November 2017 Art Exchange, University of Essex, Colchester campus More information about the exhibition can be found here. http://www.artexchange.org.uk/exhibition/fallen

"Iran, Ukraine to Form Joint Economic Commission"

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"Ukroboronprom hopes to expand military cooperation with U.S. amid hybrid war"

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11 October, 2017

"GUAM member countries agree on free-trade zone"

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"Ukrainian space industry enterprises loaded by a third in h1 2017"

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10 October, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Dentons Global Public Procurement Insights Webinar: Ukraine Thank you to anyone who was able to join me, John Herbst (US Ambassador to Ukraine from 2003–2006 and current Director of the Atlantic Council's Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center) and Dentons partners Mark Meagher and Markian Silecky on September 28, 2017 for our webinar discussing Ukraine's business climate, and opportunities and challenges for US and other foreign companies doing business or interested in doing business there. If you were unable to join the webinar live, this is your lucky day! Please find a copy of our presentation and a link to the video of the webinar below. PRESENTATION https://gallery.mailchimp.com/fc2ded176309d46ef7deb2bac/files/eaf9e5d4-b55d-487f-ab06-409f0cf18f7b/Public_Procurement_Insights_Webinar_Ukraine_105296514_1_.pdf   VIDEO https://dentons2.adobeconnect.com/pzpufpflllh3/

"EU Ambassador to Ukraine backs improvement of business climate for attracting investment"

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"Ukraine intends to finish cooperation program with IMF in 2018"

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9 October, 2017

"Ukraine’s barley exports to China 87% up from last year"

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"Erdogan arrives for talks with Poroshenko"

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7 October, 2017

"Ukraine to host NATO PA session for the first time in 2020"

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"Trade volume between Ukraine and Moldova increased by more than 30% - Moldovan PM"

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6 October, 2017

"Trump urged to give Ukraine weapons – NYT"

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"Rada ratifies agreement with U.S. on restoration of cooperation in science and technology"

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5 October, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine - Sikorsky Challenge - Innovations & Start Ups I been in Ukraine for almost 2 months now. It is the longest single visit since me and my family left the Soviet Union back in 1989. A lot of things changed. There is no way to qualify the excitement I personally feel about the future and economic potential of Ukraine. No, I am not referring to 2% to 3% GDP growth that being projected by the government. Such growth with inflation over 14% is a slow road to economic cemetery. I am excited about what we call "Economic Renaissance of Ukraine" based on Scientific fields of 21st century. UGTI team identified 23 scientific fields of 21st Century. We believe Ukraine has opportunity to be in the top 3 world-wide in each one of the fields. Only INTELLECT of the Ukrainians can give country sustainable annual GDP growth of 10% for forceable future. Technologies of each scientific fields we identified is in high demand around the world. Each field has opportunity to grow into multi billion dollar industry for Ukraine. For this to happen it is essential that Government, Academia and Business of Ukraine work in collaboration to achieve ultimate benefits for the people of Ukraine. Sikorsky Challenge today represents a major step in the right direction. It is a fundamental block for prosperous future. I am honored to be one of the SPEAKERS at the event. During the event, I will announce our global program "Ukrainian Dream - Economic Renaissance of Ukraine" Please see attached Sikorsky Challenge Program - I hope to see you there.   https://gallery.mailchimp.com/fc2ded176309d46ef7deb2bac/files/8efd5ab8-fe1e-486e-b0cb-de811326cebd/Program_of_the_Final_Startup_Competition_October__10_13__2017_f1.pdf

"General Electric to help modernize Ukrainian railways"

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"Iran takes interest in Ukrainian agriculture"

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4 October, 2017

"EBRD: Placement of $3 billion Eurobonds is significant Ukraine’s success"

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"Government budgets UAH 1 billion to finance Affordable Medicines program next year"

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3 October, 2017
ALEXANDER MARKUS Chairman of the German-Ukrainian Chamber of Industry & Commerce UGTI on Facebook Ukraine's investment boom starting Ukraine could be entering the golden age of investment and not yet know it. At least that is what Alexander Markus, chairman of the German-Ukrainian Chamber of Industry & Commerce, thinks. Alexander Markus, leader of the 105-member association, said that he sees similarities between today’s Ukraine and Poland as it was in 2001 — three years before Ukraine’s smaller but richer western neighbor joined the European Union and NATO. Germany didn’t take the competitive threat of Poland seriously back then, but has since learned that Polish business “is very competitive, especially in the food processing area,” Markus said, and that Poland is also ahead of Germany in some ways. “Germans only noticed the Polish boom afterwards,” he said. “Ukraine is undergoing a situation like Poland did 15–20 years ago. It’s very much the same today. Poland is actually a manufacturing platform for the European Union … Ukraine will go the same way in the future.” In a Sept. 27 interview with the Kyiv Post, Markus described a largely silent investment boom under way in parts of Ukraine, led by German and other investors, and not completely reflected in official statistics. Top German sector “Our estimate is that we have 30,000 workplaces in central and western Ukraine just in the German automotive component industry,” Markus said. “Nobody knows about this. We have a huge problem that Ukraine doesn’t tell enough about itself in Western Europe.” And, in some cases, German companies like to stay silent about their successes in Ukraine to keep away competitors. “If you found the golden spot, would you go home and tell about this?” Markus asked. “You aren’t crazy, are you?” He said some German companies have hired scouts to explore the regions of Ukraine, looking for promising new places to open factories or plants because of a developing shortage of qualified labor in western Ukraine. He expects that, as Ukraine’s roads and other infrastructure improve, companies will migrate from western to central Ukraine. Decentralization a plus He said that decentralization of government is a big plus for economic development because it forces regional governments to compete with each other for private investment. “Decentralization is the best thing that can happen in Ukraine,” Markus said. “Let’s say I’m building a new plant in the region. I get all my permits on the spot. The head of the (local government) administration understands that I will pay taxes, everything ‘white.’ I pay everything officially. He is struggling to support me because he understands that if he can’t convince me this is the right spot, I’m moving to the neighboring region. Decentralization is a good mechanism, and it works.” Biggest investors Possibly the biggest German employer in Ukraine, with 8,000 people in two plants, is Kromberg & Schubert, which makes complex wire cable networks for Germany’s vaunted car manufacturing industry. Kromberg & Schubert have plants in Lutsk and Zhytomyr. But close behind is LEONI, another Germany automotive components manufacturer, which will open its second Ukrainian plant, in Kolomyia, adding to a workforce that includes 7,000 employees in its plant in Stryi, a Lviv Oblast city of 61,000 people near the western border. Two other giants among German businesses in Ukraine are: Metro Cash & Carry, the Dusseldorf-based food and retail giant, which has invested an estimated $500 million; and Knauf, the Iphofen-based manufacturer of drywall and other building construction materials, which has invested an estimated $350 million. A strong component of German investment in Ukraine is at the smaller end. Estimates of the number of German businesses in Ukraine range from 1,200, according to the Germany Embassy, to at least 2,000 active companies, by Markus’ estimate. Of the German-Ukrainian Chamber of Industry & Commerce’s 105 members, Markus classifies 2/3 as middle-to-large companies and 1/3 in the small business category. The organization gets 40 percent of its funding from the German Ministry of Economy and Energy and the rest from membership dues and service fees. Any business operating in Ukraine is eligible for membership. Currently, 70 percent are German companies, 20 percent are Ukrainian, and 10 percent are from other European countries. Studied Russian Markus first arrived in Ukraine in 2006, working in private business development for the European Commission, and stayed for 18 months. “I liked it quite a lot,” he said. He became deputy head of the German-Russian Chamber of Industry and Commerce in Moscow, where he worked for nearly four years before returning to Kyiv in 2011. From the Lower-Saxony region of northern Germany, Markus has a degree in business administration and also studied the Russian language. Improve image, brand Ukraine needs to change its image — and, in part, its reality — of a corrupt country with big security risks. “Ukraine is not telling the Ukrainian story in Germany, or not enough,” Markus said. “You hear much more about the Ukrainian story from other countries telling the Ukrainian story in Germany,” including Russia. And it’s hurting business. Markus recalled one German automotive component producer telling President Petro Poroshenko that he could build an additional three or four plants in Ukraine, but automobile manufacturing customers in Germany “do not allow having more projects in Ukraine because of the image of Ukraine, and because the security evaluation is too bad,” even though western Ukraine is 1,000 kilometers from the Russian war front. Markus said that Ukraine needs to be much more active in other areas, including product branding and promoting its strengths abroad. He is a strong proponent of Ukrainian-German cooperation at the regional, rather than capital, levels. He also said that private business, not government, should drive the development agenda. The next step for private companies is to organize at the regional level and develop cluster initiatives to share experience. “That’s how we’re doing industrial development in western Germany,” Markus said. “It’s not for state to decide what is to be developed. The state is not expert enough in this area.” Moreover, he said, the Ukrainian government simply doesn’t have the money to fund an export promotion program “with billions of hryvnia in the nearest future.” Ukraine also needs to develop stronger brands for finished food products, where higher profit margins are made, rather than simply relying on exporting less profitable raw commodities. Early opportunities Many German companies came to Ukraine more than a decade ago, long before Ukraine’s free trade agreement with the EU, which only went into effect this year, and they stayed. They saw the opportunities early: low production costs, an EU border and wage levels “even more than 10 times cheaper” in some areas than in the EU. Holding back new German investors is “a very difficult security situation and political situation,” Markus said. “In German business, long-term planning is very important. If they are not sure they can plan for 15–20 years, they might not come in.” But those who dared to come to Ukraine are feeling good. “What we see today is that the existing German investors are expanding and building new plants,” he said. “The mood is absolutely optimistic,” he said, fueled by a 25 percent increase in German exports to Ukraine in the last year. The character of Ukraine-German trade is also encouraging. While Russia mainly exports oil and gas to Germany, Ukraine’s exports are more diversified — led by auto components, agricultural commodities, foodstuffs and so on. And German investment in Ukraine and Russia is also different. German businesses are investing in Russia just to sell inside the country while, in Ukraine, “companies that are investing here are investing to export — to get the higher value added in the EU.” Consequently, manufacturing from Ukraine aimed at the EU market “has to be much higher quality” to meet standards. German automakers, for instance, allow “no more than five parts per million in damaged products” in components. “It is one of the highest quality standards worldwide, and this is made in Ukraine.” German exports to Ukraine are led by advanced engineering, which is an encouraging sign about Ukraine. “This shows that Ukrainian industry is modernizing and buying high-end German engineering products,” he said. Challenges ahead In food, for instance, Germans are “importing more at a cheaper price. That is something Ukraine has to work on. A major task for Ukraine should be not only to deliver half-ready goods that will be processed or packaged in plants in Germany, but to develop their own brands,” Markus said. “The (highest profit) margin is in the last meters.” While low production costs and borders with the EU are advantages, Markus said that Ukraine must do more to implement the free trade agreement to realize its advantages. For instance, he said, “there is no single accredited food laboratory in Ukraine. Every food certificate to import to EU standard has to be done by a laboratory in the European Union. It’s ridiculous.” In another example, he said that Cologne, Germany, each year holds one of the largest international exhibitions on food products and only last year, for the first time, did a Ukrainian representative attend. Ukraine should make regular appearances, he said, in Germany’s regions. “It is not enough to go to Berlin,” he said. “Real business in Germany is not in the capital.” German approach German businesses, he said, have mostly succeeded in avoiding Ukraine’s powerful billionaire oligarchs because the capitalists from his homeland are investing directly, rather than becoming financial investors or buying shares and forming joint-stock companies. “They have a business idea and have a business model,” Markus said. “They are investing 100 percent on their own.” To do so, they need a land plot, legal framework, source materials, infrastructure, good workforce and markets. They are not working in areas where the oligarchs are so interested.” Estimates of Germany’s foreign direct investment vary significantly, from $1.7 billion to $3.8 billion. One reason is that some of the investment isn’t being counted by Ukraine, Markus said. He knows companies that supply additives to make food tastier and other products. Some of those companies reported 30 percent growth last year in the food processing industry. The numbers don’t show up in official statistics often because “the middle Ukrainian entrepreneur doesn’t report the real figures,” Markus said. “The major strategy is duck and cover. ‘I will not be seen because somebody might knock on the door.’ That’s why we may not see the boom.” Written by By Brian Bonner   Source: https://www.kyivpost.com/business/alexander-markus-ukraine-investment-boom-starting.html

"Economy Ministry to set up ad hoc group to increase trade between Ukraine and U.S."

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"Windkraft Ukraine launches 41 mw first stage of Novotroyitska wind farm"

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2 October, 2017

"Installed capacity of ‘green’ generation in Ukraine 18% up in nine months – NCER"

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"Ukrainian exports of computer and information services 18.3% up in h1, 2017 – EBA"

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30 September, 2017

"Apple co-founder Wozniak in Kyiv: "It's a special visit""

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"Ukraine cannot reach consensus on cryptocurrency – Central Bank explains why"

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29 September, 2017

"Intl companies ready to invest $500 mln in entertainment park in Kyiv"

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"Trade opening for Ukraine: Joint Statement by Commissioner Malmström and Deputy Minister Mykolska"

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28 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook The Reformers Heather Stephenson is Senior Writer and Editor for Fletcher Magazine which is published for Alumni and Friends of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. I am grateful to Ms. Stephenson for granting UGTI permission to share with our readers her article titled "The Reformers" originally published (with a fantastic illustration by Tang Yau Hoong) in the Summer 2017 issue of Tufts Magazine. This powerful piece highlights the ongoing struggle in Ukraine against the entrenched status quo which, in my view, presents no less formidable an obstacle to delivering on the promise of Maidan than Ukraine's ongoing war with Russia. "The Reformers" recounts the experience of committed reformers like Olena Tregub who until recently worked for the Government of Ukraine as the director within Ukraine's Ministry of Economic Development and Trade where she was responsible for overseeing a multibillion-dollar portfolio of international development projects. Ms. Tregub is no longer with the Ukrainian Ministry of Economics and Trade but after spending last week in New York as an attendee and speaker at the Concordia Summit (https://www.concordia.net/annualsummit/2017annualsummit/) she is back in Kyiv as the recently appointed Secretary General for the Independent Defense Anti-Corruption Committee established by Transparency International Defense & Security and Transparency International Ukraine to fight corruption in the Ukrainian defense sector. Please join me in thanking Olena Tregub and those dedicated Ukrainian reformers like her.   https://tuftsmagazine.com/issues/fletcher/reformers-0

"Kyivkhlib starts exporting products to U.S. in 2017"

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"Ukraine, Israel reach preliminary agreements on liberalization of industrial goods markets"

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27 September, 2017

"DuPont Pioneer launches sunflower seed production line in Poltava region"

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"Ukraine to Target Up to $1 Billion Via World Bank Lending"

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26 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Geothermal National & International Initiative Inc. My colleague Jack DiEnna is the Executive Director & Founder of the Geothermal National & International Initiative ("GEO-NII"). • http://www.geo-nii.org/ GEO-NII is an alliance of geothermal heat pump (GHP) industry professionals working to achieve the goals in the United States of the “Road to 30%” (market adoption for geothermal heating and cooling technologies) for the Ground Source Heat Pump (“GHP”) industry, both nationally & internationally, though federal, state, and local governmental officials, utilities providers, the design community, the HVAC industry, and end users in all market segments. GEO-NII's goal is to develop a sustainable infrastructure through professional development training. They support the adoption of IGSHPA standards & training certifications & accreditations, both nationally and internationally, for the design, installation and commissioning of GHP systems. These goals are even more important to achieve in Ukraine than in the United States because Ukraine’s acute need to quickly and cost-effectively enhance its energy security. This week I provide our readers a lesson in Geothermal Heat Pump Technology 101. In subsequent weeks, Mr. DiEnna will weigh in on specific applications of greatest interest to Ukraine so I encourage our readers to send me and Jack an email with questions or comments relating to Geo HVAC and energy security. We can be reached at: aleks.m@ukrainegti.com and jdienna@geo-nii.org. Geothermal Heat Pump Technology 101 Basic Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) Concept • GHP technology transfers heat between the steady temperature of the earth and a building no maintain the building space conditions. • Below the surface of the earth the temperature remains constant, in Virginia it is typically around 53 - 56 degrees Fahrenheit (approximately 11.6 – 13.3 Celsius). • This stable temperature provides a source for heat in the winter and a means to reject excess heat in the summer. • In a GHP system, a fluid (typically water) is circulated between the building and the ground loop piping buried in the ground. • In the summer the fluid picks up heat from the building and moves it to the ground. • In the winter the fluid picks up heat from the ground and moves it to the building. • Heat pumps in the building make this transfer of heat possible. • GHP systems exchange thermal energy between a building and the ground. • When the building needs heating, the system extracts energy from the ground and pumps it into the building where it is concentrated by the heat pump. • Conversely, when the building needs cooling, the heat from the building is concentrated by the heat pumps and the system removes heat from the building and pumps it into the ground. • This exchange of thermal energy makes the system efficient. Rather than creating heat by burning a fuel on site, the GHP system moves thermal energy between the ground and the building, using heat pump technology. • The relatively constant temperature of the ground makes this energy transfer efficient throughout the year, even during the coldest weather. • When the building needs cooling the system takes advantage of the relatively constant ground temperature that is often cooler than the outdoor air in the summer. • Alternative systems must move energy from the building to the hotter outdoor air, while the ghp system gains efficiency by transferring the energy to the cooler ground.   Benefits of GHP Include: • Low Operating Cost – The efficiency of the heat pumps operating under moderate loop temperatures provide the basis for high efficiency and low operating cost. The cost to move energy around the building is also low, as heat pumps are placed at each space. There is no need to circulate large amounts of air around the building to transport energy, nor is there a need to reheat air to maintain comfort in certain areas of a building. • Simplicity – The distributed nature of the system makes it easy to understand. A heat pump located at each space will provide independent heating and cooling. The operation of one heat pump does not affect any other heat pump. Control simply requires turning the unit on or off in response to the area that needs heating or cooling. • Low Maintenance – The heat pump itself is a packaged unit no more complex than typical residential air conditioning equipment. The components are the same as those used for outdoor applications that have much wider operating ranges and exposure to the weather. Diagnosing problems has become easier due to the distributed nature of the system. Any problem is typically closely related to the equipment serving the space. • No Supplemental Heat Required – Heat pumps can meet all of the space loads, including ventilation loads. Ventilation air can be tempered by separate heat pumps and/or conditioned with heat recovery equipment. • Low Cost Integrated Water Heating – Heat pumps can be dedicated to meet hot water loads. These heat pumps become particularly attractive when there is a large cooling load relative to the heating load. By extracting some of the heat from the ground loop for water heating, the ground heat exchanger size and cost can be reduced. • No Required Exposed Outdoor Equipment – The ground heat exchanger is buried and the heat pumps are located inside the building. Vandalism, noise, and visual screen problems are eliminated. Designers do not have to supply roof space for equipment, making options such as standing seam metal roofs or large sloped roofs possible. • Low Environmental Impact – No fossil fuels need to be consumed on site. Pollution can be best mitigated at a central power plant where electricity is produced. As the efficiency of electricity production or renewable power generation increases, so does the environmental efficiency of the heat pump system. • Level Seasonal Electric Demand – With winter heat pump operation displacing fossil fuel use and summer heat pump operation occurring at moderate, more efficient loop temperatures, the electric demand is more consistent throughout the year so the average price of electricity is reduced. • Longer Life Expectancy - Both the American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the Electric Power Research Institute have concluded, based on independent research studies, that the appropriate service life value for geothermal heat pump technology is 20 years or more. This benchmark is the current industry standard.

"Klitschko announces construction of ‘Kyiv Disneyland’"

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"Apartment sold for cryptocurrency for the first time in Ukraine"

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25 September, 2017

"Canada's TIU to invest EUR94 mln in building five solar plants in Ukraine"

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"UkrAVTO Corporation could enter tractor market with South Korean LS tractors"

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23 September, 2017

"IMF: Ukraine has proven itself capable of implementing reforms"

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"Justin Trudeau: Canada will always remain a friend of Ukraine"

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22 September, 2017

"Agriculture, Infrastructure, Energy sectors are most promising for investment in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine president says Trump shares vision on 'new level' of defense cooperation"

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21 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Dentons Global Public Procurement Insights Webinar: Ukraine As noted in my post yesterday introducing the UA Global Support program, catalyzing change demands leading by example. For UGTI, the commitment to lead by example in Ukraine applies with equal force to business ethics as it does to social responsibility. At UGTI, we strive to develop an efficient, stable and profitable business on a foundation of high standards of business conduct and respect for the law. Our good name and reputation are essential to success in achieving this objective. We are developing and will adopt a Code of Business Conduct to achieve stability and success in the market economy. To learn more about why I believe leading by example in adopting and following a clear Code of Business Conduct is critical to long-term success in Ukraine please join me on Thursday, September 28 at noon Eastern for a 75-minute webinar examining key issues and opportunities for contractors supporting US and allied operations in Ukraine, cybersecurity challenges and opportunities, and openings for the sale of other products and services. I am privileged to have as my co-panelists and moderator for this discussion: • JOHN E. HERBST - US Ambassador to Ukraine from 2003–2006 and current Director of the Atlantic Council's Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center; • MARKIAN SILECKY - Dentons partner and resident in our New York and Kyiv offices; focuses on business formations, corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, and compliance, in the US, Ukraine and elsewhere internationally; and • MARK MEAGHER (moderator) - Dentons partner in our Denver and Washington, DC, offices, with 30 years' experience in US federal contracting, including providing legal advice for clients performing overseas support operations. To register for the Thursday, September 28 discussion please visit: https://goo.gl/GXFAJ5

"Ukraine shows highest investment attractiveness for last six years - President"

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"World Bank: Ukraine needs to carry out land reform as soon as possible"

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20 September, 2017

"Ukraine could get at least $10 bln from sale of Naftogaz minor stake when its reform complete"

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"Investors from U.S., UK buy 82% of Ukraine's bonds"

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19 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook UA Global Support To be a catalyst for change we must lead by example and UGTI hopes that the UA Global Support program will encourage other companies active in Ukraine to help Ukrainians build a more just society. This week’s post will be short in length but we hope incredibly impactful in Ukraine for years to come. We hope that our friends and colleagues share the view at UGTI that work like that performed by the Co-Pilot Project (https://razomforukraine.org/cpp/) team to address the significant deficit in high quality neurosurgical and spine surgery training in Ukraine is of critical importance and deserving of support. Fostering the development of a corporate environment in Ukraine where companies take seriously their social obligations is among UGTI’s core objectives. Beginning in 2018 UGTI will lead by example in this arena by committing to donate 2% of net revenue to projects and initiatives in Ukraine that promote the social good through the “UA Global Support” program. Over the coming months UGTI will either form or partner with an existing 501(c)3 nonprofit entity to identify and evaluate the projects and initiatives in Ukraine to which UGTI will donate – on a quarterly basis – 2% of its net revenue. I am thrilled to use this week’s post to announce that the Co-Pilot Project will be the first UA Global Support project partner. As the first partner, the Co-Pilot Project will receive the first $20,000.00 of UA Global Support funding. In the future, the nonprofit team will be solely responsible for selecting the projects and initiatives to receive donations under UA Global Support program.

"LYBID project should be completed despite all difficulties – State Space Agency"

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"General Electric considering setting up production of locomotives and spare parts in Ukraine"

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18 September, 2017

"EU proposes five-year program to support energy efficiency fund"

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"Chinese market opened for exports of Ukrainian sunflower cake, beet pulp"

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16 September, 2017

"Poroshenko, Trump to meet on September 21"

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"Ukraine-India commission on agrarian cooperation to start operating this autumn"

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15 September, 2017

"Chinese market opened for exports of Ukrainian sunflower cake, beet pulp"

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"EBRD President: We believe in Ukraine as one of our largest markets"

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14 September, 2017
MARIYA SOROKA President, Marketing Director at Razom for Ukraine Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook THE CO-PILOT PROJECT: NEUROSURGERY TRAINING IN UKRAINE Aleks Mehrle, UGTI President The Co-Pilot Project (CPP) is a Razom for Ukraine (https://razomforukraine.org/) initiative conceived, launched and realized by my friends Dr. Luke Tomycz and Mariya Soroka. CPP aims to address the significant deficit in high quality neurosurgical and spine surgery training in Ukraine, a country of 45 million people in eastern Europe. Just as a co-pilot acts as another set of eyes and ears for the pilot, their mission is to send surgeons from North America to mentor and aid Ukrainian surgeons through difficult cases. Luke and Mariya recently returned from 3+ intensive and rewarding months in Ukraine and Mariya was kind enough to prepare a short summary of their work and next steps for our readers. For more information on the lifesaving work of the Co-Pilot Project team (and to make a donation) please visit: https://razomforukraine.org/cpp/ Like Mariya and Luke, the UGTI team is are supremely optimistic about the future of Ukraine and Ukrainian medicine. We hope you join me and the CPP team for its main fundraising event of 2017 in NYC this November. Okean Elzy frontman, Slava Vakarchuk will perform a private concert in NYC with special guest, jazz pianist Fima Chupakin. This event will be held November 4th at 8 PM at a private residence in Manhattan. Tickets cost $500 and funds will go to support 2018 Co-Pilot Project efforts.To secure your ticket email Mariya: mariya@razomforukraine.org Mariya Soroka, President of Razom for Ukraine Luke and I just came back to New York from our 2017 Ukrainian trip. We are very excited about all we have been able to accomplish with the help of a committed team of Ukrainian and American volunteers and partners. We are also very eager to share our thoughts about the future of the Co-Pilot Project, especially the recently formulated plan to launch an international fellowship program in Ukraine. First some updates: • Our team continues to grow and has recruited the professional support of the following individuals in Kyiv: photographer and film-maker, Ruslan Batytskyi; organizer and administrator, Anya Siryk. • We have welcomed our second official "co-pilot", Jefferson Miley, MD (neurointerventionalist from Dell Medical School in Austin, TX) who accompanied us in Lviv for a week of operating, giving lectures, and teaching local physicians. • By the end of August, we project to have performed over 40 major neurosurgical procedures including: aneurysm clipping, aneurysm coil embolization, complex skull base tumor resections, pediatric brain tumor resections, spinal surgery, Chiari decompression surgery, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, lesionectomy and hemispherotomy for epilepsy, and vagal nerve stimulation...on infants and adults. • We have now assisted with surgical procedures and developed working relationships with Ukrainian surgeons at multiple sites all around Ukraine: International Neurosurgery Center (Kyiv), Romadanov Institute of Neurosurgery (Kyiv), Children's Regional Medical Center (Lviv), Adult Trauma Hospital (Lviv), Children's Regional Medical Center (Lutsk), Children's Regional Medical Center (Odesa). • Nearly $12,000 has been spent to date to help pay for implants and the costs of highly complex brain surgeries to help provide these life-saving operations for patients who otherwise cannot afford them. • Igor Kurilets MD, one of our Ukrainian neurosurgical partners, will attend the European Association of Neurosurgery course in Brno, Czech Republic, one of the first of many training courses we hope to fund. • We have identified partners interested in building a neurosurgical center of excellence with a training program that will secure the sustainability of the Co-Pilot Project and ensure that high-quality neurosurgeons train young surgeons in Ukraine in the immediate future and for generations to come. Short version: We continue to form strong relationships with surgeons throughout Ukraine who we feel confident will be deciding the future of Ukrainian neurosurgery. These young men and women are driven and committed, speak English, and cease at every opportunity to learn modern techniques. Over the last three months, as we approach the completion of 40 major brain and spine operations with close to 10 different partners, we became ever more convinced for the need to develop a fellowship program in Ukraine to supplement the woefully inadequate training that most young neurosurgeons receive. We hope with time, we could apply for accreditation with the World Federation of Neurosurgery - and we feel confident that we see a way forward to achieving that goal. Looking forward to see you on November 4th, Mariya and Luke

"Ukraine should take advantage of world economic growth"

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"EU signs document on granting additional trade preferences to Ukraine"

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13 September, 2017

"Average salary in Ukraine grows by 21%"

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"Iran, Ukraine review developing economic ties"

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12 September, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine - education is a first step to a breakthrough I arrived in Ukraine two weeks ago. Unlike dozens of previous trips to Ukraine this one is very special. On all previous trips our main goal was to establish network and build infrastructure to support UGTI vision on economic development of Ukraine. But now I arrived with single goal to lunch UGTI operations in Ukraine. UGTI Inc is a “window in and out of Ukraine”. We are the mechanism that allows capital, technology and innovation to flow freely into Ukraine and out of Ukraine to the benefit of all. The atmosphere here (at least for me) is electrifying! My intuition tells me that there is a major breakthrough for all Ukrainians and its already underway. I am and my partner Aleks are honored to be able to play a role. Statement above in NO WAY discounting all of the obstacles still in place in Ukraine. There will be a great deal of hard work ahead. Ukrainians are ready for growth and will demand this during upcoming political season. But Ukraine is 1st again – country that is most attractive for investors. See below https://en.censor.net.ua/news/454272/ukraine_tops_the_list_of_most_attractive_investment_countries_for_fund_man agers_institutional_investor In order to facilitate and expedite this transformation EDUCATION is a must. So, as a first step of our implementation plan, we are lunching Master Class this October (will be hosted in all 22 regions within 6 months) in partnership with SFII and Sikorsky Challenge. Below is a description of 1 day, 8 hour interactive Master Class, with real life examples that will benefit individual looking to start a business and a season professional. I hope to see many of in the audience. Master Class Description Long time ago Charles Darwin said: “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” This is an absolute true in the world of entrepreneurs today and it will become even truer in the future. One-day Master Class is created for an audiences who is fully committed to succeed in business. The Master Class is designed to provide overview and introduction to most critical elements of the business irrespective of its current development stage. 1) Start-Up and Innovation – individuals who are contemplating becoming entrepreneur and the ones who already made a GIGANTIC step to transform their Idea to Reality. Apprenticeships are a phenomenal opportunity to achieve this. It is an ultimate model for work-based learning and a fantastic gateway to opportunities in the business world. Working with local industries, global organizations and entrepreneurs, students develop a rounded skill set that means they can hit the ground running when they enter the real world – whether that's as entrepreneurs in their own right or whether they choose to start their career in an existing business. Apprentices can extract the most value from an apprenticeship by being exposed to several businesses and sectors during their apprenticeship term. 2) Taking Business to next Level – building business model to scale Over 300 years ago Galileo said: “You can not teach man anything; you can only help him to find it within himself”.Over 90% of small and medium size businesses underutilize their potential. For majority, the reasons are:of clearly defined long-term strategy, business model that has no chance to scale and operations that depend not on systems but on specific individuals. In this course, students will be given a roadmap of how to transform their business into fast growing and high margin enterprise.“We can not be content with status quo. Any business today that embraces the status quo as an operating principle is going to be on the death march” Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks. 3) Sales, Customer Service & Marketing Everything in life is Sales. People just do not see it this way. John D. Rockefeller said that “The ability to deal with people is as purchasable commodity as sugar or coffee. And I will pay more for this ability, then any other under the sun”. Define key success drivers; develop your people and drive business outcomes. Sounds very simple but there is science behind it. Regardless of how brilliant product is or how critical your service is, without sales there is no business. In this course students will learn in-depth Discovering Markets to Sell into, Executive Sales Skills, Professional Sales Management, Successful Negotiations, Client Development, Selling Process, Presenting Solutions to buying team, Recruiting Sales People, Building Sales Team and creating Customer Focused culture throughout organization. 4) Executive Leadership for 21st Century According to John Wooden, a legendary basketball coach: “body, mind and emotions of the leader - all must be balanced in order to build and lead a successful organization”. We will develop skills in areas such as communication, data-driven decision-making, developing and supporting talent, leadership, strategic management, project management, and supporting and fostering stewardship of an organization’s culture and brand. You’ll learn through a combination of theoretical course work and practical applications.

"YES Forum will be held in Mystetsky Arsenal in Kyiv"

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"Ukraine, Canada start creating contract and legal base for developing cooperation in aerospace area"

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11 September, 2017

"Ukraine’s exports to Iran grew by almost 80%"

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"Turkish govt cuts import duties on Ukrainian agricultural goods"

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9 September, 2017

"Westinghouse, Polenergia, EDF want to participate in Ukraine-EU Energy Bridge project"

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"Port industry in Ukraine is most promising in terms of concession contracts - EBRD"

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8 September, 2017

"U.S. Greenbrier wants to order about 10,000 wagons in Ukraine with maximum localization of production"

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"Holtec International intends to produce small modular reactors in Ukraine"

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7 September, 2017
PAVEL HRANOVSKIY PR support, development of marketing strategies, design of materials for outdoor media Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook SFII Press release Kyiv, Ukraine, the lobby of Hyatt Regency Hotel. Large numbers of people at the entrance to the conference hall make it clear that there is a big business event. The attendance of security guard near the windows hints that Ukraine’s political elites are present at this event. In a matter of hours, on the runway of the panel discussion of Forum will come out the person, who in his own words and messages will make some young people who are wearing the brand suit to turn on the recorder and make notes. This man is Volodymyr Stavniuk, the chairman of the board of the State Finance Institution for Innovations. This Institution is unique by the nature of its activity. And this is not just a matter of words. You may judge. The Institution is the only one of the hundreds of the public organizations that can attract foreign investment for the implementation of the innovative project. Without bureaucratic acrimony, without various kinds of checks and restrictions, the top management just says – if you want to invest in Ukraine with the guarantee of success - come to us. The atmosphere of understanding and trust that comes from the speech of the chairman of the board reinforces the general provisions of the Institution that spelled out in its Charter. “Our door is open for investors from all over the world. We believe that the ideas of our compatriots and government’s earnest desire to carry out the reforms are multiplied by the desire of foreign investor to secure profits in a short space of time will become the synergistic impetus and historical choice for Ukraine and many generations of Ukrainian,” said Volodymyr Stavniuk. The investors from China and Korea were the first who supported this formula. Ukraine was and remains the territory which despite the political problems has several advantages, including the progressive developments of scientists and resource base. The lack of the strict regulation in the sphere of ІТ, infrastructure and agribusiness play the important role. A number of agreements have been concluded with such giants as CNTIK, AVIC, CPCG and this confirms the success of this formula. “We are ready to start the work as soon as possible because we believe in the Ukrainian projects and prospects which are opened before us. The another argument for our confidence is the vision of seriousness of intentions towards the foreign investors from Ukraine,” stated Zhang Hao, Green Bond Investment. Let’s go back to realities. Ukraine, despite the declarative intentions, may be virtually the first European “tiger” but remains the country with the post-Soviet syndrome. To feel this is quite simple – go to any regional or district center, and find the Regional State Administration and ask to meet with the head of the region. Obviously, you won’t take that answer. Anyone who tried to do business in the Ukrainian regions knows that the lack of professionalism, unpunctuality, the incompetence of certain officials kill any desire to invest in the most promising Ukrainian projects. What does SFII do? As the State Institution, it can appeal directly to the local authority and also can have the impact on their decisions. Being a mediator and guarantor between the foreign investors and business owner, the specialists of this Institution on simplification and purification processes of investment act as lobbyists for investors. The project developer for the wireless power transmission Mykhailo is surfing e-mail when the clock on the laptop reflects 3:00 a.m. The energy to find the investor for his project adds him the belief that the project can become revolutionary and can turn the whole market, which operates today through electric power. You can fasten your eyes on the slogan of the organization’s website which sounds like “Engine of the Ukrainian economy.” Mykhailo intuitively understands that such Institution can be the real opportunity to find the foreign investment for his ideas. Why not? The foreign investors should be interested in Ukraine as the market where is profitable to invest – cheap resources, low-cost labor, educated people. On the other hand the state needs theses fund; finally, who else, other that the foreign business may provide the investment infusion in the economy. The puzzle came together, it makes perfect sense. Andriy Dubas, the head of the Project Finance Department says: “The creation of the project submission portal from the Ukrainian developers wasn’t the goal in itself for our institution. It’s probably the imperative of our time. The leading investment banks want to have the full information about the domestic business and what does it can offer. All the know-how, systems of renewable energy, large infrastructure objects all these projects are sent to investors from around the world. Time is the resource and the bankers set the high value on time, and we understand this.” The State Finance Institution for Innovations is the mediator in the finest sense of this word which combines investor and project owner. Have you ever seen how does Sting’s concert organizer work? By setting the goal to make a show he makes the monumental efforts that performers and audience being fully satisfied. He doesn’t have room for error or imbalance in the relationship because the confidence of both parties to him creates the dual responsibility.To say that this institution is Sting’s concert organizer in the world of investments will be not entirely correct. It can not only act as the syndicator of business development in Ukraine but also act as the necessary partner. The possibility to act as a co-investor with the share of 10% of the total amount of investments is the good sign from Ukraine as the State isn’t it?

"Government approves use of ProZorro.Sales for state assets sale"

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"EU share of Ukraine’s foreign trade reaches 40% "

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6 September, 2017

"Ukraine tops the list of most attractive investment countries for fund managers, - Institutional Investor"

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"HackIT 2017 forum winners to be in Ukroboronprom’s Cyber Guard creating national Cyber Security Center"

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5 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Join us for Dentons Global Public Procurement Insights Webinar: Ukraine On September 28, 2017 at noon Eastern I am thrilled to join Members of Dentons' global Public Procurement team to discuss Ukraine's business climate, and opportunities and challenges for US and other foreign companies doing business or interested in doing business there. Also on the agenda will be how to effectively navigate the country's political and security landscape. To join us please RSVP at the following link: https://insights.dentons.com/236/2961/landing-pages/rsvp-blank.asp?sid=2449f116-c943-429a-a8a0-9adbc5ed162c --- Thursday, September 28, 2017 12 p.m. ET Webinar

"Legalization of cryptocurrencies would be a ‘quantum leap’ for Ukraine, expert believes"

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"Ukroboronprom presents new light aircraft"

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4 September, 2017

"U.S. provide largest financing of donor projects in Ukraine in H1 2017"

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"Investment Forum to be held in Kyiv in late September"

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2 September, 2017

"Ukraine likely to get IMF tranche following next EFF revision - Morgan Stanley"

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"Ukroboronprom presents new Ukrainian weapons"

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1 September, 2017

"Ukraine-EU Association Agreement enters fully into force"

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"IMF mission to arrive in Ukraine on September 12"

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31 August, 2017
PAVEL KRAVCHENKO Founder of Distributed Lab Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Know Your Tokens: Not All Crypto Assets Are Created Equal What we understand by the term "token" is actually best defined as the balance of some kind of account. But, perhaps most importantly, it's a balance that can really mean anything its founder wants it to mean. To date, tokens have been made to represent a user's reputation within a system (augur), a deposit in US dollars (tether), the quantity of files that are saved in it (filecoin) and the balance in some internal currency system (bitcoin). Because of this, I sometimes argue that tokens don't even exist – mostly, because I want to draw attention to the fact that they always have a very specific meaning. If we want an analogy, tokens can turn everything that we're used to seeing in paper form – including shares, and money and promissory notes – digital. But the terms we will use for these things will remain unchanged (shares will still be shares). The fact that crypto assets are stored in a decentralized accounting system, or require digital signatures, doesn't change their meaning or value. As such, the problem that is emerging isn't with the actual terms themselves, but that people have begun to assign attributes to tokens that they can't possibly have. There are people who claim that cryptocurrency tokens are something entirely new – and that projects that issue tokens can become amazingly transformed. Sadly, that's not the reality. Tokens and tokens In computer terminology, the term "token" has long meant one of two things: a gadget that can authorize a user (such as a dongle or a special thumb drive), or a fixed array of symbols that identify a user (such as an API key). In both situations, tokens can pass between different owners. So, how are cryptocurrencies different from the tokens we know? Generally, the term "crypto asset" means one of three different things: • A cryptocurrency with decentralized issuance and transactions. • A digital asset, issued into a decentralized system, and secured by either someone or something. This version can be split into two further subdivisions: either the accounting system isn't trusted; or the issuer isn't trusted. • Something that's both issued and validated by the same organization, yet not backed-up by anything. PayPal manages digital balances and transaction processing independently and non-transparently. This implies that its users must have implicit trust in PayPal, in order to be able to use its systems. Bitcoin handles processing and transaction processing entirely transparently, and in a completely decentralized way – because people would not trust an anonymous system under any other circumstances whatsoever. Tether handles processing entirely transparently (even better than the bitcoin network), but users must trust that it is faithfully issued (each token is 100% backed up by cash money on a bank account). Any centralized land registry demands that its users trust it in aspects of correctness of accounting – yet there are no issues on the question of issue (since new land can't be produced from thin air, and all land already exists). Types of tokens So what kinds of token are there? And how do they differ? A token can fulfil either one, or several of the following functions: • A currency, used as a payment system between participants. • A digital asset (a digital right – to land ownership, or tomatoes in a warehouse, and similar assets). • A means for accounting (number of API-calls, volume of torrent uploads). • A share (stake) in a specific start-up. • A way of rewarding main players (the best example is bitcoin). • A way of preventing attacks (such as commission within the bitcoin network). • Payment for using a system. Yet because there are so many options it may be hard to classify any particular token; they are often a cross between shares, an internal currency and accounting units. Tokens that are directly linked to shares in a company, for instance, don't need further consideration; they are completely identical to shares. More complex are so-called "utility tokens." Let's remember, this kind of token is used as way of making internal payments – yet their price can rise due to limitations in their issue, and due to rising demand. It's precisely due to this dual functionality that it's hard to define exactly what they are. Sometimes they behave on markets as though they are shares, yet regulators treat them as accounting units. Alongside this, people can sometimes use these to make payments to each other. The best definition for "utility tokens" is the one put forward by Vladimir Dubinin (my business partner). He compared the pre-sale of tokens with the sale of government bonds in US dollars. These bonds are denominated in the national currency, and profits from them will be paid out in that currency too. These bonds, it seems, will be sold at a heavy discount, but if they go well, the currency rate might rise quickly. In this light, we shouldn't forget that no nation whatsoever is keen to see its currency becoming too pricey because this leads to a sluggish economy and has a negative effect on the balance of payments. Questions for investors I'd say the main questions for investors are these: What does this token represent? Is it a share, an internal currency or an accounting unit? What would cause the value of this token to rise? Is it limited issue, or do you need to hold tokens to complete each transactions when using a product? What's the potential for growth? Does this product have potential to be needed by everyone on earth? Will the product remain in demand, say, if the token costs $1,000? In other words, couldn't the product's popularity become its own Achilles' heel? For example, if a transaction costs 1 token, at a price of $1,000, then would that be a reasonable and affordable price for users? Could that same product continue to exist without the tokens for it? Bitcoin, for example, couldn't function without the bitcoin token, yet Ripple could easily do so. In short, it's worth doing an analysis of this kind when looking at tokens as part of a long-term investment portfolio, rather than when buying with a view to speculating. My own personal feeling is that the market for crypto-assets remains rather overheated. It could be better to hold off the moment for getting into this market. Source: https://www.coindesk.com/what-is-token-really-not-all-crypto-assets-created-equal/

"Ukraine hopes to revive investment cooperation with U.S. - Groysman"

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"OPIC to support building wind power plants in Zaporizhia Region for $400 MLN"

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30 August, 2017

"Pivdenmash preparing new batch of engines for European Vega LV to ship them to partners"

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"Famous architect Romero from Romero-Slim family shows interest in Ukraine’s investment potential"

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29 August, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine is 1st but the best is ahead for the country Ukraine just celebrated it 26th birthday and on the same day I read a news story that placed Ukraine 1st in the world in the period between 1991 and 2017 – UKRAINE LOST 35% of its real GDP. Only 3 other countries had negative GDP growth during this period of time. Of course it nothing to be proud of. Victims of such terrible results are people of Ukraine. But we have a choice to make as individuals and organizations. We can choose to accept the last 26 years as what we should expect for the next quarter of a century or we can choose to look at the glass half full rather than half empty. In my humble opinion, I see a lot of things happening on the ground that I did not see in the previous 25 years. It makes me VERY optimistic about the future of my native country. First, Ukraine reached the bottom economically. We know all the ugly facts but we also start seeing early signs of turnaround in general economic numbers. Any professional trader will tell you that the best time to buy is during the reversal of a downtrend into uptrend. Ukraine is turning this corner. It is time to put a buy rating on Ukraine. Second, enormous attention United States is paying to Ukraine (for wide range of reasons) will turn in to dollars invested into the country, US corporations will be setting up manufacturing in Ukraine to capture lower cost, high quality of human resource and favorable geographic location. Cooperation in areas of cybersecurity and energy will make economic relationship between the countries much more fruitful financially than in the past. Third, China also will play a major role in the economic growth of Ukraine. It needs Ukraine not only as a new market to sell its goods into but as a manufacturing base to sell into EU and to capture innovation coming out from brains of Ukrainian engineers and scientists. In upcoming trade war with United States, Ukraine will become more important for China in years to come. Fourth, I started to see a real change in behavior of government officials. New generation is entering the halls of power. The generation that wants to see the country succeed. The generation that is tired rules of the old guard. No questions that there is a long way to go. There is still too much of: “this how we always done it”; too much of bureaucracy and unnecessary paperwork; lack of proper compensation for government employees; not enough education of proper way of governance and lack of quality leadership. But I think we are observing beginning of a major government transformation trend. I hope that in 5 years from now all Ukrainian will be proud of the job elected officials are doing. Fifth, in my opinion is most important trend. Ukraine within next 5-10 years can erase all of the losses of 26 years by getting TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION right. Our team identified scientific fields of 21st century that will allow Ukraine to transform its economy. Blockchain, nano or space technologies (and many others) give Ukraine a real chance at leadership in the world. Our team is prepared to lead this transformation www.ukraineil.com. We are building ecosystems to support Innovation, Start up and SME. In conclusion, if you add all natural resources country has to it intellectual potential and capacity, we can see country grow its GDP by 10% annually for foreseeable future. So, despite Ukraine 1st place in the race in which no one wants to be first, I am VERY optimistic about country’s future. I hope you will join our team in making Ukraine’s potential a reality!

"GOVT to foresee UAH 1 bln to support farmers in draft state budget for 2018 – Groysman"

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"Hong Kong interested in Ukrainian chocolate"

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28 August, 2017

"Moody’s upgrades Ukraine’s credit rating to CAA2 with ‘POSITIVE’ outlook"

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"Ukraine needs to raise competitiveness in domestic and foreign markets, develop start-ups – U.S. Ambassador"

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26 August, 2017

"EU to give Ukraine EUR 100 million for energy efficiency"

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"ProZorro system already saved about UAH 30 bln of budget funds – Kubiv"

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25 August, 2017

"Ukraine to lodge lawsuit with WTO against Russia over agricultural products by end of 2017"

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"Moody's upgrades Ukraine's credit rating to Caa2 with 'positive' outlook"

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24 August, 2017
IVAN CHAIKA Business Start-up Consultant, Summer 2017 Extern for the U.S.-Ukraine Foundation Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukrainian Drones: In Business and at War Introduction The United States provides one of the best environments for effectively commercializing new technologies. This is due to the Triple Helix Model of university-industry-government relationships , access to investment resources for business development, and appropriate industry regulation. In the context of Ukraine and as it relates to drone technology, the percentage of Ukrainian businesses that use drone technology in their manufacturing is below 10% . This was because of a disconnect between university research and commercial needs. This has resulted in weak property protection rights for investors and ineffective state governance. For a long time, Ukraine has generally produced and exported low added value products such as agriculture, chemicals, and metals. The prioritization of these industries meant slow development in the technology industry. As a result, intellectual property law, business protections, venture capital, and technology transfer was not a priority and, therefore, not enforced. However, in the past three years, this situation has dramatically changed. Two major events--the Revolution of Dignity and Russian invasion into Ukraine--have accelerated reforms in the police force, the energy sector, the healthcare system, the judicial system, and against corruption in politics. Within two years, Ukraine succeeded in becoming energy-independent from Russia by diversifying its suppliers. This kind of progress contributed to the launch of startups like Ecoisme , a tech company that monitors and optimizes energy use for private homeowners. Recently, this successful company signed a contract with the government of United Arab Emirates to work on its national energy efficiency program. Despite the only partial success of the above-mentioned reforms, Ukraine pushes forward with economic development. According to the European Business Association, Ukraine now boasts a higher investment attractiveness level than it has in six years. I. Drones in Practice Ukraine has a history of developing drone technology, but the importance of this industry was highlighted only 3 years ago. In the first months of the Russian-Ukrainian war, the Russian army showed how effectively military drones can be used on the frontlines. The Ukrainian army was not equipped with drones, hence volunteers created drone units wherein civil operators adjusted artillery launches and made intelligence flights. Successes here produced a broader awareness in the country about drones and drone technology. As a result, several public spheres decided to use drones in their work. a) Military Industry The Ukrainian defense industry can use drones to increase security for soldiers and to test tactical scenarios. However, because of high prices and importation complications, the Ministry of Defense, namely the Ukrainian state-owned concern Ukroboronprom, moved to increase national drone production. That began the process of corporatization . In 2015, Antonov company , started working with Polish WB Electronics on producing unmanned aircraft complexes, including those for combat. At the same time, private drone producers started pushing for state orders. Still, Ukraine is not able to provide hundreds of needed drones to its military units. Therefore, the US Department of Defense provided 72 drones to the Ukrainian military under the European Reassurance Initiative (ERI) program. For years, Ukraine has been a top-10 world exporter of weapons by selling its Soviet-era arsenal and new domestic weapons developments. Today, profits from these activities are funneled increasingly into the Ukrainian armed forces. However, after satisfying the frontline demand, Ukraine has an opportunity to open a new chapter in drone trade through the export of drones. Israel is a prime example of a nation successfully developing into an advanced technological power during wartime. Israel started with military drones and then became a world leader in producing civil drones. b) Agriculture As a strong player in the agriculture sector and possessing about one third of the world's fertile black soil , Ukraine can increase agricultural potential by using drones in their companies' business processes. In 2016, one of the most successful drone companies, Drone.Ua , used more than 1000 drones to provide a broad range of services to its clients in agriculture: measuring and monitoring fields, quality control of soil cultivation and sowing, analyzing seedling losses, and much more. Drone.Ua surveys 10% of Ukrainian fields (about 3 million square meters). Recently, the company launched in the EU market and received $4.7 million in investment for future business development. Also, Kray , another Ukrainian drone company specializing in agricultural aviation, signed contracts with farms in the United States and Canada. c) Other Interesting Fields Drones can be especially useful in logistics. In 2015, a successful Ukrainian logistics company, Nova Poshta , began testing on drone mail delivery. In Switzerland , drones were used to deliver packages as part of a pilot project by Swiss Post. Amazon made its first successful deliveries via drone in December, 2016. Ultimately, drones can be used in many areas: for mapping, protecting natural resources, personal entertainment, municipal services, media, and security. II. Current Regulation of Drones in Ukraine Drone use, or "unmanned aerial vehicles " (UAVs) as they are officially designated in current legislation , is not specifically regulated. They are within a broad group of civil and commercial aircraft, according to airspace regulation. No official regulatory documents exist regarding UAV flight, certification, attestation of operators, or integration into air traffic management. " Unmanned aerial vehicle " is defined as any aircraft intended to fly without a pilot on board. These vehicles are controlled by a special control station not located onboard the vehicle. Drones weighing less than 20 kilograms do not require registration or flight clearance from state agencies. Moreover, there is no restriction on using drones in cities for private purposes, except in restricted areas. Such regulation is outdated and doesn't meet the current needs of the drone industry. Therefore, the Ukrainian government recently started adopting new drone legislation. III. Recent Legislative Improvements The State Aviation Administration of Ukraine prepared general guidelines and provided recommendations on the use of drones In August 2016. These regulations are similar to the European Aviation Safety Agency 's and United Kingdom 's guidelines. The provisions determine the rights and limitations for drone operators. For example, drone operators are encouraged to respect privacy by keeping a distance of 50 meters away from people and property, avoid flights of over 100 meters, be aware of security provisions, complete pre-flight inspection of UAVs, keep UAVs within visual range at all times, and refrain from flying in bad weather conditions. Additionally, drones are not allowed within 5 kilometers of airports, restricted areas, or dangerous areas; to fly above vehicles, city streets, or crowds; or to be affixed with any additional items that are not part of the original design. However, these rules are only recommendations and, therefore, not enforceable. Taking into account current international practices, these conditions will likely be used as the basis for the new legislation being drafted at this moment. The State Aviation Administration of Ukraine published the draft of conceptual provisions and procedures for the safe use of UAVs in May 2016. The process for regulation implementation was affected by two significant factors. First, Ukraine did not have to contend with an overwhelming amount of uncontrolled drones, like in the U.S., therefore, progress in establishing modern regulations for drones was not considered urgent. At the same time, military conflict in the east and the needs of the agriculture industry placed pressure on legislators to come up with good regulations for the use of drones. Unclear regulation postpones industry development and could pose danger to the community. Last month, Ukrainian Avia Service presented a drone regulation draft for public discussion. The agency proposed four drone classifications: - 0-th class - up to 250 g (no registration, but the pilot must comply with the rules of use) - 1st class - from 250 grams to 20 kg (for non-commercial use - online registration, for commercial - the pilot must be trained and receive a certificate) - 2nd class - from 20 kg to 150 kg (all pilots must pass the training and receive a certificate) - 3rd class - over 150 kg (in accordance to the regulation of aircraft vessels) These kinds of classifications are quite common around the world today, including in the U.S. Generally speaking, we welcome the regulation of drones in Ukraine. Future regulations will provide clear rules in a market that will allow businesses to plan successful strategies. Due to the unique demands of the war and the development of agriculture, the drone industry can play an important role in domestic development and continue to increase sales in the global market. Ivan Chaika is a Business Start-up Consultant and a Summer 2017 Extern for the U.S.-Ukraine Foundation. Mr. Chaika received a LL.M. in Intellectual Property Law from the University of New Hampshire School of Law this past May. He has previously worked for a leading regional law company, as a legislative assistant at the Parliament of Ukraine, and as a research assistant at the Research Institute of Legal Provision of Innovation Development. He also serves as the "Ukraine Ambassador" in the U.S. for the Professional Government Association of Ukraine. Mr. Chaika can be reached at email: mr.ivan.chaika@gmail.com. Edited by Olivia Brinich, a Summer 2017 Intern at the U.S.-Ukraine Foundation. Ms. Brinich is attending Washington University in St. Louis and majoring in International Affairs. Source: http://myemail.constantcontact.com/SPECIAL-SUMMER-ISSUE.html?soid=1100917358001&aid=RbiC3-DBNT0

"Ukrainian exports to Canada 76% up in Jan-June 2017 - Mykolska"

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"Armed Forces got UAH 22 bln more this year - Groysman"

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23 August, 2017

"Ukrainian companies to participate in international Asia Fruit Logistica 2017"

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"Scania Ukraine sells another 15 vehicles to Nibulon"

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22 August, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Letter from UGTI founder Today is an important day for UGTI because after nearly 30 years in the United States my UGTI co-founder, partner and friend Henry Shterenberg is moving to Kyiv, Ukraine, the city of birth, to advance our shared vision. Henry, thank you for your vision, tenacity, talent, boundless energy and belief in Ukraine and its people. To mark your journey, I thought it would be appropriate to share with you, our readers and our colleagues text of the first UGTI Executive Summary we wrote together one year ago. Reading the unedited excerpt copied below was satisfying beyond description. Our progress and daily work together proves, beyond doubt, that although we set the bar high, it is within reach. Thank you for being my friend. Thank you for being my partner. Доброго Вітру! Ukraine Global Trade & Investor, Inc. (“UGTI”) was founded to become a transparent, efficient and powerful driver of sustainable economic growth and development in Ukraine by aligning the economic interests of Ukrainian businesses with those of Western counterparts through trade and investment. Ukraine is awash in undervalued opportunities for trade, partnership and investment across industries at the heart of the global economy including agriculture, aerospace, defense, heavy industry, manufacturing and IT. These established industries in Ukraine have room to grow thanks to a young and educated population, the lowest labor costs in Europe and conditions favorable to trade. Realizing this growth is challenging because despite 25 years of effort the Ukrainian economy is poorly integrated with the West and mistrust characterizes the relationship between the majority of Ukrainian and Western businesses more than understanding. The impact of this inability to integrate and failure to communicate began to be felt most acutely after former President Yanukovych, citing pressure from Russia, refused to sign Ukraine’s EU Association Agreement. Rather than accept a turn away from the West, Ukrainians rejected dominion from Moscow. A trade war with Russia, Ukraine’s largest trading partner, was among the economic consequences of this decision. Exports to Russia shrank by 36.2% in the first half of 2016, a decrease amplified by the fact that Ukrainian businesses have struggled to offset losses with sales to new customers in the West. As for imports, there is significant unmet demand in key industries where Ukraine seeks to reduce or eliminate reliance on Russian-supplied goods. UGTI will stimulate trade and investment with Ukraine by stepping in to the void between Ukrainian and Western companies to identify, evaluate, de-risk and facilitate deals across key sectors of Ukraine’s economy. This ambitious goal is within reach because for the first time in the quarter century since Ukraine’s independence substantially all levels of Ukrainian society, business and government are oriented west and motivated by self-interest to integrate. For many Ukrainian businesses integrating means learning to sell to customers who are poorly understood and live in countries where prior experience with Ukrainian businesses likely left a negative impression. This pivot would be difficult under any circumstances. Businesses in Ukraine are attempting it on the heels of a threefold devaluation in currency and while coping with lost Russian trade. If Western companies moved to fill the void left in Ukraine’s import or export markets they would find Ukrainian counterparties that are more (1) accommodating in negotiations, and (2) likely to honor contractual commitments than at any time in living memory. Unfortunately, these and other reasons to do business with Ukrainian companies today are overshadowed by the reputation for corruption they earned in the past. Lack of international interest or hesitation in respect to Ukraine is not irrational. Western companies and investors with no prior experience working in Ukraine or with Ukrainian companies assessed the opportunity and either decided against it or never considered it. All other things being equal, a company that decided against doing business with Ukraine in the past is unlikely to reconsider based solely on the perception of increased risk fostered by Russia’s annexation of Crimea and invasion and occupation of the Donbas. Western companies and investors active in Ukraine for any substantial period of time during the last 25 years understand it has great economic potential. The allure of that potential made tolerable the risk, uncertainty and often losses that came with doing business in Ukraine. These companies know the country and its business leaders well enough to appreciate that Ukraine today offers unique opportunity and real value. Unfortunately for Ukraine, they may also stand more to gain by waiting. Ukraine’s unmet demand for new trade and investment partners created an opportunity for UGTI to develop a simple business model based on bridging the divide between Ukrainian and Western companies. In 2014 UGTI founders began meeting with Ukrainian business leaders to better understand the obstacles faced by their companies. As a result of these meetings, UGTI came to understand that a small core of determined and experienced professionals with support from subject matter experts in different industries could secure the right to represent, whether in sales or investment, nearly any company in Ukraine. Today, UGTI has a team of 100 professionals who are leaders in their fields and represents 60 Ukrainian companies across 12 industries. UGTI was successful in securing the right to represent leading companies in key Ukrainian industries because it had the experience to recognize an opportunity early and invested the time and resources to develop a platform that mitigates risks of doing business in Ukraine or with Ukrainian companies (“UGTI Platform”)…Each transaction concluded through the UGTI Platform will attract more business and establish UGTI as a transparent, efficient and powerful driver of sustainable economic growth and development in Ukraine. As a US company driving trade and investment in Ukraine, UGTI will peacefully promote stability in the region.

"Ukraine, Israel plan to agree all issues on FTA in coming months"

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"Ukrainian startup DMarket selling in-virtual game items raises some $11.5 mln at first ICO phase"

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21 August, 2017

"GOVT approves bill introducing European standards for construction materials in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine interested in deepening cooperation with Sudan"

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19 August, 2017

"Poroshenko to meet with U.S. Secretary of Defense on Independence Day"

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"Germany provides additional humanitarian aid to Ukraine in amount of EUR 1 million"

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18 August, 2017

"UDP to build 300 MW power plants on renewable sources in next five years"

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"Ukraine central bank warns of new cyber-attack risk"

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17 August, 2017
TETYANA TYSHCHUK iMoRe project manager and editor UGTI on Facebook Train “Ukraine – Future”: In Which Direction Did the Country Move in the Second Quarter of 2017? In the second quarter of 2017, the reforms continued to slow down, while the average Index for Monitoring of Reforms (iMoRe) was the lowest for the entire monitoring period since early 2015 (+0.6 points). The greatest progress was observed in the areas of “deregulation,” “fighting corruption,” and “efficiency of public expenditures.” Among the important regulatory acts of this quarter are the laws on the electricity market, compulsory redemption and sale of shares, and the autonomization of healthcare establishments. More than two and a half years ago, the coalition of deputy factions “European Ukraine” made an agreement, having committed itself to reforming the country. In a month and a half, the President formally set the priorities of the reforms in the Ukraine 2020 strategy. The directions of reforms are also defined in the documents signed with the international partners – the IMF (1, 2, 3, 4), the EU (1, 2, 3), and the World Bank (1, 2). How are the reforms progressing and which aspects have shown improvements recently? VoxUkraine starts to publishing quarterly reviews of the reforms. This publication focuses on the key legislative changes made by the government in the second quarter of 2017. The rate of reformist legislative changes has been slowing down recently (graph 1). In the second quarter of 2017, the average Іndex for Monitoring of Reforms (iMoRe) was the lowest for the entire monitoring period since early 2015 (+0.6 points). The greatest progress in the second quarter of 2017 was observed in the area of “deregulation”: the total iMoRe index in this area is twice higher than in the spheres ranking second and third – “fighting corruption” and “efficiency of public expenditures” respectively Major reformist regulatory acts in the second quarter of 2017 1. Law on the electricity market (2019-VIII). The document determines a new market model. It should create opportunities for the development of competition and, as a result, for the free choice of electricity suppliers by final consumers. “Adoption of this law has marked the end of the first wave of implementation of the Third Energy Package of the EU at the level of basic laws,” says Roman Nitsovych, Dixi Group. “From a technical point of view, this law is of high quality, because experts from the EU structures and the Secretariat of the Energy Community have taken part in its development. The fundamental philosophy of the law is to launch liberalization of wholesale and retail electricity markets, which should result in the transition to market pricing rules, the protection of consumer rights, and the creation of conditions for the competition in the sphere of electricity supply.” Natalia Boyko, Deputy Minister of Energy and Coal Industry, saidthat the law provides for the “transitional” period (24 months from the date of entry into force). During this period, the necessary technical, organizational, economic and regulatory prerequisites for the introduction and smooth operation of the market must be created. Over this period, the Ministry of Energy and the National Commission for Energy and Utilities Regulation shall prepare more than 100 subordinate legislative acts. 2. Law on compulsory redemption and sale of shares(№1983-VIII). The law harmonizes certain corporate management standards in joint-stock companies with the EU documents. MP Viktoria Ptashnyk explained that the law is part of the corporate management reform (along with the law on corporate contracts which was already adopted and the draft law on limited liability companies). It lays down a basis for civilized relations in joint-stock companies. According to Maksym Libanov from the National Securities and Stock Market Commission, the law has introduced a number of corporate management mechanisms. In particular: • a squeeze-out mechanism which provides for the right of a shareholder who (directly or indirectly) owns the controlling interest (95% of the shares) to redeem shares of other shareholders in a compulsory manner, • a sell-out mechanism which provides for the right of a minority shareholder (less than 5%) to sell their shares to a shareholder who owns 95% of the company in a compulsory manner, • a mandatory bid mechanism which establishes the obligation of the shareholder who acquired the controlling interest (50% + 1 share) or the substantial shareholding (75% of shares) to offer other shareholders to sell their shares, • a simplified mechanism for the transformation of public joint-stock companies into private companies or limited liability companies, which does not require that permits be reissued after such a transformation. A squeeze-out mechanism allows to redeem shares from those shareholders who do not have any influence on the company’s activities, yet, nevertheless, the company incurs significant expenses to inform these shareholders about the general meetings, payment of dividends, etc, said Denys Sakva from Dragon Capital. “The law contains three blocks of changes important for businesses – introduction of escrow accounts, changes in the procedure for pledging money in bank accounts, and the redemption of shares of minority shareholders,” says Zoya Mylovanova, VoxUkraine Law. “Thus, the legislator has removed one of the obstacles that, along with currency risks, restrictions on the withdrawal of capital, and others, forced even bona fide owners willing to pay taxes to formalize the sale of large businesses outside Ukraine.” 3. w on the autonomization of healthcare establishments (2002-VIII). The law allows to reorganize healthcare establishments from budgetary institutions into non-profit enterprises. Such opportunities have existed before, but the procedures were too complicated. The adopted law simplifies the reorganization and introduces new mechanisms of managing such enterprises. “According to the law, healthcare establishments shall become similar in status to any other enterprise,” explains Pavlo Kovtoniuk, Deputy Minister of Healthcare. “So far, due to vertical management they have been functioning as budgetary institutions in line with the Soviet standards.” Their managers had no freedom of action and were guided by the top-down instructions in the form of orders and decrees. The law introduces a concept of a “healthcare service” which allows to receive funds from any source of financing in a legitimate and transparent manner, to select the heads of healthcare establishments through competition, and to set up supervisory boards and boards of trustees. The autonomization of healthcare establishments has been made voluntary – as a compromise at the request of the specialized committee of the Verkhovna Rada. “Those healthcare establishments that decide to become non-profit enterprises will receive preferential terms for reorganization. Mandatory assessment of property which is usually required in case of reorganization will no longer be necessary. These enterprises will become successors to all the rights and obligations of the relevant budgetary institutions,” said MP Iryna Sysoyenko. “A new form of management opens up many opportunities for a healthcare establishment,” says Yaroslav Kudlatskyi, Kyiv School of Economics, “from changing the organizational structure to attracting new sources of funding other than governmental funds. The hospitals will finally be able to decide independently which services or equipment to order. This should make provision of medical care more economically efficient and improve the quality of services.” Gloomy outlook A number of draft laws are yet to be signed by the President. Once they are signed, it might influence the iMoRe dynamics in the third quarter of 2017. Further progress will greatly depend on the parliament’s ability to shape the necessary legislative preconditions for the reforms in the spheres of healthcare, the pension system, the land market, privatization, and the reboot of the civil service. Given the fact that the last plenary meeting of the current (sixth) session was held on July 14 and the next one will take place in September after the vacations, it will not be easy to find the necessary time and adopt the laws important for these reforms during the third quarter. --- Source: https://voxukraine.org/2017/07/20/train-ukraine-future-in-which-direction-did-the-country-move-in-the-second-quarter-of-2017/

"Ukraine opens beneficial ownership database"

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"Number of unemployed in Ukraine decreased by 14% for a year - State Statistics Service"

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16 August, 2017

"Germans interested in investing in alternative energy development in Ukraine"

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"Ukrsadprom and U.S. Embassy prepare report on business prospects of fruits and vegetables production in Ukraine"

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15 August, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine Re-Invented Ukraine is about to celebrate 26 years of independence. This period was marked by major criminal activity, high inflation, looting of the treasury and state assets, systematic corruption, unstable currency, two revolutions and failure of the banking system. The annexation of Crimea and a proxy war by Russian Federation in the east of the country also blighted the country. During these turbulent years the only thing that kept the country from falling apart was the unrelenting struggle of the Ukrainian people for democracy, independence and economic prosperity. It is our view that current years will be remembered in history, as time when Ukraine started a long awaited turnaround to reach its full potential and become a major economic power on the world stage. Here is why: 1. Economic Growth Potential Numbers tell the story. In 2015 Ukraine’s GDP was 3 times less than in Poland and 10 times less than in Germany. GDP per capita in Ukraine was 6 times less than per Polish citizen and 20 times less per German citizens. Yet, Ukraine’s territory is almost twice as big as either Germany or Poland. It is my view that execution of the strategy outlined in this document will lead to $700-billion-dollar expansion of Ukraine’s GDP and 3x times increase in income per capita income in the next decade. 2. Human Resource Ukraine has one of the most educated labor forces in the world. Ukraine’s human resource is the most undervalued asset of the country. Ukraine’s demographics tells us that 40% of population is under 40. The young people of Ukraine are smart, ambitious and willing to learn. Most all citizens of Ukraine are seeking an opportunity to work hard, transparently, efficiently and profitably. They need a vision and will from the leaders of Ukraine. 3. Asset Value Across the Ukrainian economy assets of all classes and types are at the lowest level in their short history. The majority of infrastructure requires massive investment but also offers great opportunity to earn outsized returns on capital. Company valuations are extremely low in comparison to similar companies in the west. Ukrainian cost of labor is one of the lowest in the world. Tens of billions of dollars could be made practically in every sector of the economy in the next decade. 4. Geographic Location Ukraine’s location is extremely strategic. Within easy reach of the EU, Asia, Middle East and Africa, Ukraine has the potential to become a leader in global distribution. --- Ukraine’s brand and image needs a MAJOR MAKEOVER to achieve its economic goals. UGTI Inc. proposes 5 areas that must become cornerstone of Ukraine’s image in the world. Organic Today Ukraine has an opportunity to become a leading ORGANIC exporter. During Soviet times, the Republic of Ukraine was known as the “breadbasket” of Europe. It could become known as a leading ORGANIC country in the new world order. Ukraine’s massive potential in agricultural sector will be only magnified by organic certification. It will drive 20% to 40% higher margins (depending on the crop) to the benefit of Ukrainian farmers. Multinationals of all types from Walmart on down are struggling to fulfill the demand for organic food by populations worldwide. Ukraine has an opportunity to fulfill this need and attract massive investment in Agro sector. “Organic Ukraine” in addition to being massive economic driver, will also serve as a great differentiator in the global marketplace. It will add enormous value to brand UKRAINE. Brain Power One of the things Communism did right for its people was to instill great deal pride in their education. This trend continues to this day in every family in Ukraine. It is estimated that there is over $1 trillion of Intellectual Property developed by Ukrainians lying dormant and waiting for monetization. Further, the opportunity lies in utilization of this untapped human resource in the areas of science and engineering. These highly educated individuals earn on average of less than $15,000 per year in Ukraine vs $200,000 + equivalent level talent in the United States. It is an opportunity for savings for corporations, academic institutions and governments of the West, while simultaneously doubling or tripling income of Ukraine’s scientific and engineering community. Logistics Heaven It does not take a brilliant economist to realize what a valuable asset Ukraine’s geographic location is. Unfortunately, current situation related to the infrastructure in Ukraine does not allow it to take advantage of this significant asset. Yet, this also presents one of the greatest economic opportunities not only for the country but also for investors of all types. The country is in a desperate need to invest in roads, ports, airports, energy and industrial parks throughout the country. Today, simply due to bad roads, Ukraine is losing billions of dollars in economic activity. Lack of infrastructure adds additional negative element in consideration for FDI into the country. Instead of liability, Ukraine’s infrastructure should become one of the country’s major assets. UGTI Inc. believes based on the proven track record of infrastructure development in other countries dealing with the same challenge, the plan could be developed for specific implementation steps for the countrywide development and monetization of Ukraine’s infrastructure. BioMass production Superpower There is a major need in the world for biomass. Today, there are hundreds of technologies that convert something into a bio product. Unfortunately, there is simply not enough biomass production in the world today to meet fast growing demand posed by technologies. The facts are that industrial global biomass production remains in its infancy. Ukraine can be the first in the world to produce biomass on industrial and countrywide levels.Over 4,000,000 hectares of highly fertile land are not utilized in Ukraine today. Further, millions more hectares of land not suitable for edible crops are available to produce crops as biomass. After years of research, many recommend and predict that the crop Miscanthus will become the game changer for Ukraine and the world in biomass production. Global Destination Ukraine’s potential in Hospitality and Tourism offers an opportunity to become a world-class destination. The country can offer great value to tourists in areas of nature, history, religion, education, art, sports, entertainment, science and natural medicine 12 months per year. From the Ukraine’s brand standpoint of view, it is a low hanging fruit. In my humble opinion Ukraine represents one the BEST GLOBAL opportunities for outsides returns for the next decade. But for the industry to become a major economic driver for the country, the Ukrainian government must heavily invest in the infrastructure throughout the country and promotion of Ukraine as a destination worldwide. In comparison to many other destinations in the world, Ukraine offers a great deal of value for every dollar spent. The cost of hotels, food and entertainment are significantly lower for the value received in comparison to most global destinations. Further, due to a very low asset value, it offers great investor opportunity for multinational developers and operators at this time and for decades to come. It is my belief that now is high time to invest in Hospitality and Tourism industry of Ukraine

"EBRD mulling opportunities to develop hryvnia-pegged crediting, investment in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine boosts revenues for agricultural exports by $2 bln in H1"

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14 August, 2017

"Antonov State Enterprise seeks to pass FAA certification by late 2020, switch to NATO standards"

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"Germany investing $10 mln in development of small and medium enterprises in Ukraine"

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12 August, 2017

"Waste recycling plant to be built in Kharkiv Region – GOVT resolution"

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"Ukrainian government to renew cooperation with US in science and technologies"

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11 August, 2017

"Agrovesna 2011 berry cooperative seeking investor in building agroindustrial park in Kyiv region"

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"Ukraine’s GOVT wants to introduce single account for taxpayers"

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10 August, 2017
KRZYSZTOF STANOWSKI Former president of Solidarity Fund PL UGTI on Facebook Poland’s Revolutionary Lessons for Ukraine In the last thirty years, Ukraine has undergone three revolutions: the Revolution on Granite (1990), the Orange Revolution (2004-2005), and the Revolution of Dignity (2013-2014)—each about different values. The first one was about the right to independence, the second about fair elections, and the third about the right to choose the country’s geopolitical direction. For Poles who planned and participated in the revolution of the 1980s, the key was to be ready for the window of opportunity—have an idea, clear demands, a plan for reforms, and ready leaders. On average, a country is presented with a chance for change every fifty years. Ukraine seems to be an exception and gets its chance every ten years. It took Poland several attempts to be more independent and prepared. Over the course of 124 years, Poland saw an uprising and unsuccessful attempt to return independence every thirty years. Each generation wanted this and was ready to do this. The Warsaw uprising of 1944, the Poznan 1956 protests, the student demonstrations of March 1968, the Polish 1970 protests, the 1976 workers’ protests, and the Solidarity strike of 1980—all these attempts prepared Poland for the right moment. Poland didn’t have one leader. Lech Wałęsa was a hero. There were many leaders, including deputies and deputy assistants. The latter were tasked with preparing to lead and continue the cause if the first two levels were arrested or killed. Such preparation should be based on teaching values and responsibility to the country. And when the time comes to make a change, it’s important to have many candidates for public service. In the preparation stage, self-education plays a critical role. Poland published nearly a thousand different weekly underground newspapers, even though someone caught working at one could be imprisoned for three years during martial law. This meant that censorship was ineffective. Poland had discussions about reforms five years prior to 1989. They were held in prisons, universities, and education clubs. That meant that at the moment of change, Poland was ready for reforms. When it’s time to implement reforms, it must be done quickly. The Balcerowicz plan was implemented in ninety days, while local self-government reform was done in 180 days after the formation of the first government. The implementation of reforms is critical in the first days because that’s when people are willing to make sacrifices. After Poles won the revolution, they didn’t return home but instead embarked upon reforms. Their next task was to make real changes at the local level. With reforms, the first ten years are the hardest because it’s not fully clear what impact they have. At a time when Moscow wants Ukraine to focus on war, Kyiv’s future depends on carrying out reforms. Otherwise, it will not only lose the opportunity presented by the last revolution, it will also jeopardize its independence. Ukraine’s path toward sustainable growth is through local self-government and education reform. It’s another philosophy of nation-building and another way of assuming responsibility for a community, instead of waiting for the central government to do everything. Decentralization is not only the most critical reform for Ukraine, but it’s the cheapest option. Without these reforms, Ukraine will always be waiting for a strong leader. If it doesn’t want to wait for the “good Tsar,” the only alternative is to transfer authority to local governments. In April-May 2014, constitutional decentralization seemed to have been within reach. Unfortunately, that didn’t happen. The two reforms that were implemented were amendments to tax and budget codes, which allocated funds to local authorities and unified territorial communities. Real changes are happening in Ukraine where there are unified communities. They have real authority, money, and make local policy. In more than forty cities across Ukraine, citizens are now more actively engaged thanks to the participatory budgeting mechanism; they get to vote on and submit various development projects. People need to have an opportunity to count the money, make decisions, and make mistakes along the way. But these will be their own mistakes, not the president’s, and they will learn from them. Only when people feel responsible and form unified communities in at least half of Ukraine can we say Ukraine’s reforms are irreversible. There is no need to convince people of the importance of having a strong local self-government. They understand it and are ready for it, but they have one condition: assurance that it’s the real deal and not a joke. The second important reform is education. A school is the first public institution where a relationship between the individual and the state is formed. People are willing to pay to improve the quality of education for their children. Poland drastically improved the quality of its education by transferring it to local self-government. Schools must become community cultural centers, be open to NGOs and parents, teach beyond the classroom walls, and have democratic procedures, including student self-government councils, parent-teacher associations, and teaching councils. In conclusion, the Polish local government reforms were successful because they were apolitical. The Polish cities had professional mayors, not politicians. Poland’s experience demonstrates the need to remove politics and party affiliation from municipal governance and find people ready to work as professionals without political ambitions. --- Krzysztof Stanowski is a former president of Solidarity Fund PL. He served as Under Secretary of State at the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs from 2010 to 2012 and Under Secretary of State at the Polish Ministry of National Education 2007 to 2010. Stanowski gave this lecture, “From Three Revolutions to a Stable Democracy in Ukraine,” at the Ukraine Crisis Media Center on May 29, 2017. This lecture was translated from Ukrainian into English and abridged and edited for clarity by Vera Zimmerman. --- Source: http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/ukrainealert/poland-s-revolutionary-lessons-for-ukraine

"Agriculture Ministry and Kyivstar will develop digital platform for farmers"

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"World Bank ready to use ProZorro to procure goods, services in Ukraine"

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9 August, 2017

"Qatar simplifies visa regime with 80 countries, including Ukraine"

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"Production of passenger cars in Ukraine 51% up in July 2017"

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8 August, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook The Cyber-Attack on Ukraine (Is America Next?) This week, something different. I would like to thank Gary Glennell Toms, creator and Managing Editor of this site and "The G-Man Interviews" (http://fromthegman.blogspot.com/) and former associate editor, reporter and columnist for "The Wave of Long Island" for taking the time to interview me about the recent cyberattacks on Ukraine and the need for and value of US-Ukraine cybersecurity cooperation. Mr. Toms broke stories that were later picked up by "The New York Times", "The Daily News" and "Newsday", among others. He has received numerous awards for journalism and community service. Have a listen: Foreword: http://fromthegman.blogspot.com/2017/07/the-cyber-attack-on-ukraine-is-america.html Interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3-XXrsefpo&feature=youtu.be

" International reserves of Ukraine have already grown by 15% this year"

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"France to assist Ukraine in building solar power stations in exclusion zone in Chornobyl"

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7 August, 2017

"Ukraine, Iran review agro-economic ties"

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"U.S. company to invest in gold mining in western Ukraine"

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5 August, 2017

"Ukraine repaid $450 million to the IMF"

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"Ukraine scheduled to install 150 Bitcoin ATMs in 2017"

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4 August, 2017

"Ukraine will be able to invest 50 bln in road repair in a year"

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"Energomashspetsstal ships two ROTORS for Indian Bhel’s turbine"

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3 August, 2017
CURTIS “BJ” BJELAJAC Executive Director at Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU) UGTI on Facebook STCU History and Major Accomplishments The Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU) is an intergovernmental organization dedicated to nonproliferation of technologies and expertise related to weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, and their delivery systems. The STCU was the first intergovernmental organization in Ukraine and was established by an Agreement signed on 25 October 1993, by the four Founding Parties: Canada, Sweden, Ukraine, and the United States of America. The Agreement came into force on 4 May 1994, when Ukrainian President Kravchuk issued a decree accepting the STCU Agreement. The STCU became fully operational when it held its first Governing Board Meeting on 14-15 December 1995. Later, the European Union acceded to the STCU Agreement in November 1998, replacing Sweden as a Governing Party to the STCU Agreement. Over the years, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Moldova, and Uzbekistan joined STCU as member parties. Today, the STCU is headquartered in Kyiv and has field offices in Baku, Chisinau, and Tbilisi as well as in Kharkiv. Japan has also participated as a special sponsor of STCU projects. Since the first STCU Governing Board meeting in 1995, STCU has sponsored over 1,700 cooperative science research projects amounting to over $274 million (USD equiv.) in research grant funding to Ukrainian, Azerbaijani, Georgian, Moldovan, and Uzbek scientists. STCU has engaged nearly 21,000 scientists, of which approximately 12,000 were former weapon scientists during the Soviet era. From 1995 until today, STCU had awarded the following amounts of project funding to scientists and technicians in the STCU Recipient Parties: Azerbaijan = $7.0M (USD equivalent) Georgia = $16.6M (USD equivalent) Moldova = $3.2M (USD equivalent) Ukraine = $230.7M (USD equivalent) Uzbekistan = $16.5M (USD equivalent) Total Project Funding = $274.0M (USD equivalent) As part of its non-proliferation mission, the STCU has also connected these scientists to a wide variety of governmental- and non-governmental Partners. From 1995 until today, STCU has managed over $124 million USD equiv. in R&D projects sponsored by these external partners, including governmental programs and many American, Canadian, and European businesses. From 1995 until today, the total project funding contribution from STCU Funding Parties and other donors has been as follows: Canadian Government = $10.0 million (USD) European Commission = €49.5 million (Euros) Other European Government organizations = $7.8 million (USD equivalent) Japanese Government = $1.04 million (USD) Swedish Government = $1.67 million (USD) U.S. Government = $144.5 million (USD) All non-governmental and private sector partners = $47.0 million (USD). Why Work via the STCU? As you can see from the figures presented above, the STCU has a long, successful history of working with both government and non-government partners. The case for working via the STCU is clear, as you can see from the list of benefits outlined below: Guaranteed business security, reliability and confidentiality Clear and transparent financial operations Tax-free grants to scientists through their individual bank accounts Annual financial statement audits performed by Big Four accounting firm and available on STCU website Custom clearance assistance free of all duties and taxes Project auditing and monitoring, timely delivery of scientific reports and results Host government concurrence Professional Project Management Complete compliance with the legal systems of our member countries Knowledge of the scientific community and its capabilities Thorough understanding of local business practices Contact the STCU today and allow us to improve your Ukrainian R&D investment experience: - Elena Taberko STCU Senior Specialist - Tel: +380-44-490-7150 Fax: +380-44-490-7145 E-mail: elena.taberko@stcu.int Web site: www.stcu.int Address: 7a Metalistiv St. Kyiv, Ukraine 03057

"DTEK launches first solar power plant"

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"Envoy: Iran, Ukraine economic ties in post-JCPOA increases by 32%"

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2 August, 2017

"Vega LV powered by Ukrainian engine successfully puts two satellites into orbit"

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"Ukrteplo seeks to invest UAH 2.5 bln in biofuel CHPP, ethanol plant in Odesa region"

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1 August, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine – a global leader in production of “GREEN OIL” We know the world is changing. We have invested tens of billions into a new BIO technologies of all kind to make human impact on the environment more sustainable. Me made a lot of progress. Not nearly enough but we are on the right track. One MAJOR problem to be solved – lack of biomass. With all these technologies converting something into bio product, one needs biomass to do it. Ukraine now has an opportunity to become a global leader in production of biomass. Our team would like to present to you a VERY unique crop that can do a job that help all of humanity. 1. About Miscanthus •Longevity - Miscanthus is planted in spring and once planted can remain in the ground for at least fifteen to twenty years. •Growth - New shoots emerge around March each year, growing rapidly in June-July, producing bamboo-like canes. The Miscanthus dies back in the autumn/winter, the leaves fall off, providing nutrients for the soil, and the canes are harvested in winter or early spring. This growth pattern is repeated every year for the lifetime of the crop. Miscanthus spreads naturally by means of underground storage organs known as rhizomes. •Harvesting - All propagation, maintenance and harvest operations can be done with conventional farm machinery, but dedicated Miscanthus planters produce the most even establishment. •Water Access Requirements - Annual rainfall and soil water retention will strongly influence the yield of Miscanthus at any site. Miscanthus possesses good water use efficiency when considered on the basis of the amount of water required per unit of biomass and Miscanthus roots can penetrate and extract water to a depth of around 2m. •Fertilizer Requirements - The annual fertilizer demands of the crop are very low, due to good nutrient use efficiency and the plant’s ability to re-cycle large amounts of nutrients into the rhizomes during the latter part of the growing season. As a consequence, nutrient off-take at harvest is low. Since the leaves predominately remain in the field it is only necessary to account for the amount of nutrients removed in the stems. The nutrient requirements during the following seasons are met by leaf litter decomposition, natural soil nutrient reserves, rhizome reserves and atmospheric depositions. •Removal of Miscanthus - Miscanthus can easily be removed from an existing site by the application of a post-emergence non-selective herbicide such as glyphosate, followed by normal cultivation such as ploughing. Continuous mowing can be used as an alternative to using a non-selective herbicide to kill the Miscanthus (this exhausts the rhizome). Miscanthus is non-invasive culture. •Carbon Savings - Miscanthus takes up as much carbon as is released when it is burnt so there is no net increase in CO2 into the atmosphere. Some additional carbon is sequestered in the soil from root and rhizome growth. •Cover for Wild Life - Miscanthus provides cover for most of the year because, although the crop is harvested annually, it is harvested shortly before the following year’s growth begins. This cover can act as a wildlife corridor linking existing habitats such as crop margins, woodlands and hedgerows. For example, Miscanthus is grown on several shooting estates for its value as a game cover crop and nursery for young pheasants and partridges. A recent study showed there to be an immediate benefit to biodiversity due to providing an over winter site for birds, small mammal and invertebrates. 2. Miscanthus Technical Composition •Miscanthus is a perennial, rhizomatous, C4 grass, of the Poaceae Family originates from Asia Miscanthus can store around 30% of its total dry matter in root and rhizome . Other C4 species include, switchgrass, sorghum and maize. C4 plants capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere via photosynthesis much more efficiently than the traditional C3 crop and woody plants wild germplasm. The other advantages of perennial rhizomatous grasses are that they establish quickly relative to woody tree crops and at harvest they have substantially lower moisture content. •Energy ratio and value: The energy ratio of Miscanthus Giganteus has been calculated to be at 1 : 32, it is greater than that of any other current agricultural crop including SRC willow (1:30), wheat (1:9) or oil seed rape (1:4) .The energy content of MG is approximately 19 MJ kgˉ¹. One hectare produces the equivalent energy of 3,300 – 5,700 liters of light heating oil and an average medium sized house will burn around 3000 liters of oil per year, depending on yield. 3. Key INDUSTRIES for “Green Oil”: •Biofuels •Bioenergy •Biobased products •BioPlastics & Composites •Cellulosic Fiber production •Construction •Biochemical •Biopharmaceutical 4. Applications in the real Economy – a “Green Oil” of 21st Century •Heat & Electricity generation from solid biomass •Heat & Electricity generation biogas •Cellulose as a raw material •Fibers for car parts •Straw products •Wood fibrous products •Flax fibrous products •Hemp fibrous and lime fibrous products •Organic Pellets production •Bio-Ethanol Bio-Jet fuel •Bio-Gas •Bio-Plastics •Bio-Composites •Bio-Polymers •Bio-Adhesives •Bio-Coatings •Bio-Degradable packaging •Textiles •Equine Bedding •Furniture 5. Ukraine aims to be a Global leader in BioMass production The following are competitive advantages of Ukraine: •Low cost of land acquisition - $400 to $500 per hectare per year for lease rights. •Up to 25 years Land Lease vs. Purchase. Annual lease rates around $100 per hectare. •Unlimited opportunity for land acquisition to satisfy needs of any size corporation. Currently 4, 000,000 hectares of Ukraine’s arable are not in use. •Low labor costs are one of the lowest in the world. •Geographic location with easy access to EU, Asia, CIS countries and shipping routes to North and South America. •Free trade zone with EU. No tariffs on anything coming out Ukraine into Europe. •Support of National, Regional and Local Governments. •Highly Educated Human Resource. •Supply Chain diversification. •Low Utilities costs. •New Markets of Eastern Europe and CIS countries. •Customizable and scalable solutions from raw material to finished product.

"China intends to increase imports of food products from Ukraine"

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"SPF offers leasing of facilities of Chornobyl NPP on 2.5 mln sq m to place solar power plant"

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31 July, 2017

"Number of air passengers will grow to 20 mln per year in four years"

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"Canada sees launch of free trade with Ukraine as a priority"

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29 July, 2017

"Four factors of US interest for struggle against corruption in Ukraine"

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"Poland to allocate USD 500,000 for business development in eastern Ukraine"

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28 July, 2017

"5th Ukrainian-Korean Economic Forum opens in Kyiv"

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"Boryspil Airport saw a 77% rise in net profit in H1 2017"

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27 July, 2017
VALERIY KOVALSKYY Remote Sensing Scientist at The Climate Corporation UGTI on Facebook Digital Agriculture and Biotech to Modernize the Old Breadbasket of Europe Historically, the agricultural potential of Ukraine has been perceived as an asset of such high value and strategic significance that it has been hotly fought over in every major European war with at least some combat east of the Danube river. Despite the assets inherent value and Ukraine’s massive agricultural potential, post WWII Soviet occupation has eroded the glory of Europe’s Breadbasket as the fruits of farmers’ labor and their land were taken by the communist state. This removed the drive for innovation in agriculture, and left no incentive to increase productivity. Since independence the Ukrainian agricultural sector has struggled to rise from the ashes of a ruinous planned economy, and also from an absolutely unfounded fear among many Ukrainians of full-fledged private ownership of land. Recent political developments, however, have increased the number of supporters among your average citizen and politicians alike for land reform. Understanding among Ukrainians is growing that effective private land ownership will open the gates for farmer credit and consequently for western markets and technologies to deliver a multiple fold increase of agricultural output and revenue. A number of western agricultural companies anticipated this change and have been actively looking for and developing opportunities to work with Ukrainian partners in this sector. These partnerships can bring not only access to new markets and increased market share in existing ones but also equipment and seed sales and knowledge based decision making based on research and development focused on Ukrainian crops, Ukrainian soils and Ukrainian weather conditions. Ukraine is indeed an “Eldorado” for development of hybrid seeds as the country spans in three climatic zones representative of all Central and Eastern Europe, as well as Eurasian Grain Belt. In these regions, highly productive western hybrid seeds will need action plans to face local weather patterns, competition for nutrients from local wheats and infestation form local pests and diseases. Profound local knowledge in Ukraine about the country’s particularities will have a significant impact on the commercial success of foreign Biotech companies coming to this market. Digital Agriculture is a recent development that is quickly becoming an integral part of farming and Biotech operations in the West. It began with advances in precision equipment and sensor technology and now incorporates big data insights placing the power of actionable information at the ready disposal of farmers. With Digital Agriculture all these components are combined with expert knowledge to deliver far more than just specialized farming advice. Transformed into algorithms this knowledge reaches out to broadest base of farmers offering solutions optimized both agronomically and financially. The core value of Digital Agriculture as an industry will also be generated in Ukraine, as the country offers ample resources of skilled IT professionals, aerospace engineers, agronomists and also soil, hydrology, weather and data scientists. Several smaller scale Digital Agriculture projects have already been successfully carried out in Ukraine through partnerships between local Ukrainian companies and teams with world leaders in Biotech. Investment in such enterprises is projected to pay off in a fairly short period of time because it will support outstanding work of dedicated and experienced teams. The success here is based first on proven results, second - on established partnerships with farmers who help testing developed solutions, and third - on well cultivated relationships with local academic and research organizations. This human potential will also be well matched by 80 million acres of prime arable land in Ukraine making it one of the most attractive markets for expansion. The opportunity for Digital Agriculture and Biotech business in Ukraine is calling for more western companies to change their position from observers to players on this emerging market. Together with their Ukrainian partners they have a great chance to build their own success and help turning Old Breadbasket of Europe into New and Advanced Stronghold for Global Food Security.

"FTA between Ukraine and Canada comes into effect on august 1"

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"German-Ukrainian trade turnover increases by 22% - German statistics"

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26 July, 2017

"Ukrgazvydobuvannia announces tender to attract investors to restore over 1,900 liquidated wells"

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"Groysman believes Ukraine to be energy independent by 2020"

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25 July, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Energy Security in Ukraine: Need and Opportunity Several years ago, the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), conducted a survey on the subject of technological investment in Ukraine. Its respondents were a mix of private and public sector individuals and companies. The survey identified three primary motivations to invest in technologies: 1. Energy security 2. Reduction of operational costs 3. Existing legal and regulatory requirements Similar results are seen across similar surveys because respondent’s motivations align with the biggest problems that they are facing, and without question one of biggest problems facing Ukraine today is energy security (or more precisely, the absence of it). Over the coming weeks, I will highlight clean and/or sustainable energy technologies including: 1. Gradual oxidization of waste gas (featuring Ener-Core, www.ener-core.com). 2. Heat pumps and related heating and cooling systems (featuring Bosch, www.bosch.com). I thank Alain Castro, my friend, colleague and the CEO of Ener-Core for contributing to the content below. This week I focus on Ener-Core, which deploys the first and only technology in the world that can reduce air emissions from industries (virtually any industry with waste gases is a candidate for this solution) while at the same time enabling these industries to use these waste gases to generate clean power. The target industries are the largest emitters of waste gases, and include oil & gas, mining, waste, steel production, food and paper, distilleries, landfills, sewage plants, etc. Ener-Core estimates the target market at somewhere around $75 Billion. Ener-Core’s solution will not only help these industries comply with the highest environmental standards in the world, but also increase their economic efficiency because by converting their waste gases into power they generate their own power (from a "free" fuel) and reduce the power they purchase from the utility. This impacts the bottom line quickly and significantly. Most (if not all) environmental solutions that are available for these industries represent a way of destroying emissions, but they also represent a cost burden to industrial activity. There is no financial payback on emissions destruction equipment. Companies only spend money on this equipment to comply with environmental regulations on air pollution. Ener-Core changes the way the world will utilize and manage waste gases, turning a waste into a valuable resource while reducing pollution. Here are 2 short videos that provide a simple overview of the Ener-Core market, its technology and the current status of deployment (with a link to information on operational units around the world). Ener-Core: Overview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PB1Mc2O4wpI Ener-Core - Converting Air Pollution into Clean Energy, Profitably https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIwJNOF-SQU Operational Units Around the World http://www.ener-core.com/technology/operational-units A key Ener-Core advantage is the ability to utilize a gas fuel source too low quality for use by others. Ener-Core defines "low quality" gases in 2 different ways: Low-BTU gases & Highly Contaminated Gases. 1. Low-BTU gas, which is too low for combustion. These are gases with a methane percentage contents from 2% - 30% (most reciprocating engines and turbines cannot operate on fuels with methane contents below 30%). We find that these low-BTU fuels have no commercial value. After all, they cannot be sold into a gas pipeline, and they cannot be used to generate heat or power (at least not with existing technologies). These gases are common on older landfills, wastewater treatment plants, coal mines, alcohol distilleries, etc. The gases that are emitted from these sites are usually too weak to even ignite. So, if industries cannot ignite it, they surely cannot use it to generate power with a combustion engine or a combustion turbine. And hence, these gases simply get discarded. 2. Highly contaminated gases. These gases are found in plastics plants, chemical plants, steel mills, oil refineries, food processing plants, etc. Just as an example, let’s highlight oil refineries. When associated petroleum gas (APG) is separated from crude oil, it typically has high levels of hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, butane, and pentanes), and also has high levels of H2S (sour gas) and CO2 (acid gas). The emissions of these gases directly to the atmosphere are not acceptable by the air quality standards in most countries. The conversion of these gases to energy is difficult, simply because traditional power generation technologies (ie. reciprocating engines and gas turbines) are not tolerant to high levels of H2S and CO2. Since APG typically contains impurities, it cannot be transported easily, and it cannot be used without intensive fuel treatment and/or contains too high a hydrocarbon content to be utilized by other technologies. Hence, these gases typically just get flared. While flaring these gases may indeed reduce the atmospheric emissions, it also wastes an energy resource that could have been used to generate useful power in remote locations, or to supply energy to a refinery. The Ener-Core Powerstation is able to operate on fuel gases that typically contain higher hydrocarbons, with as much as 2600 Btu/ft3, giving it an operating range advantage over other technologies. It can also operate with high H2S (sour gas) and CO2 (acid gas). So, the net benefit is that we can enable the reduction of flaring, reduce the gaseous emissions of the oil industry, and at the same time generate energy from this resource that is currently being wasted. Regardless of whether the focus is on low-BTU gases, or on highly contaminated gases, Ener-Core is developing an entirely new market for power generation from gases that are currently being flared or vented around the world. In the attached “Ener-Core Company Overview” you will see on page 6 an attempt estimate how much power could be generated from waste gases: 65-100 GigaWatts. This means that our society could generate enough power from its waste gases to directly power 1/3 of the United States population. Note that these estimates are likely low because (i) Ener-Core used data from country governments which have an incentive to underestimate how much waste gas they pump into the atmosphere and (ii) many 3rd world countries do not report this data or improperly capture it. So, if we could get hold of a database or a report that properly displays how much waste gas is pumped into the atmosphere by industries around the world, we would not be surprise to see estimates of the power generation opportunity become 2 times greater than formally estimated: 130-200 GigaWatts. Energy Security and Ener-Core: Conclusion There is no silver bullet for renewable power or for energy security. In other words, there is no one solution that will solve these challenges. The solutions to these challenges will depend on a variety of different technological solutions working together. Ener-Core is one of these solutions that can and should be considered as a part of the overall energy security challenge. For societies that need baseload power Ener-Core is attractive because its technology can utilize the gas wastes that are produced by a multitude of industries (oil refineries, landfills, coal mines, alcohol distilleries, wastewater treatment plants, etc.) to make baseload power. Today, all of these industries FLARE these waste gases. In other words, they simply burn them. Ener-Core deploys a technology that will make use of these waste gases by converting them to baseload power. In the case of Ukraine, Ener-Core estimated that there is approximately 1200 MW of power that "could" be generated from the waste gases that are getting flared/discarded by multiple industries (this calculation was based on data that includes waste-gas output in the Donbas). Based on these assumption, 1200 MW represents approximately 8% of Ukraine's power requirements.

"Ukraine’s top 100 SOEs see profits soar 20-fold in 9M16"

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"Pivdenmash extends contract for supply of engines for European Vega carrier rocket until 2020"

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24 July, 2017

"Assets of eight state-owned energy companies put up for sale"

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"Total investments in Ukrainian economy reached $4.4 bln in 2016"

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22 July, 2017

"Nearly 900 state-owned enterprises to be privatized in Ukraine"

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"State assets worth UAH 2 bln sold via ProZorro.Sales"

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21 July, 2017

"Poroshenko signs law on Energy Efficiency Fund"

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"Belarus, Ukraine urged to win third markets together"

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20 July, 2017
INNA MALIUKOVA, Ph.D. Co-founder of the Innovation Ecosystem «Sikorsky Challenge» UGTI on Facebook «Sikorsky Challenge»: from the innovation ecosystem of Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute to all-Ukrainian innovation platform "Sikorsky Challenge" innovation ecosystem has been created and developed over the past five years with the goal of cultivating technological ideas, developing start-up projects on their basis and creating small high-tech enterprises among scientific and engineering schools of the largest technical university in Ukraine - Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute. What is "Sikorsky Challenge" Innovation Ecosystem in the KPI? "Sikorsky Challenge" is a complex project of the university, which includes three main elements: Startup School, Business incubator, Festival of innovative projects (Picture 1). Innovation ecosystem performs important for the KPI and its partners' tasks: 1) involvement and selection of creative people willing to be engaged in innovative entrepreneurship, people from among inventors, scientists, graduates, and students; 2) teaching selected participants innovative entrepreneurship and assisting them in the development of prototypes; 3) searching for investors or business angels to invest into promising projects (first and second round of investments); 4) selection of the best projects for startup competition "Sikorsky Challenge" Festival; 5) participation in opening and launching of startup companies; 6) assistance and support in the protection of intellectual property rights (registration of copyrights, patents, licenses); 7) provision of legal, organizational, accounting support for a startup company up to the second round of investments; 8) assistance in bringing of a start-up company to the international level. Ecosystem tasks are solved in close interaction with all of its structural elements. However, each of them fulfills its specific functions. "Sikorsky Challenge" Startup School Startup School provides start-up training and preparation for the launch of innovative companies using special methodology (the "Sikorsky Challenge" technique) established in the development of the Innovation Ecosystem "Sikorsky Challenge". The leading role in the development of this technique is taken by a famous Israel start-up trainer Igor Peer, as well as by the team of trainers, mentors, KPI managers, and its business partners. Training in the Startup School takes place within three stages: The 1st stage is the provision of basic knowledge and skills necessary for a startup project development; 2nd stage - preparation of basically working product, satisfying the needs and solving problems of potential customers; The third stage is the attainment of practical skills and tools necessary for opening a start-up company and obtaining a pre-seed investment. At the same time, the requirements for participants and the effectiveness of their training are increasing from stage to stage. So, if all the interested may come to the basic first level (there can be 100 or more people), including those who do not have innovative ideas yet, then only those teams that have coped with the tasks for developing a start-up project are selected for each next stage, people have real results, motivation and perseverance to continue business. The absence of rigidly regulated terms of training is one of the key features of the Startup School. Only the first lesson at the 1st stage (one-day intensive 8-hour training) of each set (there are 4 ones per year) takes place according to a predetermined schedule. The remaining stages of the program are scheduled on an individual basis, depending on the speed and effectiveness of tasks execution. Therefore, the entire training cycle and the period to start a company can last from 3 months to 1 year (and in some cases even longer). During this time, participants can create prototypes of business products both in the Startup School prototype laboratories and use the equipment of KPI departments. "Sikorsky Challenge" start-up school was opened in February 2014. Over the past 3.5 years, about 500 students have completed training there. Among them, more than 50 teams received pre-seed and seed investments from business angels, foundations, and companies. «Sikorsky Challenge» business incubator The main role of the Business Incubator, established in August 2014, is to "pick up" start-up projects, investors are interested in - to provide mentoring, organizational, legal and accounting support to teams that are preparing to launch startup companies. At the same time, business incubator negotiates with potential investors about the terms of the investment agreement, equity participation and protection of intellectual property rights. Sikorsky Challenge Startup Contest A startup competition which takes place as part of Annual Festival of Innovative Projects is exactly the place and time when the business destiny of any startup can be defined. This is a platform where startup ideas/projects/teams meet with potential investors, where preliminary agreements on the intention to invest, develop and bring to the market start-up products are signed. The first "Sikorsky Challenge" Festival was held in 2012. As a result of five contests, over 80 projects have received investment and/or grant support. At the same time, since the opening of Startup School, the process of launching business products and commercializing scientific developments has become much more effective (Pic. 2). From October 10th to October 13th, 2017, there will be the 6th "Sikorsky Challenge” Festival, within the framework of which, in addition to the Startup Contest, an international Investor Forum will be held to accelerate the process of attracting investment in Ukraine's innovative business. Answering the question, what "Sikorsky Challenge" Innovative Ecosystem is, it must not be overlooked that this is a startup, constantly looking for the most effective business model, but it has already made successful steps during the first years of its development. We have competitive advantages both over educational MBA programs (training of managers for already operating businesses) and training companies (working in isolation from scientific and engineering schools) and also over Ukrainian business incubators which mostly select completed IT projects. Here are our advantages: 1) An endless stream of students, graduates, postgraduates, scientists with good engineering education in various technological fields; 2) Scientific and technical infrastructural support of innovators by KPI departments; 3) An opportunity to launch startups in various scientific and technical areas and spheres of economy (not only in IT field); 4) A high level of project management, headed by the rector of KPI Mr. Zgurovsky, one of the most famous innovators in the country; 5) A unique "Sikorsky Challenge" technique, which allows to attract innovative activities and train large streams of creative people and turn the best ideas into effective start-ups. Having received positive results in KPI in fall 2016 we have started scaling up our startup and created a network of Startup Schools in different regions of Ukraine. At the same time, the most advanced universities, from an innovation point of view, served as the basic structures. Today, 10 universities have joined our system: 1. Vinnytsia National Technical University (Vinnitsia) 2. Priazovskyi State Technical University (Mariupol) 3. National Mining University of Ukraine (Dnipro) 4. Kharkiv Petro Vasylenko National Technical University of Agriculture (Kharkiv) 5. Kharkiv National Technical University "Kharkov Polytechnic Institute" (Kharkiv) 6. Sumy State University (Sumy) 7. Poltava University of Economics and Trade (Poltava) 8. National University of Food Technologies (Kyiv) 9. National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine (Kyiv) 10. Zaporizhia National Technical University (Zaporizhia) The initial training for teachers and managers of these universities was conducted. In two of them (Mariupol and Vinnitsa) the first groups of students were trained according to "Sikorsky Challenge" techniques and start-ups were selected for subsequent incubation and introduction to the market. The opening of Startup Schools in the universities has become the center of crystallization of urban innovation ecosystem. At the same time, in order to develop high-tech entrepreneurship and support university start-ups, in cities such as Vinnytsia, Mariupol, Dnipro, and Kharkiv, urban innovation companies are being created. By investing in innovative projects, these companies receive significant shares in startup companies and related patents. As it can be seen scaling of Sikorsky Challenge project to other universities and cities of the country led to the creation of an all-Ukrainian innovation platform Sikorsky Challenge. Its efficiency depends on many factors, including an active position of region, city and university leaders, but the main factor is a desire to act. We have a desire! We are acting!

"Top 100 state companies of Ukraine see profit rise by 20 times in nine months of 2016"

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"IFC to provide up to $15 mln to new Horizon Capital’s fund investing in Ukraine"

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19 July, 2017

"Local budgets grow by 33% – Ukrainian Prime Minister"

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"PM announces new program to support farms"

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18 July, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine way to success is Sustainable Regional Development via Public Private Partnerships One of the major challenges for Ukraine is finding the way to include municipalities around Ukraine to build out nation-wide economic success. First and for most it means educating leaders at the regional and municipal level on how to work with international partners. Second, we need to secure western strategic partners to provide technology, management expertise and operational know-how. Third, we must provide financial resource ( strategic partner might be one of the sources) to execute deal based on credibility of strategic partner in partnership with local authorities. Here where is Public & Private partnership becomes a critical legal arrangement to bring critical project to reality. By definition a public–private partnership (PPP, 3P or P3) is a cooperative arrangement between two or more public and private sectors entities, typically of a long-term nature. Governments around the world have used such a mix of public and private endeavors throughout history. However, the past few decades have seen a clear trend towards governments across the globe making greater use of various PPP arrangements. Common themes of PPPs are the sharing of risk and the development of innovative, long-term relationships between the public and private sectors. The use of private finance is another key dimension of many PPPs. A P3 typically involves a private entity financing, constructing, or managing a project in return for a promised stream of payments directly from government or indirectly from users over the projected life of the project or some other specified period of time. There are many drivers for PPPs. One common driver involves the claim that PPPs enable the public sector to harness the expertise and efficiencies that the private sector can bring to the delivery of certain facilities and services traditionally procured and delivered by the public sector. Another common driver is that PPPs may be structured so that the public sector body seeking to make a capital investment does not incur any borrowing. Rather, the PPP borrowing is incurred by the private sector vehicle implementing the project. On PPP projects where the cost of using the service is intended to be borne exclusively by the end user, the PPP is, from the public sector's perspective, an "off-balance sheet" method of financing the delivery of new or refurbished public sector assets. On PPP projects where the public sector intends to compensate the private sector through availability payments once the facility is established or renewed, the financing is, from the public sector's perspective, "on-balance sheet"; however, the public sector will regularly benefit from significantly deferred cash flows. Financing costs can be offset by private sector efficiency, savings resulting from a holistic approach to delivering the project or service, and from the better risk allocation in the long run. UGTI Inc. in partnership with United Nations Habitat program for Sustainable Regional Development in Ukraine has all the tools, protocols and infrastructure in all regions of Ukraine to successfully execute Sustainable Regional development program throughout Ukraine. This solves most critical issue of execution facing all international agencies willing to provide economic help to Ukraine. Partnership between UGTI, UN Habitat, STCU and world class team of experts in each field significantly reduces and some cases completely eliminates most risks associated with execution of projects on the ground.

"Ukraine, Georgia seek to boost goods turnover between countries to at least $1 bln"

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"Ukraine exports nitrogen fertilizers for $72 mln, imports for $191 mln in h1, 2017"

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17 July, 2017

"EU Agrees to Allow in More Ukraine Exports for 3 Years"

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"IMF to create anti-corruption chambers in Ukrainian courts"

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15 July, 2017

"U.S. can allocate more than $410 mln to Ukraine for security in 2018"

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"Putin wants to restore economic ties with Ukraine "bloodlessly, in course of democratic processes"

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14 July, 2017

"China’s TBEA studying construction of large wind farm in Ukraine – energy ministry"

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"Annual revenues from exports to increase by $160 mln – Agrarian Policy Ministry"

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13 July, 2017

"World Bank improves Ukraine’s GDP growth forecast"

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"U.S. extends antidumping duty suspension agreement on certain oil tubular goods for Ukraine"

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12 July, 2017

"Ukrainian Chamber of Commerce and Industry to create Anti-crisis center for business cyber security"

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"Poroshenko: investment in Ukraine on the RISE"

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11 July, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook ACCRETEMARKETING, LLC accretemarketing llc (“accretemarketing”) is a UGTI partner and is ready to work with established Ukrainian brands (packaged and prepared foods, alcohol and others) to develop distribution, market penetration, and revenues in the United States. We believe the ideal scenario would be to secure a Ukrainian market leader without US market share whose financial strength, brand presence and commitments would present a viable and impressive growth for the products. accretemarketing is best suited for a role as the brand ambassador, tasked with the objective of identifying the correct party (or parties) that will fulfill the specific requirements establishing a profitable and sustainable revenue program. Simply put, this task requires market knowledge, experience in the industry, capacity to meet/entertain candidates and economic leadership to create and nurture the interest, secure the commitment and continue growing the opportunity. As the recent news of Ryanair pulling out of Ukraine following an inability to reach agreement with Kyiv Boryspil airport demonstrates, it is critically important to build trust between entities for a project to succeed. Once trust is established, partners will be willing to share the risks in a venture where, in the case of accretemarketing, they believe in the Ukrainian product. Based on my personal relationship with Stuart Rutchik, Co-founder and President of accretemarketing, I am confident that accretemarketting is the right partner to bring this service to Ukraine through UGTI. As evidenced by Mr. Rutchik’s bio, accretemarketing’s experience and marketing knowledge position accretemarketing and UGTI as the team to achieve results all parties desire. Stu and the accretemarketing team, thank you for working with UGTI in Ukraine. Together, we can succeed in business and help build a brighter future for Ukraine and Ukrainians. If you are a Ukrainian company with high quality products and are ready for the US market, please email me (aleks.m@ukrainegti.com) and Stu (stu@accretemarketing.com) with information about your company, products and objectives. ---- Stuart N Rutchik Phone:(301) 213-6181 Fax:(240) 720-9404 Email:stu@accretemarketing.com LinkedIn:www.linkedin.com/in/sturutchik Skype:stu.rutchik With more than 40 years in organization management, he has been directly involved with the development of business entities in various industries including life sciences, security systems integration, real estate development, manufacturing and construction. Each of his experiences utilized skills to design, implement and manage strategies for sales development, capital formation for profit and not-for-profit organizations, management development, creative marketing and business planning. These valuable core competencies provide clients with common sense knowledge and an out of the box perspective for problem solving, maintaining organization focus and managing the critical timeliness of activity, while the other members of the management team concurrently pursue their functional priorities. His strengths include organization management, budgeting, contract negotiations, and development of an appropriate sized infrastructure to address needs for operations, support, financial management, revenue generation and other key Company functions. Among his experiences, Stu has directly participated in the development, design and completion of private placements and loan package capitalization for several projects totaling direct funding of more than $50 million during his career. Additionally, Mr. Rutchik has been responsible for initiating, designing and executing sales & marketing programs that resulted in a 350+% growth in sales for a regional security systems integrator; economic/industrial development programs that generated 1000s of new jobs and millions of dollars in new business investment in the Washington, DC metropolitan area and in Fairfield County, Connecticut; and, profitable revenues, including international sales contracts, for a life sciences technology business. Working directly with client attorneys, accountants and other advisors, Mr. Rutchik has served well as a creative strategist, whose extensive experience and background provide a pragmatic approach to further the development and growth of organizations, including the innovation of new products and services. His education includes Bachelor of Arts and Master of Public Administration, Organization Development, from The American University.

"Turkey to sign free trade agreement with Ukraine this year"

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"Ukraine increases agricultural exports to Canada fivefold"

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10 July, 2017

"Tusk, Juncker, Mogherini to visit Kyiv to take part in Eu-Ukraine Summit on july 12-13"

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"Britain's foreign secretary praises Ukraine's progress in reforms over past three years"

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8 July, 2017

"Tillerson praises progress in Ukraine reform"

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"Representatives of world financial organizations express their readiness to assist in reforming Ukraine"

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7 July, 2017

"AIS starts imports of used electric cars from U.S."

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"Canadian business interested in trade with Ukraine under FTA agreement"

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6 July, 2017
The World Bank UGTI on Facebook Ukraine - Systematic Country Diagnostic : toward sustainable recovery and shared prosperity Ukraine has tremendous potential that has not yet been reached. Ukraine is endowed with intelligent, energetic, and entrepreneurial people; extraordinary fertile land; considerable natural resources; and a geographic location at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. There is no reason why Ukraine, under the right conditions, should not be among the league of prosperous and successful nations. The circumstances today, however, are of course, still far from that ultimate target. Ukraine’s GDP per person in 2015 was $2,115, while the corresponding figure was $12,500 for Poland, around $9,000 for Turkey and Romania, and $9,800 for Malaysia, and $13,000 for Argentina. The flip side of the current circumstances is that if Ukraine is able to put in place the right conditions, it will experience a period of strong economic growth as it catches up and converges to the levels of income of more prosperous nations. This Executive Summary from Systematic Country Diagnostic (SCD) for Ukraine is intended as an short evidence based diagnostic of the constraints and priorities to reduce poverty and promote shared prosperity in a sustainable way. The SCD is intended as an evidence‐based and integrative analytical report, combining analysis of growth, inclusion, and sustainability. The SCD is not intended to be limited to expected areas of World Bank Group (WBG) engagement, but is instead intended to assess what the country itself should do to advance its growth, poverty reduction, and shared prosperity objectives in a sustainable way. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY https://gallery.mailchimp.com/fc2ded176309d46ef7deb2bac/files/fd0fbf06-f11c-45bb-8e5a-8428b909d41c/Executive_Summary.01.pdf Source (full report): http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/268021494851394908/pdf/Ukraine-SCD-Document-April28-2017-05102017.pdf

"European Commission to allocate EUR 200 million in grant assistance to Ukraine"

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"Ukrainian-Belarusian Economic Forum to be held in Kyiv with participation of Poroshenko, Lukashenko"

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5 July, 2017

"NBU: International reserves of Ukraine grew by 16% for first half year"

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"Ukraine initiates launch of FTA talks with UK after Brexit – Groysman"

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4 July, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Integration of economic ecosystems in Ukraine Investment in any start up in any part of the world carries great deal of risk. It is a nature of the beast. If you add on top of it Ukraine, as a country risk associated with startup, things become very gloomy for thousands of startups trying to get to the world in Ukraine. So, we came up with a solution to fully integrate cooperation between promising start ups with small and medium size businesses in Ukraine, while we are building support infrastructure for both throughout the country. It is simple in concept: A. Protect Innovation B. Conduct independent review of the innovation C. Connect start up with SME in the same space to collaborate. SME, might become an angel investor, it might choose to acquire or license innovation, it might create a joint venture with innovators. It is all up both parties. D. Invest SEED capital to develop innovation into product and/or service E. Get sales going! But it is not easy to execute. Below all of the tools and instruments are being launched to make execution flawless. It is our believe that this will offer Ukraine to billions of dollars in economic activity. Intellectual Global Network of Ukraine - Ukraine Intellectual Lab for small & medium size enterprises ecosystem 1. Intellectual Global Network of Ukraine (“IGNU”) – in partnership with US-based IDEATION platform for managing innovation and collaboration within a confidential network will become a vehicle to generate revenue streams for companies in the network. To be selected into the network a company will be required to undergo an in-depth due diligence, maintain above a 75-point rating on the SFII National Rating Score and its core business must relate to one of the 20 scientific fields of Ukraine’s Sikorsky Platform. 2. State Financial Institution for Innovation (“SFII”) National Rating System – is 100 points Rating System for Ukraine’s corporations, scientists, engineers and executive level management covering areas like corporate governance, HR development, customer service and many others. Intended to become a “GOLD” standard for Ukrainian corporations. Companies, scientists, engineers and executive level management will be rated for the benefit of future strategic partners, institutional and private investors from around the world. Semi-annual ratings will be administered by SFII and published for maximum global exposure. 3. Intellectual Property Protection & Monetization – in partnership with leading United States based experts and the IDEATION platform, existing and newly developed intellectual property will be protected and immediately offered around the world for commercialization purposes. 4. Internal Organizational Structure & Operations – all SME’s in Ukraine that are seeking to be part of IGNU will go through an in-depth review of company operations. Management of each company will be provided with recommendations for adjustments deemed necessary to work effectively with companies outside Ukraine. All reviews and recommendations will be made by high level business professionals from the United States and other key countries. 5. Access to global capital resources – all companies within IGNU will be presented to a global investment community. Ukraine Sikorsky Platform, State Financial Institution for Innovation and BRIGGS Capital (US) will present the best opportunities for investors and strategic companies within key scientific fields to their network of established funding sources from around the world. All companies presented to funding sources will go through rigorous preparation prior to direct contact with any such funding sources. 6. Global Sales infrastructure – Ukraine Intellectual Lab (“UIL”) is a United States based company that will serve as the salesforce for all companies within Intellectual Global Network of Ukraine. It will offer governments, universities and corporations outside Ukraine opportunities to outsource design engineering, research & development, IP licensing, manufacturing, specialized human resource talent and customized educational programs. 7. Century and Sales Culture to drive revenues and profitsstManagement, Executive and Sales Education – as a member of IGNU each company will receive a practical and highly effective business education. Courses available to member companies will include: Taking Business to Next Level; Leadership for 21 Igor Sikorsy Kyiv Polytechnic Institute - MIT of Ukraine - Sikorsky Start Up Ecosystem 1. Sikorsky Challenge Business Competition – is the only nationwide business competition in Ukraine. It hosts local and regional competitions to select finalist celebrated every October in a week-long event on the campus of Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute (“KPI”), the National Technical University of Ukraine. 2. Sikorsky Challenge Business Incubator – will be developed and based on the best practices of world leading incubators in the such us Y Combinator and TechCrunch. Sikorsky Challenge Business Incubator will partner with leading incubators from around the world to allow companies graduating from Sikorsky Incubator to have global reach. 3. Sikorsky Challenge Entrepreneurship Apprentice School – entrepreneurial education with practical implementation that is difficult to access, or simply does not exist, in many regions of Ukraine. Entrepreneurship Apprentice School aims to prepare Ukraine’s labor force to integrate into a global Knowledge Economy. It will be operated and accredited by KPI in partnership with leading universities and colleges from around the world. Sikorsky Challenge Entrepreneurship Apprentice School will develop curriculum based on existing content from leading experts. 4. Sikorsky Challenge Salesforce – will provide domestic and international sales for companies within Sikorsky Incubator and members of Intellectual Global Network of Ukraine. 5. Sikorsky Challenge Co-working Hubs – will serve as centralized locations for technological & scientific clusters. Clusters will focus on technology transfer and provide space, administrative support, mentor services, educational seminars, sales & marketing services. Facilities will be established in major cities around Ukraine in partnership with local universities, domestic and international developers and US tech transfer offices. 6. Sikorsky Challenge Ecosystem Licensing Program – the program is designed to scale all components of Sikorsky Start Up ecosystem throughout Ukraine and neighboring countries. It is our opinion that full integration of startup and SME ecosystems makes great deal of sense for Ukraine. At UGTI, we are taking upon ourselves to execute it to benefit all!

"China’s Shandong Qingneng Power considering building biofuel tpp in lviv region"

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"Ukraine sets new record of grain exports in 2016/2017 my – agricultural ministry"

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3 July, 2017

"World Bank Mission arrives to Kyiv"

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"Ukrenergo initiates uniting strategic companies to resist to cyber attacks"

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1 July, 2017

"Trump announces intention to sell millions of tons of coal to Ukraine"

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"Ukraine Cyberattack Was Meant to Paralyze, not Profit, Evidence Shows"

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30 June, 2017

"China ready to invest government-secured $10 mln in construction of runway in Zhytomyr airport"

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"Ukraine to Increase Transparency, Efficiency in Public Resource Management, with European Union and World Bank Support"

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29 June, 2017

"Ukraine-Canada Free Trade Agreement enters force Aug 1"

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"EU ambassadors endorse agreement on temporary autonomous trade measures in favor of Ukraine"

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"Ukraine takes over Black Sea economic body's presidency"

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"H&M to enter Ukraine’s market in 2018"

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28 June, 2017

"Ukrainian cyber police receives over 1,000 Petya virus complaints in past 24 hours"

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"Nato warns cyber attacks 'could trigger Article 5' as world reels from Ukraine hack"

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27 June, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Cybersecurity, Vidder and the June 27, 2017 cyberattack in Ukraine As I wrote in my email release on June 14: “Ukraine now faces significant network-based cyberattacks to its’ private as well as public IT infrastructures. The country is extremely vulnerable to directed cyberattacks that target the power grid as well as both businesses and government institutions. It must deploy more effective counter-measures to stop network attacks. Unless corrective action is taken, the scale and damage inflicted by such attacks will only increase.” Today (June 27, 2017) Ukrainian banks, electricity firms, its major international airport, metro system, and corporate IT systems have been hit by a massiave and unprecedented cyber attack. See this recent Wired piece on Ukraine: How an Entire Nation Became Russia’s Test Lab for Cyberwar. https://www.wired.com/story/russian-hackers-attack-ukraine/ The origin of today’s attack remain unknown as of this writing. However, what is clear is the attacks originated in Ukraine, are spreading globally and Ukraine again finds itself in the eye of the storm of global cyber-crisis. That is the bad news. There is also good news. Vidder, Inc. (“Vidder”) PrecisionAccess™ can quickly cost effectively secure all of the systems hit today in Ukraine from future attack. Ukraine Cybersecurity, LLC is a subsidiary of UGTI and is focused exclusively on helping the Ukrainian government, military and private sectors solve difficult cybersecurity problems while gaining agility and cutting costs. We offer unique value to Ukraine through a partnership with Vidder a world-leading cybersecurity company founded in California’s Silicon Valley. Vidder is changing how modern enterprises approach security in the increasingly untrusted and diverse IT landscape. The company’s PrecisionAccess solution provides Trusted Access Control across internal networks, clouds, and external users. Security is enhanced by continually ensuring that only trusted devices (verified by only strongly authenticated users) can ever even see (much less access) applications. Cost and complexity are reduced while end users enjoy seamless (but highly secure) authorized system access. The combination of unmatched security, ease of installation and usability (at lower cost than solutions from larger and more established vendors) helped earn PrecisionAccess recognition as the industry’s most innovative access control solution at the Cyber Defense Magazine 2016 InfoSec Awards at the RSA - a cryptography and information security-related conference held annually in San Francisco, California. Vidder’s unique and new security product is used by world-leading companies such as Coca-Cola, Nokia, Staples, SGN (largest gas company in the UK) as well as several nation states. Based on our analysis of the threat environment in Ukraine, we believe Vidder PrecisionAccess is the solution best suited to protect the entire country from network-based and nation-state directed cyberattacks. Equally significant, Ukraine is also ideally positioned to adopt this new generation technology and become a world leader in security. Vidder and Ukraine Cybersecurity are prepared to prove that PrecisionAccess is an ideal solution for Ukraine by organizing a public and transparent hackathon in cooperation with the Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute. We welcome the Government of Ukraine, its’ intelligence services and armed force to not only participate in both planning the hackathon as well as testing the strength of the PrecisionAccess solution by explicitly attempting to breach it. Vidder is confident the result will be favorable; because, this will be the sixth hackathon proving Vidder’s technology via exhaustive public testing. Over the course of the first five hackathons, Vidder successfully protected against over 15 billion attempted attacks from 104 countries. Vidder’s track-record securing critical systems and valuable or sensitive information in the real world for its clients is unparalleled. See here for results of hackathon #4 where “CSA, The World’s Leading Cloud Organization Collaborated with Verizon and Vidder To Validate Security and Feasibility of High Availability Public Cloud Architecture at Fourth Annual CSA Hackathon at the RSA Conference 2016”: Cloud Security Alliance Releases Results of Software-Defined Perimeter Hackathon https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/media/news/cloud-security-alliance-releases-results-of-software-defined-perimeter-hackathon/ Vidder and Ukrainen Cybersecurity are ready, today, to help Ukraine can leapfrog a generation of outdated tools and become a leader among nations in cyberdefense - by substantially neutralizing the threat to security, stability and prosperity posed by cyberattacks, including nation state sponsored cyberattacks.

"NBU warns banks of external hacker attack using unknown virus"

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"Ukraine to send trade mission to China in November"

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26 June, 2017

"Ukreximbank raising $150 mln loan from World Bank to support Ukraine’s export-oriented SMEs"

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"Ukrainian president discusses cooperation in renewable energy, Nord Stream 2 threats with French PM"

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24 June, 2017

"USAID program helps hundreds of Ukrainians start their business"

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"Poroshenko announces finalization of agreement with U.S. on arming Ukraine"

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23 June, 2017

"Regional Development ministry signs cooperation agreement with IFC"

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"Swedish investors hope to build one more wood processing plant in Rivne region in two years"

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22 June, 2017
DMITRIY SYKALUK DLF Attorneys-at-law, Associate UGTI on Facebook Ukrainian Economy (IT industry) The economy of Ukraine depends upon several industries, playing a key role in determining the country economic indicators. These include, primarily, heavy industries (mining and metals), machinery and metal working, oil and gas production and energy industry, chemicals and pharmaceuticals, woodworking, pulp and paper industry, light industry, food processing, freight and passenger transport, and, of course, agriculture. At the same time, it should be noted that Ukraine is often associated with agriculture. And it’s really true. Ukraine holds a strong position in agriculture and is an important player in the global agricultural market. For instance, Ukraine is the world’s largest producer of sunflower oil and has a large share in the production of grain, sugar, meat and dairy products. Despite the fact that Ukraine also pays much attention to the development of space exploration and aircraft, satellites and weapons, the country has not yet become innovative. However, it is innovations that attract foreign investments to the country's economy and convey its modern image. Ukrainian IT start-ups have long been successfully working all over the world. Ukrainian IT specialists are in demand both within our country and far beyond its borders. What is Ukraine lacking to turn into a technology hub and become an innovative county? The main blame for Ukraine's inability to reach the world innovation level must lie with the unpredictable actions of the government, which does not contribute to creating an environment for the development of start-ups. IT companies are developing primarily at the expense of foreign users and customers who can offer both high paying jobs and transparent working conditions. The demand for innovative developments is very low in the Ukrainian market. In order to make use of the advantages and prospects the Ukrainian IT market has to offer, foreign companies hire Ukrainian software developers as freelancers or, at best, found subsidiaries in Ukraine, engaged in developing individual IT components for parent companies. The final assembly of the product is carried out by the client abroad. Lack of appropriate microclimate and state support, low economic performance and places in international rankings and political instability lead to entrepreneurs tending to establish foreign offices, rather than develop their business in Ukraine. The unfriendly attitude of law enforcement agencies towards domestic IT companies has become notorious and further distorts the image of Ukraine. It should be noted, however, that the situation is improving. The government is beginning to realize the importance of the IT industry for the state and the need to increase domestic demand for innovation. More and more foreign companies are considering developments and start-ups created by Ukrainian IT specialists as an investment. By using Ukraine’s potential in space and aircraft construction, high level of technical education and a large number of IT specialists, Ukraine may in the near future become more attractive for foreign investors who will happily invest in Ukrainian start-ups and inventions This forms another important branch of the economy, which, along with agriculture, can become the engine of the Ukrainian economic miracle.

"Pentagon says plans to arm Ukraine evaluated on case-by-case basis"

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"Ave umwelt Ukraine seeks to start building waste recycling complex in Zakarpattia region in 2018"

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21 June, 2017

"Electric cars market in Ukraine expands by 2.8 times in five months"

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"Cost of investment projects in Ukrainian agriculture totals some UAH 37 bln in Q1 2017"

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20 June, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine origins, spirit of its people and country geographic location is vital to the world in the 21st century Ukraine is the largest European country where the geographical center of the European continent is located. Its favorable geopolitical location between Western Europe and Asia has always played an important role in the world history. The country rich with natural resources always was a dream of all the aggressors of the Old World, starting from the Greeks and Romans, Huns and Celts and Goths, Mongols and Scandinavians, Germans and Muscovites, who in the 17th and 18th centuries appropriated the ancient history of Kiev Rus and even its name. Historical events are characterized by the pattern that any empire with Rus-Ukraine could not hold this country for a long time, and soon after its capture, the state collapsed and disappeared from the political map of the world. This situation has happened with the empire of Alexander the Great, then with the Great Mongol Empire of Chingiz, with the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Rzeczpospolita, the Ottoman Empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the French Empire, the German Empire, the Russian Empire, the Third Reich and with the Soviet Union. In addition to all the other minor reasons of the failure in Ukraine colonization, the main two are objective and subjective. The objective reason is the constant rivalry of all new superpowers with the old ones for territory of Ukraine, and the subjective reason is conditioned by the freedom-loving spirit of the Ukrainians to preserve their national identity, reject any attempt of assimilation, the desire for independence and the rejection of the colonial authorities. Almost every generation of Ukrainians had to fight to defend their lands but never Ukrainians were aggressors. Therefore, Ukrainian society, where every man had military experience, was not mentally militarized; military service was always perceived as a merely forced, imposed from the outside. Ukrainian families always encouraged and supported the youth's desire for science and art; the main parental mission was to give children the best education. In the peaceful periods of life, between the devastating wars, despite the many millions lives lost of the able-bodied population, the industry of Ukraine has been rapidly developing in all sectors of the economy. It was Ukraine, among other Soviet republics that played the most important role in the economic growth of the Soviet Union. Without the participation of Ukraine in the Union, it was impossible to create metallurgy, energy, aviation and space engineering, machine building, shipbuilding, military industry, and to develop oil and gas fields in Siberia in just a few decades. Dozens of advanced universities were established in Ukraine, hundreds of powerful research centers, thousands of design bureaus and tens of thousands of innovative enterprises, which were the locomotives for the creation and development of the economy of the entire Soviet Union. According to Ukrainian projects, the largest factories were built in many countries of the "socialist camp" all over the world. All Warsaw Treaty countries and their allies were armed with Ukrainian ammunition. After Ukraine withdrew from the Soviet Union after its collapse, unlike Russian Federation, Ukraine launched an irreversible processes of democratization and the establishment of civil society institutions with much more success. In 1994, in exchange for guarantees of sovereignty on the part of all nuclear powers, Ukraine became the first state in the world to voluntarily abandon its third largest nuclear arsenal. Since the days of the second President Leonid Kuchma, in Ukraine, as in Russia, there has been a process of oligarchization of the economy, when several oligarchs close to the power have privatized industrial state assets and established a self-controlled system of power. Despite this, unlike in Russia, the Ukrainian decentralized civil society has evolved and strengthened so much that it is capable at times of assault on democratic rights of people not only to organize themselves to oppose the state system of power, but also completely replace it. This has already been done twice, in 2005 as a result of the Orange Revolution, in the falsification of the results of the presidential elections and in 2014 as a result of the Dignity Revolution after the rejection of the geopolitical policy of European integration in favor of rapprochement with Russia. A characteristic feature of both revolutions was their political and not economic character, which attests to the high level of consciousness of the masses, for which their political freedom is higher than the material state. Moreover, the power of Ukrainian civil society is so great that it can repel even the military aggression of a stronger enemy, which was a big surprise for the Kremlin in 2014 after the overthrow of Yanukovych pro-Russian regime. During his presidential reign, fulfilling the tasks of Moscow, he completely destroyed the state security system of Ukraine and destroyed the fighting efficiency of country’s army. After Yanukovych fled to Russia, Kremlin began to implement the carefully planned strategic implementation of the annexation of at least 60% of the Ukrainian territories under the conditional name "Novorossia", but suddenly faced a massive spontaneous selfless resistance of ordinary citizens willing to sacrifice their means, health and life for the ideals of freedom and independence. Hundreds of thousands of volunteers, at their own expense, organized an armed resistance to the professional units of the Russian special forces and the army, destroying the implementation of this plan by 90%, except for the Crimea and parts of the Donetsk and Lugansk regions. Only the indecisiveness, at the time, of Kyiv government and the direct intervention of the Russian army prevented the voluntary movement from liberating the entire territory of Ukraine from the invaders. Due to the huge corruption influence of both Ukrainian and Russian oligarchs of all branches, basic demands of both revolutions to state government on the cardinal transformations of the country had not yet been fulfilled. So far, revolutions in Ukraine have led only to the rotation of political forces controlled by the oligarchs and under the cover of carrying out pseudo-reforms to redistribution of their spheres of influence in the economy. The oligarchic system still functions but it is on its last legs Containment of the economic potential of Ukraine is due not to objective, but only to artificial, subjective reasons for preventing oligarchic clans from developing a free market and competition, equal access of small, medium and foreign businesses to capital and natural resources, all resistance to the creation by domestic and foreign investors of new competitive financial and industrial assets. This deterrence is realized by the action of lobbying laws and by-laws, inefficient government's activity, by bribable decisions of courts and law enforcement agencies. As a result, all standards of living of the population are falling, national gross income per capita is constantly decreasing, and the incomes of oligarchs, politicians and officials serving them are growing. Despite this, Ukrainian people has proved to the world community that unlike their neighbors in Russia, Belarus and Turkey, do not accept corruption and authoritarianism, and are able to defend their rights and the desire for democratic development, even with weapons help. The significant drop in the living standards and growing dissatisfaction with domestic state policy, the extremely low percentage of people's trust in all government agancies and the great desire for change showed that in the short term, the development of civil society in Ukraine will inevitably lead to dramatic changes in its imperfect political system and, if not they will significantly limit the influence of oligarchs on power in the country. This will lead to deregulation and liberalization of the national economy, which again will lead Ukraine to rapid economic development. There are no objective reasons for not revealing the huge economic potential of Ukraine - favorable climatic conditions, fertile soils, rich natural resources, developed science, industry, transport infrastructure, highly educated population. As a result of studies carried out by various expert organizations, the national wealth of Ukraine is estimated at $ 14 trillion: Mineral resources - $ 10.5 trillion; State assets - $ 2.5 trillion; Intellectual property - 1 trillion $. Currently, the nominal gross domestic product (GDP) of Ukraine is about $ 80 billion. In addition, 70% of official GDP is in the shadow economy. Further 30% of GDP annually settles in offshore zones in hidden profits form from export deals. Therefore, only at the expense of liberalization of the tax policy it is possible to double the country's GDP. A detailed study of certain sectors of the Ukrainian economy allows us to see the amazing potential for economic growth. So, with the necessary investment in the shortest time, it is possible to increase production on the basis of already existing enterprises: in the automotive industry - in 5 times; In shipbuilding - in 5 times; In power engineering - in 5 times; In the agricultural sector - in 10 times; In the military-industrial complex - in 10 times; In the IT industry - in 15 times; In the aircraft industry in - 20 times. Therefore, the majority of representatives of civil society, Ukrainian economists and opposition politicians perceive the government's forecasts on the rate of economic growth at the level of 2-3% per year, as a ridiculous. It is a proof of that political elite of Ukraine is in the pocket of oligarchs, are professional incompetent and complete inadequacy of objective opportunities and social needs in the rates of annual growth, calculated in double digits. Bearing in mind the large scale of the required investments, the availability of cheap and skilled labor, raw materials, the developed transport infrastructure and an advantageous location in the center of the intersection of many trade routes, Ukraine is a new target of investment and relocation of production for many countries. Gradually, Ukraine welcomes Chinese and Middle Eastern investors. The size of Chinese investments in Ukraine is already estimated at billions of dollars. However, American investments are of special interest to Ukraine. Ukraine, having emerged from under the merciless protection of Russia, on the path of democratic development, has become its enemy. Neither China, nor the European Union, have real opportunities to weaken Russia's pressure on Ukraine. The United States is the guarantor of Ukraine's integrity and inviolability of its borders in accordance with the Budapest Memorandum of 1994 after Ukraine gave up nuclear weapons. The US consistently supports Ukraine in the conflict with Russia, in confronting democracy with authoritarianism. The US can implement a new "Marshall's Plan" in Ukraine, revealing not only it, but also its economic potential. The US can turn Ukraine into a powerful regional leader, a new global technology center. The US can create a springboard in Ukraine for its influence not only on Russia and Turkey, but also on Europe.

"Ukraine’s An-132d built for Saudi Arabia successfully debuts at Paris air show"

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"Promoting Sustainable, Inclusive Economic Recovery is Focus of New World Bank Group Strategy for Ukraine"

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19 June, 2017

"Ukraine leader Poroshenko will meet Trump on Tuesday"

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"Canadian divisions of retail giants want to sell goods from Ukraine"

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17 June, 2017

"Ukraine enters list of world's 50 most innovative countries"

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"A new engine for the growth of the Ukrainian economy"

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16 June, 2017

"Conference on reforms in Ukraine will be held in London"

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"Volume of investments into Ukrainian agrarian sector grew by 50%"

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15 June, 2017

"Ukrainian exports to Sweden increased by 34% – ambassador"

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"Ukraine's finance ministry could enter foreign capital market after receiving new tranche from IMF"

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14 June, 2017

"Canadian divisions of Global Retailers got interested in selling Ukrainian goods

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"New transport An-132D built in Ukraine under order of Saudi Arabia to debut at Le Bourget 2017"

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13 June, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook THE GLOBAL CYBERSECURITY SUMMIT The Global Cybersecurity Summit begins tomorrow (June 14) in Kyiv. https://gcs17.com/ As many of our partners in the US and Ukraine as well as readers appreciate, Ukraine now faces significant network-based cyberattacks to its’ private as well as public IT infrastructures. The country is extremely vulnerable to directed cyberattacks that target the power grid as well as both businesses and government institutions. It must deploy more effective counter-measures to stop network attacks. Unless corrective action is taken, the scale and damage inflicted by such attacks will only increase. Vidder, Inc. and UGTI, through its subsidiary Ukraine Cybersecurity, LLC is a subsidiary of Ukraine Global Trade and Investor, Inc. (“UGTI”), are finalizing a press release on a hackathon we are jointly planning to prove that PrecisionAccess is an ideal solution for Ukraine. Details of the hackathon will be released on the second day (June 15) of the Global Cybersecurity Summit. Stay tuned! With questions or comments please contact me at aleks.m@ukrainegti.com

"Construction of solar power plant in Chornobyl zone to start soon"

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"Over 2,900 Ukrainians Enter Eu without visas in three days – State Border Service"

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12 June, 2017

"IFC to raise $250 mln for projects in Ukraine in 2017 - director for Belarus and Ukraine"

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"Canada's Earth Alive enters Ukrainian market with organic fertilizer"

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10 June, 2017

"National Bank of Ukraine: Billions are circulating outside of the banking system in Ukraine"

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"Kyiv created a commission to promote Ukraine"

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"NBU makes it easier for businesses to invest abroad"

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9 June, 2017

"TIU CANADA TO BREAK GROUND ON SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT IN NIKOPOL"

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"EKOL UKRAINE STARTS SHIPPING TO IRAN"

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8 June, 2017

"Ukraine, Czechia agree to develop cooperation in energy, industryс"

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"RFE/RL: White House says Russia sanctions to remain until Ukraine crisis resolved"

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7 June, 2017

"Car market in Ukraine 33% up in five months"

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"A Better Skilled Workforce is Essential to Boosting Ukraine’s Economy"

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6 June, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Letter from UGTI founder To write my May 23, 2017 post I drew on predominantly positive lessons from my experience of innovation, tech transfer and patent law in the United States. Because the United States is the largest and most innovative knowledge economy in the world, it is safe to conclude that the State and Federal government in the US fostered and maintains an environment highly conducive to innovation and commercialization of that innovation. As such, the United States offers an abundance of best practices which Ukraine would be wise to follow. That said, to achieve its objective of developing into a knowledge economy Ukraine must also learn from policy missteps in the United States. Recently my colleague Matthew J. Dowd co-authored an article with Hon. Paul R. Michel titled "The Need for 'Innovation Certainty' at the Crossroads of Patent and Antitrust Law" that highlights what I would characterize as innovation policy missteps in the United States. The article was published in the April 2017 issue of the CPI Antitrust Chronicle and UGTI is grateful to CPI for providing permission for me to share the article with our readers. For more great CPI content, visit: CPI - https://www.competitionpolicyinternational.com/ This week my post draws two lessons from the article by Matthew J. Dowd and Hon. Paul R. Michel. Mr. Dowd is founder of Dowd PLLC in Washington, DC where his practice focuses on patent and intellectual property issues. A skilled appellate and trial litigator, Mr. Dowd represented Nobel Laureate James Watson, co-discoverer of the DNA double helix, as amicus curiae in the groundbreaking 2013 Supreme Court gene patent case. Hon. Paul. R. Michel is Former Chief Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and rightly hailed as icon of intellectual property law in the United States. For readers unfamiliar with the US judicial system, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit is headquartered in Washington, DC and it is the only appellate level court in the United States with the jurisdiction to hear patent cases. Federal Circuit - http://www.cafc.uscourts.gov/ Dowd PLLC - http://www.dowdpllc.com/experience.html. Hon. Paul R. Michel - http://fordhamipconference.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Michel-P.pdf. "Innovation Certainty" speaks to those factors that impact the degree of risk inherent to an innovation, investment and commercialization environment. Needless to say, Ukraine has significant legal, regulatory and political risk factors. The need to improve these, and concrete recommendations for improving them, are the subject of considerable political debate and scholarly analysis. Many of the solutions (such as judicial sector reform) are well understood, even if imperfectly executed. "The Need for 'Innovation Certainty' at the Crossroads of Patent and Antitrust Law" As noted on page 4 of the "The Need for 'Innovation Certainty' at the Crossroads of Patent and Antitrust Law,” massive innovation uncertainty has taken hold in the US in the aftermath of multiple Supreme Court decisions that decreased the strength and value of patents, implementation of administrative proceedings that made it easier to challenge and invalidate patents and challenges by the Federal Trade Commission to the practice of patent licensing. From these missteps Ukraine should learn two critical lessons. First, to develop a knowledge economy one must create a system that treats patent rights as property right and rewards innovation for society’s sake. Second, the tail must not wag the dog, by which I mean large, deep-pocketed companies that grew in size and value because of the innovations they brought to the market are products of a system rewarded innovation, not the other way around. This second lesson is particularly important for Ukraine because large Ukrainian companies and startups alike will for the foreseeable future be at a significant financial and experience disadvantage vis-à-vis western partners. While Ukraine must create an environment that encourages such partners to enter the Ukrainian market and leverage its human resource talent in science and technology it must also take policy steps necessary to avoid becoming a banana republic for innovation by the US and Western Europe. Specifically, Ukraine’s homegrown talent must be able to rely on a domestic patent system that can provide them with the space and security needed to protect their innovations and grow their companies. "The Need for 'Innovation Certainty' at the Crossroads of Patent and Antitrust Law" READ: https://gallery.mailchimp.com/fc2ded176309d46ef7deb2bac/files/eaad2845-59ce-42a0-a466-1e7daa5ac337/The_Need_for_Innovation_Certainty_at_the_Crossroads_of_Patent_and_Antitrust_Law.pdf

"U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP CONGRATULATES THE AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN UKRAINE ON ITS 25TH ANNIVERSARY"

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"World Bank improves forecast for Ukraine's economic growth in 2018"

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5 June, 2017

"EU's Council agrees its stance on trade measures for Ukraine"

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"Ukraine, Thailand sign trade pact, legal assistance agreement"

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3 June, 2017

"Ukrainian economy lost 20.4% of GDP due to war in Donbas last year"

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"Waszczykowski: Ukraine should be on agenda of UN Security Council"

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2 June, 2017

"Investments in agricultural sector grow by more than half – expert"

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"Canada completes ratification of FTA with Ukraine"

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1 June, 2017
ANATOLIY DOROVSKIKH Director of Scientific and Production Association “International Medical Center”, Professor UGTI on Facebook Integrative medicine with SmartMed Despite all economic difficulties Ukrainian doctors continue to introduce new technologies that are in demand all over the world. At a regular annual congress of cardiac surgeons in London, our surgeons introduced a new type of heart valve, which had been invented during the operation. The struggle for the life of a small patient was limited to minutes and it was necessary to create a know-how from improvised materials. This is impossibility to achieve any result using normal methods, to cope with the illness with standard protocols of treatment which allows Ukrainian experts to find innovations in all spheres of medicine. It's no secret that patients with chronic diseases are prescribed a list of medications, many of which do not combine with each other and cause at best allergic reactions. And even those drugs that are designed to strengthen the immune system, often destroy it. The specialists of the International Medical Center together with scientists have found a way to reduce the intake of drugs to minimum, while increasing their effectiveness. The secret is in nanosilicon 2HM (nanosilica), which is 100% absorbed due to biologically active state. What does it give? Studies conducted in the institutes of microbiology and physiology of the Academy of Sciences of Ukraine showed: the use of nanosilica drugs can reduce the inflammatory factor - the level of interlikins (enzymes responsible for inflammation) - 10-12 times on the first day! In this case, it is possible to increase oxygen saturation of cells 2.5 times greater, and also to decrease the activity of adenoviruses up to 3000 times within an hour! Such an efficiency is easily explained: when using nanosilica, a fast recovery of the organism takes place due to complete assimilation of the necessary trace elements. And there are more than 70 of them - phosphorus, calcium, zinc, selenium, fluorine, chlorine, sodium, molybdenum, cobalt, aluminum and many others ... Silicon also participates in the formation of vitamin D, normalizes metabolism, slows down the aging process and is the catalyst for many redox reactions. But this is normal. As a rule there is not enough silicon in the body, and the problem of its replenishment is relevant in countries all over the world. We have managed to find the solution only due to synergy of science, traditional and non-traditional methods of diagnostics, treatment and prevention, what our clinic network of integrative medicine "SmartMed" is based on. These innovative medical institutions put into practice scientific developments of gastroenterologists, phytotherapeutists and physicists. All methods are non-invasive (not damaging skin), patented and approved for usage by the Ministry of Health of Ukraine. They have international certification and are successfully used by our visiting teams of doctors in Turkey, Germany, OAU, Azerbaijan, Poland, the Czech Republic, etc. When started fifteen years ago an integrative medicine was called the medicine of the future - now this is our reality. Thanks to it, our patients cope with such severe chronic diseases as metabolic syndrome (obesity), hepatitis B and C, diseases of the cardiovascular system and gastric tract, oncology, various allergic conditions, prostatitis, psoriasis, severe anemia, neuroses and peptic ulcer, problems of suxual potency of men, infertility, mastopathy and fibroids of women and a number of others ... Earlier most of these diagnoses were considered incurable. Since ancient times doctors have noticed, you can cope with severe diagnoses only when you treat the body as a whole. And when all efforts are directed at eliminating symptoms and consequences, the result will be short-lived. It is important to identify a connection, for example, between knee pain resulting from exercise and chlamydia, which is the true cause of the disease. Otherwise, you can heal the knee for years, and wonder why the pain comes back again and again. Therefore, the basis of integrative medicine is diagnostics, elucidation of the cause-effect relations of problems emergence in the human body. Due to to high-tech equipment that is available in SmartMed clinic, it is possible to detect the disease at the earliest stages and designate the most effective treatment program. The technology is simple: each macro- and microorganism has its own specific frequency spectrum (the spectrum of oscillations). The development of pathological processes leads to a change of this spectrum frequency in form of pathological (disharmonious) oscillations appearance. All patient's amplitude-frequency characteristics are analyzed during diagnosis and, in accordance with the set of frequencies, a diagnosis is made. Moreover, it is absolutely accurate, because there cause-effect relationships of problems and malfunctions in body are revealed. In any body! So that not only person but also pets, animals can be tested. The technique is so effective that it allows to assess the general state of an organism, to conduct an in-depth analysis of every cell in the human body and to reveal the disease in its embryo in just a few hours. In traditional hospitals it takes weeks of laboratory research. The frequency-resonance method is also good because it allows not only diagnosing but also successful treating. Due to correct frequency of exposure, tissues and organs can be transferred to a normal state, eliminating the signs of acquired diseases, destroying fungi, viruses, bacteria, helminthes, and removing the formed toxins. Taking into account the system of meridians - covering the whole organism as a whole - all the organs and systems are treated during the therapy. At the disposal of "SmartMed" clinic specialists there are also herbal preparations, the dosage of which is selected individually. The combination of prescribed medicines and their digestibility by the body are also individually tested. For the most effective treatment of patients, SmartMed has developed unique programs that, along with frequency-resonance techniques, use kinesiological rehabilitation and psychological support. When the first one helps restore flexibility of the joints and spine, relieve pain, restore nutrition in the affected tissues, improve the elasticity of muscles, tendons and ligaments, then in the second case - professional psychotherapists make the final correction to the patients' minds, helping them to feel their bodies harmony and health.

"France’s Egis could build incineration plant for Lviv"

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"Japanese business to invest in Ukraine, hopes for cooperation under win-win formula"

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31 May, 2017

"UKRAINE RANKS 56TH IN GLOBAL INNOVATION INDEX BUT HAS GREATER POTENTIAL – GROYSMAN"

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30 May, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine want money, Ukraine needs money but….. There are plenty of capital in the world seeking investment opportunities. Capital is looking to have above market returns with below market risks. It is that simple. Obviously Ukraine’s country risk is very high. War on the East of the country, poor rule of law, corruption at every point, bad protection for investors, bureaucracy and so on. Alternative energy is just one small example. Ukraine’s green tariff got great deal of interest from all corners of the world. But only geniuses in Ukraine’s parliament can come up with guarantee that developer of alternative energy project will be able to sell to national grid and get a green tariff rates after everything is built not before like everywhere in the world. Therefore, investor must put up all of the capital, go through all of the construction and then be at the mercy of Ukrainian bureaucrats that are looking for a bribe. So, why enact such an aggressive and attractive investment opportunity and then effectively kill it? (no professional investor will ever put up money with such conditions.) And if it was a simple oversight why not fix it? The answer is very simple. In its current form law benefits only insiders. This is a good example why great opportunities in Ukraine go to waste and wealth in Ukraine continues to accumulate in a very limited circles. Let’s, dream for a moment. Let’s assume that all of the issues I described in above paragraph are gone. Is Ukraine’s business ready to take on professional investors? In my 20 years’ experience working and investing in Ukraine I worked with many companies and business owners. In the last 2 years this was my only focus. My conclusion is that over 90% business of all sizes are not ready for a professional capital. 1.Business of ANY size must have a VISION. 2.Majority of organizations are not internally structured for rapid growth investors expect after investment is made. If investor puts in a $1, investors wants it to go to work immediately. 3.Prior to seeking investors capital business must have a strategy that makes sense in the current environment and not the strategy that will work in a future or developed world. Management must address all risks. It is rarely done. 4.Western investor must see management team that is not filled with relatives but with professionals (of course some family owned business have top notch professionals who are members of the family). 5.Management must present investors with alternative scenarios in case the best laid out plans do not work out. 6.Management must have cash flow models with multiple financial instruments it can use to appease and reduce risk for investor. 7.Business model must be scalable and have EXIT strategy. 8.Investors always want to see use of proceeds, specific milestones and detail progress reports. 9.Financial model must be based on realistic assumptions that can be easily adjusted to play out different outcomes and compiled in the way that easy to understand (investor has no time to figure it out). 10. Management must address sales. It must demonstrate to investor that whatever service or product company produces can be sold. It must have sales and marketing strategy that is consistent with the vision and company’s operations capable of delivering it. Of course I can go on but my list of top 10 is a good start. Companies in Ukraine, of all types and sizes, must start working on it today. It will produce two results: 1) Companies will make more money 2) Companies will become attractive to investors Owners and management can only control what they can do. Transformation must start by doing things each company can control. There is no question Ukraine represents opportunity to earn outsized returns across many industries. So, the focus must be to reduce risks. Let’s start by reducing operational risks of the business, while top political echelons workout issues on the global level.

"Netherlands ratifies EU-Ukraine treaty"

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"IKEA interested in Ukrainian market"

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29 May, 2017

"Number of supporters of Ukraine’s membership in EU grows after Eurovision 2017"

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"NATO may open its tenders to Ukraine"

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27 May, 2017

"Stoltenberg says NATO allies confirm support of Ukraine"

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"Fighting corruption, Ukraine starts to judge its judges"

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26 May, 2017

"South Korea plans to invest in 4G and 5G development in Ukraine"

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"Trump administration earmarks more than $350 mln for Ukraine for 2018 FY"

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25 May, 2017
DAVID SANTULLI Founder & President, United Planet Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Bridges – Good for Business, Good for World What does the world need more of? Many UGTI supporters would say business. And yes, that is true! But what comes even before business? Before products? Before services? Relationships. Partnerships. Without relationships, there is no business. There is no framework for trust. There is no foundation from which to grow. That is the beauty of UGTI. It provides this foundation and this platform. And in a world that increasingly appears as if it is trying to tear itself apart that is also the goal of United Planet. United Planet, one of the allies within UGTI, is an international nonprofit with a mission to build global community, one relationship at a time. Whether conducting business between Ukraine and USA or Japan and Jordan, our potential for success is rooted in the depth of our relationships. The longevity of our business is only as strong as our relationships. After having founded and led and international trading company in Tokyo, Japan for a decade, United Planet’s founder, David Santulli, returned to the USA within a conviction that fulfilling our global potential in any field—whether in business or education, health, agriculture, or robotics—depended upon mutually supportive, respectful, and understanding relationships. Since 2001, United Planet has cultivated hundreds of thousand of cross-border relationships, engaged leaders and volunteers from more than 50 countries in international service, internships, partnerships, dialogue, leadership development, intercultural learning, and more. Universities and Fortune 500 companies alike have joined United Planet in this global mission. What are the possibilities for Ukraine? Here are just a few: 1.Opportunities for skilled and unskilled interns and volunteers to work in the USA and in over 25 other countries. 2.Opportunities to access elite training for Ukrainian universities and corporations in leadership development, entrepreneurship, intercultural communications, language acquisition, and more. 3.Opportunities to develop curricula in schools and universities, as well as corporations, in global competency to make Ukrainians more competitive in a global economy. 4.Opportunities to address and solve pressing global issues in partnership with other universities and corporation in the USA and beyond. Imagine the potential of a world in which we could all cooperate effectively –in which everyone could benefit? Sound interesting? United Planet is just one of UGTI’s many allies that is helping to build bridges with Ukraine. And this is just the beginning.

"Ukraine, China discuss plans for holding joint business forum in 2017 "

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24 May, 2017

"First aircraft engine assembled in China using Motor Sich technology could be shown by late 2017"

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"Ukraine's forex reserves grow to $17.6 bln"

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23 May, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Letter from UGTI founder Promoting the growth of a high-technology economy requires intelligent cultivation of the interface between university research and the private sector. Universities and institutes account for both a disproportionately high percentage of early-stage research (as compared to the private sector) as well as educate and groom the next generation of innovators and technology entrepreneurs. My post this week identifies three areas critical to the development of a healthy university/institute research and industry confluence in Ukraine and makes a recommendation for improvements in each area. Priority Area #1 – Lay the Foundation for a Knowledge Economy High levels of public spending on university research are an important factor in promoting science and technology development because in the usual 3 to 5-year industrial product time frame, the private sector faces significant obstacles in cost-effectively developing competitive products based on nascent technology. By contrast, governments are in a unique position to invest large sums of capital without expecting or requiring an immediate and direct return on their investment. Once the new technology proliferates, the governments’ and the nations’ payoff comes in the form of new jobs, new wealth and a society improved through technological innovation. Fortunately, funding of research and development of high-technologies is not an exclusively government function. Private investors, independent researchers, corporate budgets and well-staffed corporate labs have long-since contributed to the invention and commercial proliferation of new technologies. Despite the relative absence of domestic funding for Ukrainian scientists, Ukraine is in many respects well-position to secure funding from foreign sources. However, establishing large corporate research centers in Ukraine requires a significant commitment of time and capital. In the short-term, a more feasible scenario involves utilizing foreign private equity to finance innovation at Ukrainian universities and institutes and forging joint ventures between western companies and Ukrainian talent in science and technology as well as capacity in manufacturing. With its population of highly trained scientists and the ability to offer comparative cost advantages that would help western companies compete on cost with those in Asia Ukraine should prove an inviting destination. From the Ukrainian perspective, an influx of foreign direct investment directed toward contracted research and development and manufacturing would offset the Ukrainian government’s inability to sufficiently fund scientific research and lay the foundation for a full-cycle knowledge economy in Ukraine. Ukraine’s commitment to enact legal, economic and political reform since the Maidan Revolution has improved the conditions for foreign direct investment in Ukrainian science and technology but there remains a long way to go. Often overlooked when discussing the need to increase investment is the critical importance of reforming intellectual property laws and increasing domestic respect of compliance with those laws. *Recommendation #1 – Continue Intellectual Property Law Reform and Education Intellectual property rights are the lifeblood of any high-technology venture because they protect initial and often substantial investment in research and development by providing legal protection from unauthorized use by competitors. Beyond protecting initial investments of time and capital, a strong patent also enables the patent holder to profit from an innovation through licensing agreements or by commercializing the invention. As such, the potential for the Ukrainian science and technology community to secure financial support in the form of foreign direct investment is tied to the willingness of Ukraine’s government to improve patent protection and enforcement mechanisms and also the ability of universities, research institutes and commercial entities to educate the students and staff on the importance of securing intellectual property protection for their inventions and respecting the intellectual property rights of others. Priority Area #2 – Protect the University / Institute Researcher’s Ability to Innovate While providing a strong system of patent protection and enforcement must be a priority for the Ukrainian legislature there are limits to the extent of protection that should be afforded. Until recently, the long-settled experimental use exception protected the ability of university researchers in the United States to study and experiment on patented inventions or processes without violating the rights of the patent holder. The experimental use exception grew out of an opinion by United States Supreme Court Justice Story in the case of Whittemore v. Cutter. Justice Story believed that, “it could never have been the intention of the legislature to punish a man who constructed such a machine merely for philosophical experiments, or for the purpose of ascertaining the sufficiency of the machine to produce its described effects.” Historically, “ascertaining the sufficiency” of inventions has largely been the province of university researchers, whose role it has been to “understand and tinker with the very latest and now often patent-protected technology to develop yet further new developments.” effectively eliminates the exception and threatens to disrupt the flow of technology from university labs to commercial markets. Madey v. DukeThe United States Federal Circuit Court decision in The controversy in Madey began with a dispute between Duke University and the former director of its free-electron laser laboratory, John Madey. When Madey, who owns two critical patents relating to the free-electron laser, resigned from Duke, he sued the University to prevent continued use of his patents. At trial, the Court determined that the experimental use exception did not apply because Duke University’s continued use of the laser furthered the University’s business objective to educate and enlighten students and faculty. This narrowing of the experimental use exception in the US stands in contrast to the approach taken by countries such as Japan and Germany that statutorily protect its equivalents. From the perspective of Ukraine, it could also represent an opportunity to create a research and development environment in which US researchers and companies could leverage Ukraine’s strength in science and technology and relatively low-cost R&D to experiment under the protection of an experimental use exception and advance the state of the art. *Recommendation #2 – Codify an Equivalent of the Experimental Use Exception By codifying an equivalent of the experimental use exception Ukraine stands to benefit in two discrete ways. First, funding scientific research and development in Ukraine would become particularly appealing to U.S. companies, researchers and investors in that it would provide them with a means to circumvent the restrictive Madey rule. Second, Ukraine is likely to further its hopes of achieving European integration by creating an intellectual property law scheme that conforms to European practice by recognizing the experimental use exception. Priority Area #3 – Encourage Academic Technology Transfer For its ability to coordinate activity at the crossroads between government funding, university research and the private sector, The Economist has called the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980, “the most inspired piece of legislation enacted in America over the past half-century.” The Act codifies what is known as academic technology transfer. The process of academic technology transfer as a formal concept originated in a report entitled ‘Science - The Endless Frontier’ written by Vannevar Bush for the President of the United States in 1945. At the time, “the success of the Manhattan Project had demonstrated the importance of university research to the national defense” which hinted at “the value of university research as a vehicle for enhancing the economy by increasing the flow of knowledge to industry through support of basic science.” However, technology transfer from universities to industry was only made practicable 35 years after Mr. Bush’s report, with the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980. Before Bayh-Dole, “although taxpayers were footing the bill for 60% of all academic research, they were getting hardly anything in return”[6] because “the fruits of research supported by government agencies had belonged strictly to the federal government.” This created a situation in which the federal government held patents on 28,000 technologies, but fewer than 5% of these were ever developed into commercial products. The private sector was unable to commercialize products based on these patents because “nobody could exploit such research without tedious negotiations with the federal agencies concerned.” Companies also found it nearly impossible to acquire exclusive rights to a government-owned patent. Without the protection provided by exclusive rights to a given patent, “few firms were willing to invest millions more of their own money to turn a raw research idea into a marketable product. The Bayh-Dole Act of 1980 freed the backlog of once federally controlled patents by empowering universities to commercialize their government funded research through licensing agreements with the private sector. The Act gave the private sector access to once federally controlled patents by transferring “ownership of an invention or discovery from the government agency that had helped to pay for it to the academic institution that had carried out the research.” This allowed universities to offer third parties exclusive licensing agreements for the commercialization of technologies whose discovery was facilitated by government funding. In adopting the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980, legislators hoped that “stimulation of the U.S. economy would occur through the licensing of new inventions from universities to businesses that would, in turn, manufacture the resulting products in the U.S.” Hindsight has proven this to be a sound public policy decision. *Recommendation #3 – Codify an Equivalent of the Bayh-Dole Act Considering Ukraine’s long-term aspirations and potential to become a Knowledge Economy capable of providing public support for science and technology initiatives the government should act at present to create a mechanism for transferring technology developed at Ukrainian universities and Institutes to the commercial marketplace. The Bayh-Dole Act in the United States is a blueprint for this effort.

"Rada approves Ukrainian language TV quotas"

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"Ukraine, Philippines negotiating expansion of military and technical cooperation"

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22 May, 2017

"Government approves bill to set zero imports duty on fertilizers"

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"Ukraine's coffers save almost $1 bln using ProZorro"

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20 May, 2017

"Germany expects U.S. mediation in settlement of Donbas crisis"

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"Alternative Energy is Rapidly Developing in Ukraine"

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19 May, 2017

"Senate of Canada votes for ratification of FTA with Ukraine"

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"Ukraine, Macedonia to revise provisions of FTA agreement"

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18 May, 2017
sr. Maria vid Khresta Religious Institute “Servants of the Lord and the Virgin of Matara”, Ukraine, Ivano-Frankivsk UGTI on Facebook WE NEED SO LITTLE TO BE HAPPY... When I speak of happiness, I speak of all people who give love, gift themselves to the others, their needs and receive back a hundred times more... In Ukraine we (the religious Institute “Servants of the Lord and the Virgin of Matara”) have a big opportunity to practice love towards the people who are in need. In 2002, at the beginning of our foundation in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine, we did not even planned to start a house of mercy. But God planned for us when one day a man together with a pregnant 16-year old girl knocked at the door of our convent in Ivano-Frankivsk and said: “Please, help Irina (it was her name) to give birth to her baby. She is an orphan and has no home where to go”. And we answered “Yes”. So, Irina stayed with us. In some months her friend Olga from the same state boarding house appeared with the same situation (being pregnant), knocking at our door and asking for help. And we again said “Yes”. And still in some months our neighbour, a 5-year old girl Katia, came up to us asking to stay with us as her mum was drunkard and took drugs. And Katia also stayed with us... One could continue this narrative with the most different cases of life and the most different personal stories of the people in need. So, we realized that God wanted something more from us to help these people in a better way. In 2004 with the help of one American benefactor we bought a house for the people who were in need, so called St. Nicolas House of Mercy. At that time we were nearly 70 in the House (single mothers and their children, orphans, street children, elderly women and 4 sisters who organized the house). It was like in a Ukrainian fairy tale “Rukavychka” (‘A Glove’) where there were many personages in a small place. Nevertheless we all were very happy to help the people. The first of the women in need was the mother of one of our sisters. She had been at the psychiatric hospital for about 18 years. Four children were taken from her by forth and were educated at the state orphanage having practically no contact with their mother. When one of her daughters entered the convent she started visiting her mother at the hospital taking her to our house from time to time to give her more human care (the life conditions at the hospital were terrible, almost no human). Once she took the mother back to the hospital but the doctors said that the woman was discharged. As she had no place to go and no one who could take care of her, we received her at the convent. Then we had several elderly women more, everyone with her personal story. So, we realized that we needed to increase our House of Mercy to help all the children, single mums and elderly women in a proper way. And God helped us through good people. We opened a House of Mercy for orphans, semi-orphans and street children, a House of Mercy for single mothers and children and a House of Mercy for elderly women. So, step by step the whole Mercy Town was organized. Nowadays we have 35 orphans and semi-orphans in our House of Mercy beginning from 1-year old baby up till the age of 21 (the girl who is a student) and more 12 children from our House of mercy for single mothers and their children (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vG-ZW8JN7Q- our kids dancing). At the present time we see a big necessity to help principally our children and also the children from all around with the education as the level of the state education is rather low and has an old sovietic approach. So, with the help of God we have stated the construction of our school for these kids. And on the last 8th of May we managed to consecrate the cornerstone of the school and the memory capsule. We believe that with the help of this school we would be able to educate our children, our youth to be good Christians and good citizens, good leaders of our Ukrainian nation who could think and think the Truth and lead our nation to the Good and Love. We all need so Little to be happy....and it is to love and to share this love and good with the others and this Love will be back to us a hundred times more. Aren’t we worthy of this? sr. Maria vid Khresta Dovbnya, SSVM, Ukraine, Ivano-Frankivsk contact: e-mail: sec.provucraina@servidoras.org www.servidoras.org / www.lastivky.org tel. 0038-0978568044 (ukr. mobile)/whattsup/viber 0039-3667128475

"Ukraine, Croatia agreement on economic cooperation to help fully implement free trade regime - Economic Development Ministry"

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"Government approves bill to set zero imports duty on fertilizers"

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17 May, 2017

"Chinese corporations want to build solar power plants in Ukraine"

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"China's Sany interested in participating in modernization of Ukrainian coal companies"

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16 May, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine IT – can the country do it again? Ukraine IT outsourcing industry continues to evolve and establishing new heights. Since independence IT is the only industry in Ukraine that reached world class level. Almost monthly we are hearing about opening of new IT co-working space in cities across Ukraine. Regularly media reports BIG funding rounds for Ukrainian IT start ups. More and more academic institutions in the country are getting involved by building support systems for innovation and commercialization of innovation. All Ukrainians should be proud of country’s IT industry. It is an only in INDUSTRY that is TRUSTED by the world-wide audience. The big question is: Can Ukraine do it again? And can it do it bigger? My opinion is major YES and YES. Most of last year UGTI team around the world spend time identifying one thing that simultaneously achieve the following: 1.Provide sustainable thrust for Ukrainian economy 2.Industry in which advantage can be sustainable for the next 30 to 50 years 3.Accelerates economic growth across wide range of industries 4.Scalable throughout the country geographically and demographically 5.Allow Ukraine to build country’s BRAND on it Consortium of 20 scientific fields of 21st century, as we call them, represents an opportunity for Ukraine to achieve all 5 objectives outlined above. Today Ukraine is in unique position in the scientific fields listed in the image below. It can become a global leader in each. But the crown jewel will be if Ukraine can be known as a country that made all of them work together horizontally across industries and vertically within each industry. In other words, experts in AI field can easily collaborate, experiment or develop with experts in Agrotech. At the same time start up in Nano technology is able to collaborate within its area of expertise with companies that have greater deal of experience and resources in the same industry. I will leave to the reader’s imagination economic impact of such success.

"China ready to participate in building nuclear fuel production facilities in Ukraine – Energy Ministry"

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"Antonov aircraft office could be established in Malta – President"

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15 May, 2017

"Ukraine, Israel to accelerate negotiations on signing FTA agreement"

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"As Russia Uses Cyberattacks, Ukraine Bans Some Social Media Sites"

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13 May, 2017

"Suspected Russia-backed hackers target Baltic energy networks"

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"Ukraine has vast experience in tackling Kremlin propaganda and ready to share it – experts"

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"VCs Put $110 Million Into Grammar-Checking Software"

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12 May, 2017

"Klimkin: I Hope we will soon be able to enter the visa-free regime with all the countries of the “white Schengen list”"

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"Ukraine gets EUR10 mln to support reform of public administration"

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11 May, 2017
VIC KORSUN Business adviser at Atlantic Group UGTI on Facebook TechProfiles TechProfiles - A Database of Technological Developments for Licensing and R&D in Ukraine and Other Countries The www.TechProfiles.org database of information was created during the period from 2006-2014 during the 8 years I worked at the Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU) through my interactions with scientists and engineers that worked on scientific projects supported by STCU. STCU is a non-profit governmental organization created to help the redirection of scientists who worked on military projects during the period of the Soviet Union to work on scientific projects geared toward peaceful, social and commercial applications. www.TechProfiles.org database is a starting point for introducing investors and western companies to scientific, engineering and technological developments of Ukraine and other countries- Azerbaijan, Georgia, Moldova, Uzbekistan. www.TechProfiles.org promotes research and development at universities and institutes to further scientific knowledge, promote economic growth and to improve quality of life. www.TechProfiles.org database contains hundreds of technology developments and innovative products that are available for licensing, investment, joint ventures and R&D contracts. The format for each of the technologies represented in the Database is based on a template that my staff and I developed during my first year at STCU. I wanted the scientists to give me an introduction to their technology, product or service in good English on a one page Technology Profile Form (TPF) with the following format because I knew that western organizations first need to be introduced to the merits of a technology before they will look at the technological details: a)Short, descriptive title b)Description of technology, product or service-1-2 paragraphs c)Advantages of the technology compared to others in the marketplace-1-2 paragraphs d)Specific applications of the technology-1-2 paragraphs e)One or 2 photographs of the device and/or graph f)Stage of development of the technology-in the laboratory, prototype, pre-production, production, sales; and patents g)Contact information-name, organization, email and telephone The information described in the TPF was intended and should therefore be general information and should not contain any secrets that would interfere with getting a patent. It is promotional, advertising information to be used for marketing purposes to attract possible investors or business partners. I used these TPF’s to promote the scientists with American, European and global companies. Each TPF is short, easy to read and provides the relevant information quickly. This TPF is similar to those used by US universities to promote their inventions on their university websites. I encouraged the Ukrainian scientists to provide their TPF in printed form or electronic form to business people they might be contacting or meeting with. I did this first in Ukraine and then expanded it to the other countries that STCU worked in, namely: Georgia, Azerbaijan, Moldova, and Uzbekistan. As a result the www.TechProfiles.org database now has approx. 1000 different technologies or products listed. All are available for licensing or for developing business applications with foreign or domestic partners. I worked with my staff to set up the www.TechProfiles.org website when I knew that I would be leaving STCU. I was afraid the information gathered over the 8-years would be lost. I believed in the scientists and their work and I wanted to help them as much as possible and that is why I set up the database for internet use. Thousands of people have viewed the information on the website since its inception more than 3 years ago. The information and technologies carried on the website are owned by the individual scientists that conceived, prepared and developed it. The technologies in general cannot be reproduced from the limited information on the website because there should not be enough technical information provided. If someone is interested in the technologies they can contact the scientists and start a dialog to collaborate with the scientist in order to license it and/or to develop it as a product--possibly to manufacture it as a joint venture. The engineers and scientists from each of the institutes and universities may be interested in providing consulting and licensing services for your company or working on specific R&D solutions for your company under a contractual arrangement. A Few Words About STCU: The Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU) is a non-profit inter-governmental organization that was created in Ukraine in 1993 by the U.S. Department of State to facilitate scientific and engineering cooperation between the United States, Canada and the EU States, and also to promote Western principles of non-proliferation in former Soviet Union countries after the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991. Similar Centers can be set up around the world as a means and a mechanism for scientific cooperation amongst countries that want their universities to work together with each other. In addition to scientific cooperation there could be other important, mutually agreed aims, such as non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction such as nuclear, chemical and biological. Other aims could be greater security in areas such as internet security, food safety, energy safety and security, biological, chemical and nuclear safety and security, IPR training, entrepreneurship training, business and start-up development, and others. Through such Centers new ideas, scientific results, and innovative products could be developed and promoted around the world for licensing and seeking investment funding. STCU provides R&D cooperation with top-level scientists and engineers at leading scientific institutes and universities around the world. The Science and Technology Center located in Ukraine is an intergovernmental organization whose goal is to assist scientists from Ukraine, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Moldova, and Uzbekistan, in their transition to self-supporting, peaceful activities in the international science and business communities. Since 1993, more than 200 private companies, universities and government agencies from the European Union, United States, and Canada have become STCU Partners and financed over 1560 R&D projects worth more than $250 million through STCU. There are many advantages for western companies, universities and investors of working through STCU. STCU reduces the business risk of working in Ukraine and other countries by offering: 1.Business security, reliability and confidentiality 2.Clear and transparent financial operations 3.Payments to scientists are tax-free 4.VAT-free purchases of equipment 5.Customs clearance assistance free of all duties and taxes 6.Project auditing and monitoring 7.Timely delivery of scientific reports and results 8.Host government project approval STCU is governed by a Board of Directors and Advisers from all the member countries. There are semi-annual Governing Board meetings where progress is reviewed, activities and projects are approved, and directions set for future operations. (Please note: STCU is not responsible for the contents of any of the technology profiles provided on this website. The material should be used as a guide only in order to interest others to collaborate and partner with the scientific organizations of these countries.) Over the last few years it has become apparent to us that such scientific organizations need to promote their scientific skills and opportunities in order to seek partnering opportunities with western investors and western organizations, both public and private. This website contains one-page capability descriptions of Azerbaijan, Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine, Uzbekistan universities and scientific institutes and one-page technology profile forms (TPFs). More information can be obtained directly from the scientific contacts provided at the universities and institutes. As these developing countries move toward a market-driven economic structure, their scientific institutes and universities will become increasingly important as technology drivers that promote the scientific research and technologies that are being developed and produced by their scientists. In order to establish business relations with western investors and business people, the various scientific communities will need new tools that will enable them to demonstrate their intellectual capital in the most productive manner. To meet the competitive challenges of integrating into the largely knowledge-based economies of the western world, the countries of the former Soviet Union needed and still need to continue to change and adapt to market directions. They will need to utilize the forms by which scientific communities get their products to the marketplace and through sales acquire wealth and promote healthy economies. Licensing, technology transfer and new high technology start-up companies will be some of the necessary steps leading to global economic integration. Since its completion in 2014 there the scientists have probably advanced their technologies significantly since the original TPF’s were created. As to successes, there are quite a few. Many of the technologies were developed as limited production products for use and sale in Ukraine. Some were developed and sold outside of Ukraine. Some were developed as improvements for production equipment in Ukrainian factories and were implemented in those factories associated with the institutes. Some of the scientists were able to find external partners to be interested in the technologies to continue the R&D and possibly form companies. Some of the technologies were licensed. Some startup companies were created, I could probably name about 2 dozen such companies. I do know that the scientists were very interested in promoting their technologies and products and getting them into some form of production and sales. Many of the Ukrainian startups continue today although understandably with limited funding, as with most startups even in the US. I believe the www.TechProfiles.org database is a good starting point for introducing someone to Ukrainian technologies and of course those of the other STCU countries. It is, however, only a starting point. People have moved on, technologies have become out of date and the world has moved on. Many younger scientists were not included in the TechProfiles database because they were not STCU’s focus. So, for example, IT technologies in general are not represented. This deficiency certainly needs to be addressed especially since IT activities are so important today. Much of the new R&D in Ukraine is being done at universities as well as scientific institutes of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. Today, with the introduction of Ideation by Douglas Graham, the TechProfiles database can lead to the identification of scientists and engineers, their qualifications and their expertise for use within the Ideation Platform. With Ideation we are seeking to enter a country with significant technical and scientific expertise to promote in the US and globally. Ideation will help Ukrainian scientists and engineers to protect and manage their innovations and, when they are ready, the Ideation Platform will help them to market their advanced technological inventions while still keeping them confidential. In addition, Ideation will enable them to find new opportunities to earn income through new contract R&D or patent reviews. (Please note: See UGTI’s earlier article about the Ideation Platform at the following web link: Ukraine – The ‘BrainBasket’ of the World(http://us13.campaign-archive1.com/?u=fc2ded176309d46ef7deb2bac&id=ad244c3484)). Technology Transfer Offices at universities and scientific institutes are an integral and valuable resource for scientists, researchers, and engineers in western countries for the development, licensing and commercialization of their innovations. The scientific communities in the countries of the former Soviet Union are now aware that the kind of services that these Technology Transfer Offices provide is very much needed by them also. Good luck with your scientific developments, and may this website, www.TechProfiles.org and Ideation help to promote the scientific opportunities that exist in Ukraine and other countries as they move toward a global, market-driven knowledge economy. Some Technological Examples from the www.TechProfiles.org Database: Here are several examples of technological advances made in Ukraine with the help of STCU that are not available in the US. They were made from earlier technological breakthroughs created by scientists and engineers developing highly secret Soviet military systems during the Cold War. 1)Treatment of the Eye for Age-Related Macular Degeneration There are millions of elderly people around the world who have Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). This disease can often leads to blindness. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the US and around the world. There is no known cure for AMD, although some medicines are being tried. In Odessa, Ukraine a medical research scientist developed an optical technique using low level laser light (monochromatic light) to control the disease. With the VisionAid system, an elderly patient is treated with safe LED light during 10-minute sessions for a period of 5 days. After the treatment the AMD disease is stopped from progressing any further, and the patient is able to see 2-lines better on the eye chart. The disease is controlled for a period of 3-6 months, and then the treatment is used again as needed throughout the patient’s life. The VisionAid optical treatment is being used in Ukraine and has prevented hundreds of patients from going blind and has promoted better vision. (See a more extensive description of the AMD system at: http://www.techprofiles.org/index.php/biotechnologies/681-unigue-visionaid-bio-photonic-treatment-for-age-related-macular-degeneration-amd ) 2)Non-invasive early heart diagnosis through Magneto-Cardiography (MCG). This is a heart diagnostic system for measuring the magnetic field of the human heart, and from that tiny magnetic signal which is measured by a SQUID detector at 4.2 degrees Kelvin, the magnetic field is determined across the heart, during the heartbeat. From this magnetic 2D picture the electricity flow is calculated. The electric flow density is shown in a 2D picture on the computer screen. From this picture the cardiologist is able to make a diagnosis of the heart ailment, all in a few minutes. Electric flow pictures have been correlated to detect and identify the patterns of electrical current for different types of heart disease. In order to use the MCG diagnostic system a person does not have to have a heart-attack or even feel any pain in the heart. The greatest benefit of the MCG system is that it can be used for early diagnosis of heart disease, allowing for early treatment so that people can live longer and healthier lives. Two such MCG systems are in use today in clinics in Kyiv, Ukraine. They have been used to save hundreds of lives. (See a more extensive description of the MCG system at : http://www.techprofiles.org/index.php/biotechnologies/249-supersensitive-magnetocardiographic-system-for-early-recognition-precise-diagnostics-and-monitoring-of-heart-diseases ) 3)Piezo-Electric Motor for the Micromanipulator That Takes Nano-Steps. This motor is unique in that it does not rotate like standard electric motors we commonly use. The piezo-electric motor is controlled by a computer and it moves in tiny steps. The piezo-electric motor has been incorporated into a micromanipulator which moves in X-Y-Z directions. This micromanipulator can take the smallest steps in the world, half a nano-meter. It can take such tiny steps and it can also be controlled to move greater distances such as millimeters or even centimeters. Such a nano-manipulator is very useful in cell biology. It is currently used for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) in order to help many women to conceive children. (See a more extensive description of the piezo-electric micromanipulator system at : http://www.techprofiles.org/index.php/biotechnologies/18-programmable-3-axis-piezoelectric-nanomanipulator ) There are many more such technological breakthroughs which do not exist in the United Stated but which could become innovative new products in the U.S. and throughout the world, helping to save lives, and also helping to create new high-tech jobs in the United States and around the world.

"Anticorruption in Ukraine: Unbiased Overview"

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"'U.S. supports Ukraine' against Russia, Trump tells foreign minister"

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"IFIs retain high level of confidence in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine offers EU new association format"

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10 May, 2017

"S&P affirms ratings on Ukraine at 'B-/B' with stable outlook"

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9 May, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Letter from UGTI founder Strong cybersecurity in Ukraine is critical to attracting western partners in industries oriented toward research and development / high-tech / intellectual property. Ukraine must attract foreign direct investment and strategic partners for the industries that will lay the foundation of its future knowledge economy. While UGTI wholeheartedly accepts that western companies could realize significant value by partnering with Ukrainian companies, research institutes and researchers across a variety of industries, the Ukrainian side too often fails to appreciate that because Ukraine is an inherently risky environment in which to do business, offering value without risk mitigation is not enough. Ukrainian companies are more likely to secure partnerships with third parties that are sensitive to theft of their intellectual property and sensitive information if they demonstrate a commitment to creating a secure environment in Ukraine within which the partnership can thrive. Because Ukraine is correctly perceived as a high-risk environment that presents country-risk, the Government of Ukraine should also engage and do everything possible to minimize investment risks, including the risk of cyber-attack and corporate or nation state espionage. The relative lack of investment in technology and cybersecurity over the past decade in Ukraine--means Ukrainian business and government largely skipped a generation of cybersecurity solutions, most of which have proven ineffective against emerging state-sponsored attacks. When Ukraine is ready to modernize, Vidder can both quickly and efficiently work with the government of Ukraine to create a digital environment wherein communications are secure, critical infrastructure is protected and businesses can thrive. Vidder and Ukraine Cybersecurity are prepared to prove that PrecisionAccess is an ideal solution for Ukraine by organizing a public and transparent hackathon in cooperation with the Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute. UGTI, Vidder and their partners including the Kyiv Polytechnic Institute will provide information regarding the hackathon will be provided over the coming weeks. If you or someone you know is interested in working with UGTI to plan, promote the hackathon, please write me at aleks.m@ukrainegti.com .

"Help Ukraine to help itself"

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8 May, 2017

"Ukraine seeking Canada's help to set up high-level corruption court"

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"Foreign and domestic business united to improve Ukraine’s investment climate"

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6 May, 2017

"Car market in Ukraine 29.6% up in Jan-April"

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"Ukroboronprom will present advanced armored vehicles, precision weapons at IDEF 2017 in Turkey"

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5 May, 2017

"Odesa container terminal will start servicing three world shipping companies in May"

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"USA becomes major importer of Ukrainian honey"

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4 May, 2017

"On Ukraine’s trade prospects with the EU"

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"U.S. leaves Ukraine in Priority Watch List of intellectual property rights protection"

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3 May, 2017

"Tillerson names condition for U.S. to engage with Russia on Ukraine issue"

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"U.S. Congress to allot at least $560 mln for Ukraine in 2017"

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2 May, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine is ready to earn your trust and business On my recent trip to Kiev I was invited to be part of a round table with discussion focused on how to attract foreign investment in areas of innovation, science and technology to Ukraine. My answer to that question, posed to me by top government official, was only one word – TRUST. Warren Buffet famously said “it takes 60 years to build trust and it takes 60 seconds to ruin it.” Unfortunately, since its independence trust in Ukraine been systematically eroding. Today, leaders of countries, management of corporations, private and institutional investors DO NOT trust government in Ukraine, DO NOT trust judicial system and have very LOW level of trust in private sector. The majority of Ukraine’s companies and governmental agencies need monies to be invested into infrastructure and/or operations of the business. In my experience the biggest shock comes when I suggest that Ukraine is not ready to receive funds. In the meeting I referenced above, I went on to suggest that building trust not only takes time but also requires a history demonstrating that Ukrainian counter parts can be trusted. Further, TRUST is a prerequisite to do any type of business. In addition to trust, Ukraine must build foundation that allows for a transparent, efficient and profitable way to do business. Big and small money always seeking opportunities around the world. So, first we need to reposition the question from “how to attract investment …?” to “what do we need to do for capital sources of all types to get excited about opportunities we present to make money?” Most talk about fighting corruption, lack of political leadership and similar issues Ukraine is dealing with. Of course all of them are critical but all of them require breaking current system. From my point of you it is an impossible task. Even if somehow we are successful, then the question is “what is an alternative?”. Without alternative there is NO motivation to change. There are NO future system to replace the old one. There is NO visibility for citizen or government official of how the future system will be better than the old one. Therefore, following this thought pattern, we must develop an alternative economic model that will use market forces to change individual behavior (of a citizen or a corporation) that will by its pure existence become a “disruptive technology” to the old way of doing business. We at UGTI developed a detailed plan for the ALTERNATIVE. 1. It is must start with the vision to unite the country. Ukraine has no VISION today that anyone can identify. Creating a vision based on combined intellect of the country’s people will be a powerful psychological boost to its population but it will also send a very strong signal around the world that Ukraine know what it wants. 2. Must create a fully functioning ecosystems for Innovation & Start Ups, Small and Medium size business and for the Big business. The integration of Start Up, SME & Big business ecosystem is essential for the success of Ukraine’s economy and growth of wealth amongst Ukrainian people. In the future, we want to see innovation that was born by academic institution, start up or an individual is immediately protected based on international IP laws. Next it is introduced to 3-5 existing companies in SME sector to assess viability of new invention in a marketplace and for further development into a market ready product or service. Immediately, as minimally viable product (MVP) is developed, it must be introduced to potential customer base for further refinement based on potential customer feedback. And lastly final product should be manufactured in Ukraine by factories within Big business ecosystem. 3. Create strong and fluid public/private partnerships with a key governmental agencies and companies. Working together consortium demonstrates to ALL stakeholders, domestic and foreign, its commitment to deliver long-term prosperity to all people of Ukraine. Each organization has its own focus and role but each is just one part of overall economic ecosystem that must work together. 4. Ukraine must actively SELL its opportunities across all sectors. China is extremely proactive in investing into a promotion of the opportunities in China and they are very actively investing abroad for a long-term. To do that Ukraine must know what it STANDS FOR; it must select BEST OF THE BEST companies and/or opportunities to represent it; those companies or opportunities must be ready to ACT and it must have people who can SELL. 5. Last but not least education at all levels. Country must develop curriculum for primary, secondary and higher education in collaboration with leading universities from around the world based on 20 scientific fields covering programs from early childhood to high school and university levels based 3 CORE areas: Science and Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, and Montessori Principals. Getting these 5 critical areas on to “execution train” will deliver a biggest message to all –Ukraine is ready to earn your trust and business. Please note - Ukraine is ready to earn your trust. It will take years before, as a country, Ukraine can say we EARNED THE TRUST of the world community. But we all know that a thousand-mile journey starts with the first step. Let’s make this FIRST step together.

"World Bank Boosts Support for Ukraine Export Development"

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"Alitalia returns to Ukrainian market after two-year absence"

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1 May, 2017

"Antonov continues upgrade of six An-158 aircraft for Cubana de Aviacion"

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"Ukraine shows economic upturn, moving investment increase – PM at meeting with American Chamber of Commerce leaders"

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29 April, 2017

"New Arrest Exposes Ukrainian Money Laundering in Western Europe"

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"Confiscated $1.5 bln of Yanukovych team's funds transferred to Ukraine's budget"

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28 April, 2017

"European Parliament confirms that Ukraine to get visa-free regime on June 11"

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"Devaluation of hryvnia could help expanding logistics market - expert"

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27 April, 2017
GEORGIY KRIVOV Director of the Ukrainian Research Institute of Aviation Technology (URIAT) UGTI on Facebook AVIATION INDUSTRY OF UKRAINE: REALITY AND ACTION DIRECTIONS FOR ITS DEVELOPMENT Currently, the global economy is in a state of a protracted crisis, and knowledge-intensive industries are most painfully aware of it. Investments in fundamental and applied research are being reduced, the volume of new developments is decreasing, and investments in the modernization of production are being reduced. In the second decade of the 21st century as one of the most high-tech industries aviation industry of Ukraine collided with all such negative phenomena. The aviation industry of Ukraine today has a few more than 30 enterprises, the vast majority of which are managed by the State Concern "Ukroboronprom." The number of employees in 2016 amounted to slightly more than 61 thousand people, and the volume of commodity output - about $530 million. To date, the state of the aviation industry of the country can still serve as a sufficiently good basis for its development, provided that state bodies participate actively in this process; but 3-4 years delay within radical measures can turn the stagnation of the industry into irreversible. The history has enough examples of state involvement in the support of the aviation industry, which accumulates the highest achievements of fundamental and applied science, the highest concentration of intelligence, scientific, engineering, industrial, competence, able to create and produce high-tech products. In all States within the full cycle of development and production of aviation technology, the state assumes responsibility for funding aviation projects in the amount of 15% - 30% of the costs for their creation. Guidance for the development of the aviation industry could be the State Development Program. An example of such a program is the State Integrated Aviation Industry Development Program of Ukraine for the period 2001-2010, which was completed in 2010. Not everything was resolved, but this program was a coordinator and a guide to the directions of joint efforts of state and private enterprises, state bodies and financial institutions. Prepared in 2009-2010 the State Targeted Scientific and Technical Program for the Development of the Aviation Industry of Ukraine for the period of 2011-2020 had a long-term discussion but was never adopted. And the aviation industry was out of state interests, due to which the airlines of Ukraine is not used, no aircraft built in the last decade. Today, the draft of the State target scientific and technical program for the development of the aviation industry for the period until 2027 is considered, which could become such a guide. The analysis of the basic indicators of the aviation industry of Ukraine shows her difficult condition. After a certain growth of commercial output in 2011 – 2015 is largely due to the change of the national currency, followed by a significant drop in these volumes in 2016. Despite the progressive growth of the average wage, the number of employees in the industry has been steadily falling. This means a lack of interest and motivation, especially among young people, to contribute their efforts in the high technology industry, which is aircraft engineering. The main problems of the industry are physical and moral deterioration of production capacity, venerable age of the basic specialists who keep all the knowledge and experience in the aircraft industry, the absence of certification centers for the evaluation and validation of subjects and objects of aviation activities in Ukraine, and the absence of international recognition of certificate for aeronautical engineering, founded in Ukraine. Today, some foreign companies have displayed their interest in the results of scientific and technical activities in the field of aircraft construction. With the support of government agencies these companies are ready to invest in aviation projects, prepared and started in Ukraine. To date, the international aviation business considers investment in the production capacities formation on the territories of states with no full cycle of aviation project creation. Such projects include plane AN-132 manufacturing compaign in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia or the establishment of aircraft AN-178 production in the Republic of Azerbaijan. Other aircraft manufacturers choose to shorten the cycle of aviation project creation, while taking an intellectual package of Ukrainian authorship as a basis and constructing production and service capacities. Chinese aircraft manufacturers should be mentioned, as soon as they intend to set up a production of an aircraft AN-178 and its engine in China. It shows a considerable authority of applied science and a high level of aviation projects created in Ukraine. Using the experience of developed countries a greater attention to the aviation industry would rise youth employment in the knowledge-intensive industry, would ensure the profitability of the industry. One of the main steps towards it could be a state defense order for aviation products, a portfolio of system orders for civil aircraft, cheap loans and state guarantees for their return, special tax solutions at the state level, partnership and cooperative programs with partners of developed countries, protecting policies towards national aircraft builders. The mentioned steps could be applied to make the regulatory framework of the state more loyal to the knowledge-intensive industry, as well as to encourage the Development Program of this branch. On the other hand private airlines are also in need of state preferences. The analysis of tendencies in passenger and cargo transportation in Ukraine, analysis of aircraft fleet development of the key airlines shows how aviation products can be implemented in the domestic market. To create attractive domestic aviation product, airlines may be granted with preferences in acquiring and owning domestic aircraft, protection against import can be strengthened, thereby creating prerequisites for an effective formation of domestic market of own aviation products. Within dynamic filling of domestic market with own aviation products, the rating of these aviation products in foreign markets will sharply rise. This will ensure an increase in orders for these aviation products, making it systematic without the participation of the state. Following the example of the world's leading centers of aviation production the support of high-tech production including aviation technology should continue throughout the process of aviation products creating and manufacturing. High-tech engineering provides several key directions for the development of the state and society: first of all, the development of science-intensive production raises the intellectual and cultural level of society involved in the production; secondly, it provides employment of the population 4 times the size of those directly working in aviation production; thirdly, it raises the image of a country that has a full package of aviation technologies and implements them, which provides high international ratings not only for aircraft but also for other products, the promotion of these products to foreign markets will significantly improve; fourth, high-tech engineering provides a tangible contribution to the country's budget and other state funds.

"IFC invested $900 million in Ukrainian agrarian sector for six years"

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"Motor Sich sees net profit rise by 4.8 times in Q1, 2017 - IFRS report"

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26 April, 2017

"Belarus, Ukraine to set up new joint ventures in various sectors"

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"USAID to support 25 territorial communities in decentralization project"

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"Ukraine boosts grain exports by 52 pct in March – Reuters"

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25 April, 2017

"Turkey resumes imports of Ukrainian wheat – media"

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"Ukraine to present its achievements at Expo 2017 in Astana"

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24 April, 2017

"National Bank: Ukraine’s economic growth to speed up in next two years"

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"Ukraine offers metro, bridge and high-speed rail link to China Railways"

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22 April, 2017

"Chinese Ambassador in Kyiv named sectors of the Ukrainian economy in which Chinese investors are interested"

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"Week’s balance: growth against all odds, pension-related "unprofessionalism" and snow-covered harvest"

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21 April, 2017

"Atlantic Council blog: The right land reform could transform Ukraine now "

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20 April, 2017

"Chinese investors breathe new life to Ukraine's rural"

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19 April, 2017

"Poroshenko urges British business to invest in Ukraine"

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"Business waiting for transparent infrastructure access mechanism - EBA"

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18 April, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine – it is time to ACT In life and in business timing is the key to success. If one asks a girl to go out at the funeral or go to market too early, one will most likely fail in both situations. One of the principles of Oriental martial arts: " You do not try to stop your opponent, you let him come at you - and then give him a tap in just the right direction as he rushes by. The idea is to observe, to act courageously and to pick you timing extremely well". So, after 3 years of R&D we at UGTI believe it is a perfect time to start our operations. Our focus “You can lose ability to execute original plan but you never lose responsibility of executing the intent.” Author Unknown • Ukraine Cybersecurity LLC (“UCS”) – is United States based organization. UCS had secured the right to resell products and services from leading US cybersecurity companies and will be responsible for integration of above mentioned products and services to universities, government agencies and companies in Ukraine. We start operations June 1st, 2017 • Ukraine Intellectual Lab LLC (“UIL”) - is United States based organization. UIL carries responsibility to generate outsourcing, R&D, design and joint venture opportunities for Ukrainian companies, universities, scientists and engineers. Effectively, UIL is a salesforce for the intellectual, scientific and engineering community of Ukraine. We start operations June 1st, 2017 • The Ideation Platform Inc. - is United States based organization will provide an infrastructure to enable the Ukrainian innovation ecosystem under the auspices of the Ukrainian Intellectual Labs. This will both provide a broad set of tools for managing innovation from electronic lab notebooks to the automatic generation of licenses as well as a trusted community in which scientists and engineers can collaborate and joint venture secure in the knowledge that their IP will be respected and protected. • Briggs Capital, LLC. – International Merger & Acquisition advisory firm providing value creation and specializing in low- to mid-market size companies in manufacturing, technology and business services sectors. Will open its office in Kiev on June 1st, 2017 • Sikorsky Challenge Entrepreneurship School - today and tomorrow Entrepreneurs and Leaders of the companies must bring ideas to reality with a clear understanding that “change” will be present every step of the way. It is always better to initiate the change then to be forced to change. If one is forced to change it might be too late. What is hot today, tomorrow no one will take it off your hands for free. In September of 2017, UGTI in partnership with KPI will launch 4 courses that will be taught by CEO’s of and professors from leading Universities from United States : 1) Idea to Reality - The course is designed for individuals who are contemplating becoming entrepreneur and the ones who already made a GIAGANTIC step to transform their Idea to Reality 2) Taking Business to the Next Level - The course is designed for top managers and owners/founders of small and medium size businesses. The course is strictly focused on getting business to NEXT LEVEL of growth, profitability and scalability. 3) Executive Leadership for 21st Century - The course is designed for founders, c-level executives and government leaders of small, medium and large size business. The course is strictly focused on development of long-term strategy, personal development of leaders and building ecosystems surrounding core business. 4) Sales Culture to Drive Growth & Profitability - this course is designed for ALL. If you are a sales person, a business development manager, an entrepreneur, Chief Executive Officer of small or big business, this is a course for you. Here is what we had accomplishments to date: • Organized global network of 100 professionals who are leaders and experts in their respective fields and over the last 3 years, built organizational infrastructure in Ukraine. • Secured exclusive agreements with leading US providers of cybersecurity solutions. • Designed 4 Entrepreneurial 10 month courses – A. Idea to Reality; B. Taking Business to the Next Level; C. Leadership for the 21st Century; and Sales Culture to Drive Growth and Profitability. • Access to more than 10,000 Ukrainian scientists and engineers covering a wide range of specialties and across levels of expertise. Such a highly skilled manpower resource allows UGTI to manage projects of high complexity and those that require teams of professionals from different disciplines. • Developed relationships with government and business leaders in Ukraine, as well as with representatives of many US federal government and key state agencies. • Secured services of outside counsel Dentons LLP. Dentons is the largest law firm in the world with offices in nearly 70 countries. With such legal expertise and global footprint Dentons can operate and work with companies from around the world. • Registered UGTI, Ukraine Cybersecurity & Ukraine Intellectual Lab as legal entities in United States World renown economist Schumpeter viewed failure as: “a phase through which nearly all people must pass on the way to success. The ability to take a punch, and then get up off the canvas to win the fight was, he thought, one of the defining characteristics of entrepreneurs. UGTI team is ready to go! Let’s do this together. Get involved!

"South Korea intends to invest in Ukrainian agribusiness"

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"Poroshenko visits UK for talks on cooperation in defense area, - MP"

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17 April, 2017

"Ukrgasbank starts to issue interest-free loans for electric car purchase"

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"Ukraine's central bank to transfer nearly US$1.66 bln to budget in 2017"

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15 April, 2017

"India interested in investments in alternative energy of Ukraine – Energy and Coal Industry Ministry"

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"Poroshenko signs decree changing NSDC staff structure"

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14 April, 2017

"Nestle invests UAH 400 mln in production in Ukraine in 2016"

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"Ukraine to join development of Trans-Caspian international transport corridor"

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13 April, 2017
MAN HOANG CEO of Rival Group UGTI on Facebook RIVAL FOR UKRAINE My name is Man Hoang and I founded Rival Group in 2017 to provide a holistic approach to client engagement, eliminating points of friction in both products and businesses processes, through strategy, product design, engineering and growth for a full-cycle, quality assured experience. As noted by my friend Aleks Mehrle, President of UGTI, in his UGTI email release on Tuesday, April 11, Rival Group is a New York City tech consultancy, providing a full life cycle of services that help entrepreneurs and enterprises grow their products, surpass competitors and increase revenue. Through the process described below, Rival Group with support from UGTI will help Ukrainian businesses convert, invert and subvert in their industries, creating infinitely scalable products with actionable strategy to compete in the tech era and become the leading rival in their industry. Through the process described below, Rival Group with support from UGTI will help Ukrainian businesses convert, invert and subvert in their industries, creating infinitely scalable products with actionable strategy to compete in the tech era and become the leading rival in their industry. Rival Background Startup Partner -- Business Inception to Acquisition 1)Rival provides tech industry grade strategy, design, engineering, and growth tactics to advise and help clients through the entire lifespan of their business. 2)Historic success includes helping 5 startups grow and profitably exit via acquisition. 3)ComputerLove.net by Publicis France, KiteSender.com by JPay Inc., AllPaws.com by PetSmart. SME Partner -- Uniquely Tailored Disruptive Strategy and Engineering 1) Strategic consultation to growing and mature brands, advising them on how to deploy cloud architectures, coordinate with stakeholders on global IT initiatives, rebuild existing technologies, create new technologies, and iterate on a product’s growth. 2) Clients include HP, Movado, CONTEND, NBC, Toyota, PetSmart, Chronicle, amongst others in a variety of industries Experienced Business Owner -- Entrepreneurial DNA 1) Rival builds and manages proprietary products with in-house technology, thus fully understanding all operational aspects, financial limitations, and growth problems small businesses encounter. 2) Covetier - Rival’s real-time search engine and purchasing tool for high-end collectors. 3) FacesOfFuture.com - Rival’s women empowerment social platform. Rival’s Partnership Development, Fundraising and Business Development Program Rival will help UA ICT companies by connecting them with trusted American service providers, strategic partners, venture / angel investors, and potential client prospects. Rival’s historical collaboration with a host of top American service providers will align UA companies with the appropriate partner to assist with business needs. This program will also help UA ICT companies secure seed capital, additional rounds of funding, and/or lead to an IPO by tapping into Rival’s wealthy investor network. Rival will also help with business development initiatives of UA ICT companies by promoting marketing collateral, passing along business decks, and pitching the products and value propositions of UA ICT companies in the U.S. Rival Group Conclusion Rival Group looks forward to providing its unique skillset, learnings, and purview with entrepreneurial Ukrainians who want to achieve the “American Dream” of business success. Rival Group and UGTI Contact For more information about Rival and/or Rival’s plans for Ukraine together with UGTI, please write an email to Man Hoang (man@rivalgroup.io) and Aleks Mehrle (aleks.m@ukrainegti.com). *Disclaimer: Rival Group advances and pursues gender equality & continuation of anti-discriminatory business ethics to be inclusive of all peoples regardless of age, gender, race, sexual orientation, disabilities, income, or any other potentially marginalizing factors.

"Ukraine`s Verkhovna Rada votes to introduce competitive electricity market"

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"Kyivmetrobud signs UAH 4 bln contract with Turkey's Limak to complete metro in Dnipro"

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12 April, 2017

"Ukraine exports 35 mln tonnes of grain since start of 2016/2017 MY"

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"Naftogaz's charter capital grows by almost US$1.1 bln"

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11 April, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook RIVAL FOR UKRAINE UGTI recently started coordinating its efforts in Ukraine with Rival Group and that is great news for Ukrainian SMEs across all industries active in Ukraine. Like me, Rival’s founder Man Hoang is a first-generation American entrepreneur living and working in New York City. Different paths lead our families to this great city, a city that I believe best embodies the vision of a City Upon a Hill whose bright can not only be seen from anywhere in the world but which also beckons and welcomes those who follow it to the mouth of the Hudson River. Man sees the great potential in Ukraine clearly and I am grateful to him and his colleagues at Rival for their willingness to work with UGTI to help Ukrainian businesses grow into themselves and make a positive impact on the world. Rival Group UGTI recently started coordinating its efforts in Ukraine with Rival Group and that is great news for Ukrainian SMEs across all industries active in Ukraine. Rival Group is a New York City tech consultancy, providing a full life cycle of services that help entrepreneurs and enterprises grow their products, surpass competitors and increase revenue. Through the holistic offering of strategy, product, engineering and product growth, Rival gives its clients a resilient foundation for a truly competitive, solvent, and scalable business. Tapping into its 11 plus years of creating and growing 5 startups to acquisition, Rival Group has developed a remarkable purview into what fortifies a business’ value proposition, viability and competitive edge, and what constitutes world-class technology. Rival Group is trusted by a host of large enterprises and pioneering entrepreneurs to provide a path to becoming the canonical market leader in their respective industries. Ukrainian Connection Rival’s founder is an active donor and supporter of Razom, a non-profit focused on building “a prosperous Ukraine by increasing civic engagement in Ukraine.” Source: razomforukraine.org. Through his work with Razom he met Aleks Mehrle, co-founder of Ukraine Global Trade & Investor, Inc. (“UGTI”). UGTI was founded to become a transparent, efficient and powerful driver of sustainable economic growth and development in Ukraine by aligning the economic interests of Ukrainian businesses with those of Western counterparts through trade and investment. Ukraine’s Economic Problem Ukraine’s greatest potential asset is its large Information and Communications Technology (ICT) graduate and professional base, yet that asset has stagnated and has not been fully realized. Over the years the UA has developed a reputation abroad, specifically in the U.S., as a country specialized in providing low cost engineering and IT services as an offshored agency partner. Consequently, there is a growing stigma in the American business community that offshoring leads to miscommunication and mismanagement of projects. Clients receiving offshored software engineering typically experience critical business-breaking bugs, absence of feature requirements, and poor application performance. Due to the global stigma surrounding Ukraine’s ICT companies, Rival recommends that the UA ICT companies break from current market stagnation by transitioning from offshored agency ICT companies to web/mobile product based companies that use the learnings, strategies, business practices, and technologies that power the multi billion dollar American startup sector. Rival’s and UGTI’s Mission Working with UGTI, Rival aims to help refactor Ukraine’s IT sector into a thriving startup economy with the vision to make Ukraine’s IT hub on par with Silicon Valley. Rival will tap into its startup knowledge and track record of growing 5 startups to liquidity events. Through its involvement, Rival will illuminate and educate the ways and means that American startups and SMEs have employed to achieve high growth and multi-billion dollar evaluations. Rival will create a series of programs that will transfer and import America’s cutting edge business and technology purview to Ukraine. Rival will mentor and advise UA startups and SMEs on how to combine strategic planning, technological competitive advantage and bright-minded human capital to create world class invention and innovations companies within the UA economy. Rival’s and UGTI’s Plan Transition Ukrainian service based startups and SMEs in ICT into product based companies and teach UA startups and SMEs the learned approaches of how Rival has helped U.S. based startups achieve success through four phases: strategy, design, engineering, and growth. The strategy phase entails Rival offering financial modeling, business model development, product strategy, marketing and communication tactics, sales training, and all encompassing strategies that comprise a startup’s reason to exist and resiliency against competitors. The design phase will help UA startups design web & mobile products to the standards and expectations of the global customer. This phase includes development of an educational curriculum that trains designers in UA companies to render UI/UX, wireframes, funnel designs, etc. to best practices and competitive standards. The engineering phase includes partnering with America’s best coding bootcamp and launching a franchise location in Ukraine. This enables Ukrainian IT students to be trained, educated, and mentored by the same standards that American startups expect domestic engineering prospects to have. The growth phase allows UA startups and SMEs to attend virtual office hours with core Rival disciplinarians. Office hours are critical for success as advice and mentorship may be more easily communicated via a live dialogue. The growth phase also includes product management services such as analytics insights, product roadmap and iterations, working with business owners on converting KPI goals into actionable user stories for referrals and business growth. Rival will vet a sophisticated engineering boot camp and implement an online design course to teach UA startups and SMEs best practices. Through the virtual office hours, Rival will advise the companies on how to overcome business challenges, engineering hurdles and growth stagnation. Rival’s four-tiered strategy is designed to help existing web/mobile product UA companies to elevate themselves onto the global stage. In addition, this four-phase approach will be used to help service based UA ICT companies refactor themselves as product based companies. By inciting an economy of web/mobile product companies, Ukraine surpasses its current reputation as an outsourcing nation and becomes a global nexus of innovation. Later this week (Thursday, April 13), Rival will provide more information through UGTI’s network regarding details of its plan for Ukraine. For more information about Rival and/or Rival’s plans for Ukraine together with UGTI, please write an email to Aleks Mehrle (aleks.m@ukrainegti.com) and Man Hoang (man@rivalgroup.io).

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8 April, 2017

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6 April, 2017
EDUARD KUZNETSOV ADVISER TO THE HEAD OF THE STATE SPACE AGENCY OF UKRAINE UGTI on Facebook AN UNKNOWN UKRAINE The third millennium is characterized as the beginning of global transformation of international relations, economy and politics in many countries. Mankind has entered the era of a global information society formation. Even wars in this society are special and they are conducted within the help of mass media. Television, newspapers, Internet are weapons, journalists are soldiers, bloggers are partisans, and their purpose and victims - townsfolk, population of different countries. The most vulnerable among them are young people who have insufficient immunity to information attacks and do not have sufficient education and life experience in order to resist sophisticated ideological operations. What are the consequences of such a war? This is a decrease of interest in active public life, prestigious professions investigation, career growth, isolation in the Internet space, passion for alcohol, drugs, moral decay and more. All of it arises a big problem in modern society. The effectiveness of protection against information warfare factors depends on population education and awareness which comes from family, social institutions that form a healthy, educated, morally stable generation. Thus comes the result of long-term work in the education system and upbringing that has been developed in a country. During many years, a stable system of youth education and upbringing has been formed in Ukraine. It comprised efforts of family, pre-school work and non-school institutions, comprehensive schools and institutions of higher education. As a result, on January 1st, 2015, the overall literacy rate of the country's population reached 99.7%, which is considered as the 4th most educated nation in the world (from 150 countries). According to the analysis, a significant part of young people in the 60-70s of the last century used to prefer exact sciences and engineering professions. This ensured the rapid development of the country at that time. At industrial enterprises, which were built and opened throughout the country, the average age of the staff was 27-28 years. And among the workers of rocket, space and electronics industries, the half had higher education, and 80% of the workers graduated from special vocational schools. The "golden cohort" of Ukrainian engineers and designers was formed on the basis of powerful industrial centers (Kyiv, Zaporizhya, Dnipro, Donetsk, Lugansk, Mykolayiv, Kharkiv) and had hundreds of young people, graduates of higher educational institutions, who eventually became known all over the world. The foundation of knowledge and the desire for engineering professions was laid by them in comprehensive schools, technical circles, young technicians stations and in other extracurricular institutions. Due to this system of education, multiplied by the enthusiasm of young people, in the second part of the last century Ukraine became a powerful space country. And this gave impetus to the development of many other industries. In the late 1980s, Ukraine was one of the most powerful countries in Europe and accounted for 5% of the world's GDP. Traditions developed in the past decades are still preserved. The boom in the profession of economists, lawyers and journalists, which arose in the 2000s, is slowly declining. In recent years, the universities of the country graduate more and more specialists of engineering professions. Every year, up to 16,000 specialists in the field of information technology, and about 130,000 engineers in various fields, are trained. This is every 5th graduate of higher education. Unfortunately, not all of them can realize their opportunities in practice because of the economic crisis in the country. Challenges of the 21st century demand young people to form a new worldview. And these are completely new approaches in the study of exact, natural sciences, gaining knowledge about universe and the prospects for human civilization development. In Ukraine, with a rich history of space science, rocket and space technology development, in the country that is home to outstanding scientists, designers and engineers in the field of aviation and cosmonautics, such as I.Sikorsky, Y. Kondratyuk, S.Korolev, M.Yangel, V.Glushko, V.Chelomei, Lozino-Lozinsky, we can not help thinking about the future, about new horizons for the knowledge of the Great Cosmos and the formation of a system for training young people to implement these plans. Despite the existing institutions of higher education for training specialists in the space industry in the country (Kyiv National Aviation University, Dneprovsky State University, Kharkiv Aerospace University and others), after gaining its independence of Kyiv Polytechnic Institute the Faculty of Aerospace Systems (FAX) was opened, it immediately became popular among young people. Several years passed and in 2014 the first student satellite made at this institute, "Politan-1", was launched into orbit around the Earth, and in 2017 - "Politan -2". One of the main trends in contemporary educational policy of the state should be the formation of cosmic outlook of younger generation. In Ukraine, there is a certain system of Aerospace Education of Youth. At the same time, the State Space Agency of Ukraine, the Aerospace Association, the Youth Association "Suzirie", the Small Academy of Sciences, the Planetariums, the Cosmonautics Museum, the National Center for Aerospace Education of Youth and the branches of these organizations in many cities of Ukraine also systematically manage this work. The experience of these organizations proves a great will of young people for space knowledge, creation of rocket and space technology. Pupils of secondary schools who participate in these organizations take part in competitions, exhibitions, contests on space themes and have significant achievements in missile modeling competitions. They often prepare reports for thematic conferences "Man and Space," "Dniepero Orbit", which are held in the Dnipro on the basis of the National Center for Aerospace Education of Youth, in S.P.Korolev hometown Zhytomir "Royal Readings" are organized on the basis of the Cosmonautics Museum, in Chernivtsi on the basis of the Space museum "Space Exploration: Past, Present and Future", etc. Recently Ukrainian teams regularly occupy top places and take prizes at European and world championships in rocket modeling. It evidences the systematic work with young people at all levels. In 2016, during a hackathon announced by NASA the national youth team of our country won by offering a unique method of moving the spacecraft on Mars (Mars Hopper). A special increase of space subjects related interest among young people was noted during the preparation of Ukrainian cosmonaut Leonid Kadenyuk’s flight on the shuttle Columbia (mission STS-87) as part of an international crew in 1997, and this interest persists for a long time. More than 20 thousand Ukrainian pupils and as many from the USA participated in the so-called "educational program" during this mission. Years passed and many of them remained loyal to space ideas, with which they were "infected" during our cosmonaut’s flight. After graduating from high schools, they came to work at the enterprises of the rocket and space industry of Ukraine. The percentage of young people among employees of leading enterprises is up to 30%. The examples of space exploration by leading space nations of the world and in particular Ukraine became a huge stimulating factor to attract young people to engineering professions, to study space science, rocket construction and space technology. Recently, the 25th anniversary of the State Space Agency of Ukraine was celebrated in our country. Since that time, 140 domestic carrier rockets were launched from six spaceports of the world and by request of 25 countries more than 370 space vehicles were put into orbit. Furthermore, in our country control systems for 263 Soyuz LV, 179 Proton LV, 46 Molniya LV, and 28 Rokot RN were manufactured. 138 sets of “Kurs” equipment manufactured at Kyiv enterprises ensured the convergence and docking of spacecraft with orbital stations. Participation of Ukraine in the creation of “Zenit” carrier rockets for international projects "Sea Launch", "Ground Launch" and in projects "Antares" (USA) and European rocket "Vega" certainly attract young people to the industry. Mankind enters a new stage of its development - building of a postindustrial society in which information and knowledge will be the main and most valuable productive resource. Scientific developments become the main driving force of the economy, and the main factor in the development of this society will be human capital - highly educated people, professionals, primarily scientists, engineers, IT specialists who will make up a new, elite class of society. They will quickly replace the current "pseudoelite", which consists of oligarchs and their offsprings, the so-called "golden youth", various kinds of showmen and "secular lionesses", boxers, dancers and TV-cooks. The famous American businessman Henry Ford once said that the most difficult thing in this world is to think with your own head. Our youth is not frightened with it but and gets attracted. Nowadays we are looking for, find and educate young representatives who should form the basis of a new intellectual class in our country. These people will have to bear a new way of thinking, form new relationships, build a future on new principles. In the past decade developed space states are accumulating scientific and technical potential for a powerful breakthrough in space technologies, the development of rocket and space technology, which should occur in the next 5-10 years. This breakthrough will be made by today's young people - pupils and students. I believe that the contribution of Ukrainian youth in it will be very significant and important.

"Ukraine offers cooperation in UAV creation, cyber security to Chile"

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5 April, 2017

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4 April, 2017
ROD ROBERTSON Chairman of UGTI Inc. Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook UKRAINE ENTREPRENEURS—REV UP YOUR ENGINES! I just returned with our delegation from a hectic week in Kiev. Dissipating are the last vestiges and stigmas for the omni-present Russian hangover. Mother Russia has moved on to other regional flash points and hot spots. The drive for a sustainable living and the need to prosper has pushed geo-political concerns into the back seat. Bread on the table, a car and fashionable attire are once again all consuming for this work-starved land with it’s well-educated populace. The Oligarchies and wealthy men who benefitted from Ukraine’s financial chaos are now poised to put their vast holding back to work in legitimate enterprises backing USA and Ukraine joint ventures. We all would like to believe that the greed and avarice that crippled the country is now receding as watchdog groups and new barriers against graft are taking root. The young have had a few years now (post conflict) to start a thousand firms and entrepreneurial businesses are flourishing everywhere. With cash restrictions, most new enterprises will founder but hundreds will prosper….How can a country with 100,000 computer programmers and legions of tech savvy people not” leap forward”? They do not need funding for inventory, land or finished goods-just funding for rapid growth tech startups. We are now working with ten strong entities in all sectors. These business leaders are peers of their western counterparts. They are motivated by obtaining a new status on the world stage and are driven in seeking a standard of living on par with the west. Long hours, mostly working no cash reserves have turned them into wily entrepreneurs as they cope with their harsh environment. This new generation of young entrepreneurs with their traditional oligarchies counterparts, will join commercial forces with the west. In five years time, these ambitious citizens will take their rightful place on the world stage in their chosen industries.

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3 April, 2017

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1 April, 2017

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1 April, 2017

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31 March, 2017

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30 March, 2017
ALEKSANDR DASHIVETS "General Aviation Design Bureau", General Director, Chief Designer UGTI on Facebook AVIATION INDUSTRY OF UKRAINE The aviation industry of Ukraine, which is known primarily due to the world famous aviation brand "Antonov" and its aircraft, from small An-2 to An‑225 super aircraft, unfortunately, has been experiencing a systemic crisis for the past twenty-five years. The victim of which were not less famous companies as "Tupolev", "Ilyushin" and many others. Despite the efforts to save Ukraine’s aircraft industry and declarations of those in power about the priority of it, the conflict of the past and present economic systems prevents the industry from efficient operating in the near future for several reasons. The main of them is its incapability of quick adaptation to the existence in the conditions of competition with western countries and even partnership with them. Decades were lost on the "eastern hopes". At the same time, highly qualified personnel capable of solving the most complex design problems are lost every day. There is no continuity of generations and no common idea uniting the team. Over the past thirty years, the conceptual and technological baseline of the aircraft projects rested on the prototypes designed in the 1980s, i.e. in the years when Oleg Antonov lived and worked. World-famous aircraft that survived their creator fly nowadays, thanks only to his foresight and creativity of his team. The scientific and technical base created by Antonov’s team is still capable to develop advanced aviation equipment. However, the most important thing is that there are aviation professionals, including specialists of Antonov’s school, which could invest their knowledge and skills into the rebirth of active aircraft design and manufacture in Ukraine. It is known that the activation of Ukraine's economic growth, including the aviation industry, is expected in case of targeted investment in specific programs, and it directly depends on the investment attractiveness of the investment subject and the environment/surroundings, i.е. risks. During the analysis of conditions necessary for the creation of such attractiveness the proposals and investment conditions declared by the US investment company UGTI Inc. have been studied. Hopefully, after the company’s programs of creation of Intellectual centers, Industrial parks and Working capital for agricultural holdings, which are currently being developed, are successfully implemented, the company will give the priority to the Aviation & Space program. In this case, the question can be different. In what kind of aviation the investing should start. Special attention should be payed to the focus of UGTI Inc. programs on the increase of the general educational level of youth. These programs ensure that young specialists are involved in the work of intellectual and specialized scientific and technical centers. That is the perfect way of training highly qualified and creative specialists. In my opinion, the Aviation & Space development program in combination with the rest of UGTI Inc. programs can help activate Ukrainian aviation industry. It is logical to start with the development of light aviation, which is attractive to young people. It is important to combine business and pleasure, such a strategy will surely help educate a new generation of specialists and be useful for business. That is why it is reasonable to begin with the modernization of aviation that provides services in agricultural and forest sector (these are priority areas for UGTI Inc. and Ukraine). Thanks to An-2 aircraft, Ukraine had been a leading country in the world according to statistics of the application of aviation in agricultural sector for a long time. Nowadays the picture has changed. Today, the absolute leader in the number of aircraft and helicopters (hereinafter referred to as aircraft) used in agricultural sector is the United States (about 3,000 units). Next is Brazil – about 2,000 units. Australia and New Zealand are the leaders according to the maximum area percentage of agricultural crops being farmed by aircraft. South Africa and Argentina have increasing tendency of application of aviation in agricultural sector. Agricultural aviation is used to feed plants, to protect plants from weeds, diseases and insects that destroy crops or reduce the yield, for plant desiccation which speeds up harvesting, especially high-growth crops such as sunflower, corn, rape, and even wheat in rainy summer. On average, crops protection, fertilizing and desiccation are carried out on about 20% of fields in the world and this percentage is increasing. In Ukraine, the farmed area for the agricultural crops was 15-16 million hectares in the 1980s, the required farmed area for agricultural aviation was 5-6 million hectares in 2012. But approximately 30% of these areas are farmed by aviation nowadays. Previously farming was performed with the help of outdated equipment such as An-2 aircraft, Mi-2 and Ka-26 helicopters. But meanwhile, a lot of related work was performed by newly created and certified ultralight aircraft, operating mainly to protect plants, equipped with modern ultra-small-volume spraying equipment with the rate of application 2.5-5 liters per hectare. New technologies for the pest management purposes (Trichogramma air-spraying, foliar side dressing, various desiccants, etc.) were implemented. And today the prospects for the growth of agricultural aviation services in Ukraine primarily depend on the availability of this aviation. Of course, the old equipment depletes its resource, and since the marketability of the old equipment is not very high, there is no sense in restoring its operability. There are requests for the performance of such tasks, but the relationship between the aircraft operator and landowners are not formalized. Issues regarding the checks of the flight legality, registration of aircraft and certification of pilots are usually solved not transparently. Only a few farmers agree to such conditions. Everybody understands the usefulness of agricultural aviation in the country with the deep traditions of creating the most massive agricultural aircraft of the last century. In the beginning of the 21st century ultra-light aircraft, helicopters and trikes were certified for agricultural purposes in Ukraine. This became possible thanks to highly qualified specialists who developed ultra-light aircraft for sport and for commercial purposes. The main idea is to create the conditions for marketability use of new generation aviation equipment for agricultural sector. At the same time, agrarians are well aware that promptly organized process of fertilizing, protecting, and desiccating crops yield can be raised from 15 to 50% for different crops. This experience is widely applied in the USA and Canada, in Brazil, and Argentina, i.e. in countries with developed agricultural production. Aviation equipment must meet the highest standards of performance, flight safety, and ecology. We have projects for development of such equipment. However, serial production is only possible in the conditions of normal credit system, with organized leasing sale process and maintenance. I hope these aims can be reached with the help of UGTI Inc. programs. As a result, the development of new generation aircraft for agricultural sector and new environment for the agricultural aviation business management will ensure the success of the program "Aviation agricultural yield support". The use of agricultural aviation in Ukraine and the following innovations developed in Ukraine contribute to the increase of the yield. The use of ultra-small-volume rotating air-sprayers developed by us with the rate of application 2.5-12 liters per hectare (the level of monodispersity (a drop of one size) to 85%). This is 1.5 times better than in many foreign analogues. It improves the ecology and provides savings during use of the active substance by several times compared with ground-based application. Biological means of plant protection, side dressing, including foliar, allow raising the yield of agricultural crops up to 2 times. Development and use of geoinformational technologies for maintaining the field cadaster allow protecting and improving the productivity of agricultural fields. For the organization of a transparent